Does Thunderwave normally deal falling damage? [duplicate]

Is normal that if a target is Thunderwave’d into a wall, then they take initial damage from the Spell, and then additional "falling damage" from being flung into the wall.

Similarly, if there’s an object (say, a cart) between the target at the caster, would it be normal for the target to get hit by the cart and be dealt additional damage as a result?

I can’t find anything in RAW that explicitly covers it either way, and obviously the DM can Rule Zero whatever they want. But would doing so be considered normal?

What is the falling damage of tiny creatures? [duplicate]

Depending on the height and weight of the falling creature, and its aerodynamical properties, there is no rule in game to define the damage for falling tiny creatures. By the given rules a humanoid falls 500 feet per round and takes 1d6 bludgeoning damage per fallen 10 feet up to 20d6 (Feather Fall 60 ft./rd.). By this article (https://perryponders.com/2015/07/16/ants-fall-from-any-height-without-dying/) the terminal velocity of a human is around 1,056 feet per round. A cat (528 ft./rd.), mice (147.48 ft./rd.), or an ant (34.32 ft./rd.) have even smaller terminal velocities, all surviving an almost unlimited falling height in air and by earth gravity. What will be the damage to tiny creatures, when they fall and hit the ground in Toril? Would a flying familiar like hawk, raven, bat, or owl wake up or die (return to its dimension) when it hits the ground, if it falls prone or were put asleep in flight? This seems also be relevant for the Polymorph spell and the Druid Wild Shape form, used to "parachute."

Sleet Storm: do crampons stop you from falling prone?

The 3rd level spell Sleet Storm has the following effect:

The ground in the area is covered with slick ice, making it difficult terrain. When a creature enters the spell’s area for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there, it must make a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, it falls prone.

Crampons (price: 2 gp) provide the following benefit:

A crampon is a metal plate with spikes that is strapped to the sole of a boot. A creature wearing crampons can’t fall prone while moving across slippery ice.

Does wearing crampons mean the Sleet Storm spell can’t knock you prone?

Does the spell Feather Fall prevent damage from falling down stairs?

Inspired by this Q&A: How to handle falling down stairs?

Feather fall says:

Choose up to five falling creatures within range. A falling creature’s rate of descent slows to 60 feet per round until the spell ends. If the creature lands before the spell ends, it takes no falling damage and can land on its feet, and the spell ends for that creature.

It has a casting time of 1 Reaction:

which you take when you or a creature within 60 feet of you falls.

In my answer to the above Q&A, I document three (stair) cases where the characters can fall down stairs and take damage.

From Tales from the Yawning Portal:

From Rime of the Frostmaiden:

From Rise of Tiamat:

In the example from Yawning Portal the word "falls" is used to describe our descent of the stairs. In the latter two examples, the word "tumbles" and the phrase "sliding and tumbling" are used instead. As noted in my answer to the linked question, the module guidance for falling down stairs is very similar to the usual rules for falling.

Does feather fall work to prevent falling-down-stairs damage?

How to handle falling down stairs?

It is well-established in fiction — as in real life — that falling down a flight of stairs is dangerous. A significant tumble can seriously injure or kill a person. "Pushed down a flight of stairs" is by now a hackneyed modus operandi in crime dramas. Recognizing that D&D is not a physics simulation, how should a DM model that danger?

Under normal falling rules, "[a] fall from a great height" deals 1d6 damage per 10 feet fallen. (PHB p. 183.) That wording seems to presume a freefall ending in a single, hard impact. Falling down stairs is at least arguably different: it doesn’t involve the same velocity, but it might involve a lot more bludgeoning.

Do the normal falling rules cover falling down stairs? Are there any alternative rules in published 5E materials? If it helps, our table does use the optional falling rules from Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, although so far we haven’t treated those rules as answering this question.

If wild shape ends by falling to 0 hp, does the druid lose concentration? [duplicate]

A druid that is wild shaped reverts "when" they drop to 0 hit points. Does that mean other effects that occur when a creature drops to 0 hit points also occur (though possibly in any order of the druid’s choice)? Specifically, if the druid were concentrating on a spell, would dropping to 0 hp – even momentarily – suffice to cause the druid to lose concentration by being incapacitated?

I can’t figure out what RAW or RAI is on this one – does anybody have any pointers (e.g. a rule or rule interaction I missed, or some sage advice)?

How far can a 9th level monk move along a vertical surfaces and across liquids without falling?

The monk class feature Unarmored Movement says:

At 9th level, you gain the ability to move along vertical surfaces and across liquids on your turn without falling during the move.

I am looking for an answer based in the rules as written, although interpretations and opinions are welcome.

I assert the rules support a notion of turns as meta-constructs useful for examining the game world at intervals, as opposed to a game world law of nature. As an example, if a character jumps and “runs out” of jump at the end of their turn while still jumping, I view the character as ending their round in mid-air, and that the jump gets continued on the character’s next turn. I don’t actually have rules citations to support my assertion, unfortunately.

This is important because I think it affects how far the monk can move along vertical or liquid surfaces. I don’t know how, though.

As an example, let’s assume a monk with 30′ movement is 10′ away from a 30′ wide body of water. The monk moves 10′ on land and then 20′ on water and then the monk’s turn is over. Does the monk fall in the water?

A slightly different example. Let’s assume the monk has 30′ of movement and is at the edge of a 1000′ wide body of water. How far can the monk move before falling in?

One answer might be the monk can move its movement, then it is no longer able to stay above the water and gets dunked. If this is the case, can the monk get back up on the water and keep moving?

One perhaps unintuitive answer is that there is actually no limit on how far the monk can move without falling, which means the monk could move across liquid until the monk needs to stop for some reason, say exhaustion, then they fall in.

Not to be absurd, but in this case, I think the monk could “ice” skate on the water, and do swirls and tricks and stuff. Okay, yes, that’s actually absurd.

To summarize: how far can a 9th level monk move along a vertical surfaces and across liquids without falling?

  1. to the end of the monk’s turn, then the monk needs to be on solid ground or fall

  2. the monk’s movement distance, even if that leaves the monk suspended on the vertical surface or the liquid between turns

  3. as far as the monk wants, as long as the monk keeps moving

  4. something else?

If a player who is flying is made to stop when does the falling damage happen? [duplicate]

If a player is flying in DnD and then for some reason is made to stop flying.

For instance a Druid in beast form if an eagle takes enough damage to drop eagle form, or a wizard flying due to an enchantment has that enchantment ended by an enemy or trap.

Are they considered to hit the ground immediately in the instance it happens or do they get an turn to try and do something about it? Is it dependant on how high they are, or where they come in initiative order?

Can a flying character choose to fall, and then use a reaction to stop falling before hitting the ground?

As a flying character there are a few scenarios that I’d like to know are valid/RAW, invalid, or up to the DM.

Assume in these scenarios that all characters fall at 1000ft/round (this is not up for discussion (no matter how strongly you feel about it) as my DM has made this ruling.) Also assume the fall is intentional (on my turn/not done by an enemy or enemy’s turn).

  1. Fly at 1,005ft, fall (drop prone?) in 1 round (1000ft), next round recover (stand up from prone), land safely or continue to fly.

  2. Fly at 600ft, fall, to 60ft recover to fly normally.

  3. Fly at 600ft, fall, to 60ft cast feather as a reaction to falling. This scenario could also include carrying a halfling (600ft), then dropping her, and she can cast feather fall (as a reaction) 60ft before hitting the ground.

Feel free to add additional cool scenarios that could work. Or if a scenario doesnt work, what would be needed to make it work.

If possible please use citations, especially if any of the scenarios are invalid/against the rules.

When a character with no fly speed ends their turn in the air, when should they start falling?

We had a situation last session where I (sorcerer/monk) ended my turn mid air after striking a flying monster trying to flee. It was already 100 feet high so I used a quickened Thunder Step to teleport 90 feet up on the wall and step of the wind to jump from it and strike the monster with two melee attacks. It wasn’t enough to finish it and I was left mid air.

I thought that I would immediately fall down and be okay since it’s a forced movements and thus does not trigger an Opportunity Attack and thanks to the Slow Fall feat I wouldn’t take too much damages. But The DM ruled it as the monster getting to hit me before I fall since his turn was next so I was knocked unconscious and died of the fall (no Slow Fall when you’re unconscious).

I’m not mad at the DM for making this choice, I knew it was a reckless action when I took it, but it got me thinking when should a character start falling when they ends their turn in the air.