Are there any PbtA games for Contemporary Fantasy and Magic?

I’m being (late) introduced to PbtA games and I’m looking for a Contemporary Fantasy and Magic option, something like Ars Magica, Mage The Ascension, Dresden Files?

Let me narrow down the question a bit…

I know we have Monsterhearts, but it is about relationships and lack Skins for magic users. What I am looking is something with more freedom (make your own spells) and combat/explosions or at least rituals.

I’m a huge fan of games likes Mage and Dresden Files, but I like how PbtA plays with conflicts and tests and I can imagine a 6- resulting in a chaotic backslash when failing to cast a spell.

Any PbtA game I can use for that?

What high-end fantasy fabrics and textiles exist in the Forgotten Realms?

Dungeons and Dragons has defined many fantastic and interesting metals (mythril, adamantine…) and leathers (dragon scales, Leather golem armour…). The lore also likes to call out food and drink as local specialty trade goods (Knucklehead Trout in Icewind Dale, or Crumblecake in Red Larch). It seems, however, that there are very few signature fabrics, like fancy silks or wools. I am not specifically looking for magical items or special effects, or any real game effect at all really.

What high end, fantastical materials for clothing exist in the lore of the Forgotten Realms?

I am currently running a game for a player who plays a weaver, and is looking for an interesting material to weave into a scarf for purely RP reasons. I can easily handwave Giant Spider Silk or Unicorn Hair, but I would be very interested to know about actual in-lore materials. The party is currently near Yartar, which has a bustling fashion and textile industry, so I can handwave that VERY exotic materials are imported at high cost, or sold on the black market.

Fantasy economy: how to design a deep, sophisticated crafting system?

I want to construct an immersive, complex and functional fantasy economy in order to inform my world-building process. I’m interested in finding a working economic model and applying that into low-tech, low-magic environments, similar to the authentic late medieval/early modern eras.

  1. What sorts of commodities and raw materials are out there and where to get them? A list of commodities would be great.
  2. How does trade and transportation (land and water) work, and what are the possible pitfalls of trading (taxes, bans on certain goods, robberies, etc.)?
  3. Crafting! How would you proceed in creating this sort of a complex, multilayered system, where raw materials are being converted into more polished materials using various vocations and techniques (which ones?)? How would you design a crafting system, where these commodities and materials are used to assemble finished products? How to fit in the price of labor, and the skill of rare artisans?

I’m looking for something of a complexity along the lines of the economic system of EVE Online. However, EVE Online is a computer game, and science fiction besides. I’m looking for something more varied, middle age-ish, with a personal touch, and that can account for differences based on the cultures participating in the whole trading system.

Do pocket watches exist and how much do they cost in d&d in the worlds of classic fantasy?

Do pocket watches exist, how much do they cost and how much do they weigh in d&d in the worlds of classic fantasy? Like Faerûn, Dragonlance, or Greyhawk? I am interested in the ability to track time up to a minute.

I have found the following comment of Ed Greenwood on sageadvice, according to which the wealthy merchants, nobles and warehousekeepers use pocket watches most often in the Realms, and that it is customary to wear watches on a chain around the neck, not on the wrist. But I could not find the recommended price and weight for a pocket watch in the official materials.

Editions from 2nd to 5th are of interest. If you manage to find this information, please mention to which edition the material that contains it belongs, if possible. Thanks.

Is there a plausible explanation for a large number of armed adventurers in a fantasy RPG setting?

I’m working on a Dungeons & Dragons setting. I’m looking for a comprehensive and logical explanation why, in a feudal society similar to Western Europe in the Middle Ages, there might be bands of armed adventurers (both male and female) wandering the country, slaying monsters, and frequenting taverns.

Does it follow that if you introduce magic and monsters guarding dungeons filled with treasure into a historical medieval setting, you’ll see an adventuring class emerge? Have there been any real world analogues to an “adventuring class” (obviously without the monsters and magic)?

Why has the Final Fantasy series largely changed for the worst (or JRPs/RPGs in general)?

From what many remembered as open-world, explorable, side-quest, challenging battles and tactics of many similar RPGS/JPRGs of the 90s to the 2000s even, it now largely seems like the genre — especially referencing to FF series since they are among the "top dogs" of it — have diminished. I get the impression that lots of what made the old games good is lost:

  1. What was once more explorable of a main navigation element seems to have become more centered, linear, and/or restrictive. You can have nicer walking animations and prettier backgrounds, but the same "tunnel" like forward direction — or more aimless all-way walking potential in huge open areas replaces that special emphasis on simple old rooms (often smaller) with less to give graphically but more to give in a travel, explorative or more sensible approach than just "hunting" or "running around and grinding." If you make a large area you should at least give different elements to it than just "lots of space." If you scale up you need more of that "something" to scale up too — otherwise it’s more empty.

  2. The old free-to-explore open-worlds/world maps, airship/flying ship/etc. mechanics (even re-visit mechanics) are almost always chopped down or implemented much less attractively (think how it started with FFX and then onwards — i.e. you can "explore" fast but it’s really largely watered down stuff/processes in doing such). The whole "open world" aspect to the classics is largely reduced to large areas/fields but no longer a blend of different terrains, sub-areas, sections or just the general nature/element of traveling/entering/exiting different areas rather than storyline/linear rules imposed on all areas/paths.

  3. The battle system is definitely a hot topic, as some will tell you the new mechanics add some new flesh to the table while others feel the older system worked best and it’s been "slaughtered" merely at the attempt of "spicing up" something that people already liked for the most part/settled in with over time. The thing is — if the battle system is to be made "better" so to speak — it should try and maintain the same elements of what the skeleton of original battle systems were based on. As an example old turn-based games kept the same skeleton even when becoming "active time" battles where it’s every turn to grab for themselves the quickest. The idea was that you can maintain the same "skeletal base" of the mechanics and only tweak them better — but lots of newer stuff almost always tries to go completely a new path that strays away from this with new experimentation, impositions, rules, and/or unneeded "extra steps" at times too. Basically it’s like the game’s old and functioning system has been put less concern to while trying to "splice" its old DNA under the impression that you can supposedly better an old thing by going in a completely a new "frankenstein" direction rather than just sprucing up the initial base in a more specific/oriented/targeted manner that fulfills its initial life blood/base than trying

  4. Always an extreme. Nowadays it seems games of this series are either too linear or not linear at all — there’s no longer a good balance between the two. For example one game may have so much explorable, massiveness to specific areas that you would be to get lost/tired/grinding excessively/etc. in one area to then go to the next one and rinse and repeat. On the other hand you can go super linear (think FFXIII for example) where everything is just "new area -> go straight -> battle -> story -> repeat" and such. What made the classics arguably more "wow" is the fact that the game — when it needs to — switches from storyline/linearity to open/some explorableness (to pique the natural exploring instinct) while going back to restriction when danger arose (defensive mechanism/protective inhibition) — because both of these angles match human behavior/etc. it suits gameplay. But if you make it either too open or too linear you force one side too long and it doesn’t align naturally with the cycle of human operability/engagement well enough to have proper "ups" and "downs."

  5. More "complex" systems or angles regarding leveling/power ups/etc. In old games it’s often fairly simple and straightforward to a large degree on how something more direct leads to a more expandable nature of said system to grow and keep delivering. What has replaced easy but expandable seems to be complex and rigid — more learning curves but less direction to go once you "have it." Slowly I think the series has gone this way, possibly starting with FFXIII/around that era. You make something simple that expands as needed become complex that really doesn’t give much over time. Something like junctioning in FF8 starts simple but can scale up to cool stuff as the game goes on, especially with the addition of GFs to character stats and so on. In a game like FFXIII for example you can liken the "powering system" to weak remnants of FFX and FFXII in ways of both combat means and stat growth.

  6. Games/scenes (probably applies to others outside this genre/series/etc. though) are now largely presented as cinematics/films with bits of gameplay as the only crux to break apart that concept of whether it’s innately a movie with gameplay or gameplay with cinematics (like older games of the series where "movies" in, say, the FMV form/class were much less emphasized as part of the overall game). "Cutscenes" in old FFs were mostly seamless or passive — now they are expected to emphasize more (due to the graphics) and "fill" a part of the game/impression as such rather than just be more of a seamless flow with only particular moments having more "weight" to them. In old FFs, how much of the story is lost removing the dialogue/locked moment/cutscenes? Now compare that to how much would be lost in modern games. If there is more to "lose" from the cutscenes overall then maybe they are relied on too much to shape the impression or experience of the game.

Kislevite Kossar encumbrance in Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay 2

We are planning on starting a new campaign of warhammer fantasy roleplay 2, using the encumbrance rules.
I wanted to play a Kislevite Kossar, but it turns out that the starting equipment seems way to heavy to carry as a new character.

As a Kossar, I’ll be starting the game with:

  • a great weapon (200),
  • a bow and 10 arrows (100),
  • a set of medium armour: Mail Coat (80), Leather Jack (50), and Leather Leggings (20)

Plus the stuff given to any new adventurer:

  • common clothes (15)
  • a dagger (10)
  • an hand axe (50)
  • a blanket (10) and set of wooden cutlery (2) Totalling more than 500 encumbrance.

Meanwhile, as an human, I’m supposed to have between 22 and 40 strength, meaning that my carrying capacity will be between 220 and 400.

As I understand it, I will get between -3 and -4 in movement penalty (-1 for being over my carrying capacity and between -2 and -3 for being more than 100/150 over the limit) so I will most likely be unable to move.

Am I missing something? Or are you supposed to only carry part of your starting equipment?
Is there a way (common houserule or whatever) to play a Kossar while using the encumbrance variant?

Multiplayer Game Books like Fighting Fantasy [closed]

I’m looking for game books that are similar to titles such as Warlock of Firetop Mountain or other Fighting Fantasy books except that they are meant for multiple players. Essentially, I’m looking for DM-less adventure books. Unfortunately, I can’t find any examples on Amazon or anything like that. Other things I’d be interested in checking out are rules-light games that accomplish the same premise such as a cards-based DM-less RPG like Expedition: The RPG Card Game. I just don’t know what’s out there or how to find it. Any help you can offer is appreciated!

Thank you!

A fantasy game with a good Noble class? [closed]

I’m looking for a system, class based preferably, which allows me to play a noble (i.e., the son of a lord baron, etc., forced to adventure). I am looking for something along the lines of SW Saga’s Noble class but in a fantasy environment. If you have a very good re-skinning of SW Saga for a fantasy game please share. The main things I’m looking for:

  • The class should model a noble from level 1, as it were, to where at level 10 you gain a castle and followers
  • The class should have explicit rules for interacting with non combat social challenges
  • The class should have explicit rules for interacting with my party members/henchmen so that I make them fight better i.e my most potent ability is leadership
  • Please no class like a bard where I have to strip out all the musician flavour but then I’m still stuck with a noble who is very very good at singing despite having no reason to be that good
  • Please no classes that would derive their authority from supernatural powers. Playing sorcerer kings descended from the dragons is fun, but not related to this question
  • An exception to the previous requirement is if I have powers to summon my ancestors who were they themselves nobles as a “magic in the blood” thing.

I’m interested in non-D&D systems.