Can a sorcerer learn a 5th-level spell early by creating spell slots using the Font of Magic feature?

Per the Font of Magic feature, sorcerer can use Flexible Casting to create 5th-level spell slots at level 7, even though they are not typically available until level 9.

You can transform unexpended sorcery points into one spell slot as a bonus action on your turn. The Creating Spell Slots table shows the cost of creating a spell slot of [5th level is 7]

If such a sorcerer levels up while still having this 5th-level spell slot, can they choose a 5th-level spell as the spell they gain upon levelling up?

The Spellcasting feature states:

Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the sorcerer spells you know and replace it with another spell from the sorcerer spell list, which also must be of a level for which you have spell slots.

Can one class’ feature help another class qualify for a feature?

It’s best to just give an example for this:

Let’s say I have levels in a rogue archetype that gives up Evasion, but I take a two level dip into monk to get Evasion. Would I qualify for the Improved Evasion advanced talent upon reaching rogue level 10? (yes, I know RAW Improved Evasion has no Evasion prerequisite but I doubt most GMs would let you get away with taking it without Evasion)

Or if I had levels in an alchemist archetype that gave up Mutagen, but took a dip in Mutagenic Mauler or Mutation Warrior, could I take alchemist discoveries that affect mutagens, as an alchemist, and apply them to the dip class’ Mutagen?

Does Unarmored Defense stack with a staff of power and the Bladesong class feature?

I’m playing a level 10 blade singer wizard with one level into barbarian for unarmored defense. I have a +5 Dex modifier, a +5 Int modifier, and a +4 Con modifier. I also have a staff of power that gives +2 to AC.

My total AC would be 4+5+10=19 from Unarmored Defense, +2 from the staff of power, and +5 from the Blade Singer arcane tradition, for a total of 19+2+5= 26 AC. Is my math correct?

Does the paladin’s Divine Health feature protect against both common and magical diseases?

By 3rd level, a Paladin gains the following ability (PHB, pg. 85):

Divine Health: The divine magic flowing through you makes you immune to disease.

Does this protect against both common AND magical disease?

There is no differentiation between the two. Disease is simply disease in the relevant entries (which I can’t find anymore). A few spells afflict you with disease; sickly common folk may be diseased, and certain magical aura’s on enemies may inflict a diseased state. Since these all count under the ‘Disease’ umbrella, and the Paladin trait simply says a magical energy is making you immune to disease… I assume this is read as “Immune to [all] disease.”

When I cast Simulacrum to make a copy of a creature with a feature like Rangers Companion, do I get a free animal companion to go with it?

The Simulacrum spell contains an interesting clause.

It appears to be the same as the original, but it has half the creature’s hit point maximum and is formed without any Equipment. Otherwise, the Illusion uses all the Statistics of the creature it duplicates.

Since the Companion feature is part of a creatures statistics, this means that it should get duplicated, I think. So if I were to duplicate a creature that has a feature like Rangers Companion (or something similar), does the animal companion automatically come with it?

Related questions that would have an answer based on the answer to the primary question:

  • If we don’t get a free companion, can the simulacra bond with a new one?

  • If we do get one, would it also be an illusion, or is it a real flesh-and-blood creature?

  • If the Simulacra dies, does the companion instantly die as well?

  • If the companion dies, can the Simulacra bond with a new companion?

Can a Circle of the Shepherd druid in Wild Shape still communicate with beasts using the Speech of the Woods feature?

The Circle of the Shepherd druid has the Speech of the Woods feature (XGtE, p. 23):

You learn to speak, read, and write Sylvan. In addition, beasts can understand your speech, and you gain the ability to decipher their noises and motions.

One of the restrictions of the Wild Shape feature is:

You can’t cast spells, and your ability to speak or take any action that requires hands is limited to the capabilities of your beast form.

Related question: Can a druid speak while in wild-shape?

Depending how you parse Speech of the Woods, either you can speak Sylvan and beasts can understand you when you speak Sylvan (at which point this question is moot) – or you can speak Sylvan, and separately, beasts can understand your speech, presumably in any language you choose.

So if the druid wild shapes into a wolf, they can only speak “like a wolf” (fairly limited). But they can also decipher the noises and motions of a wolf, and wolves can understand their “speech”, however that is defined.

Am I trying too hard to suggest that the druid can communicate with other beasts when in beast form? Or at least other beasts of the same species?

How much does this Favored Foe tweak for the Ranger’s class feature from TCoE buffs the Rangers when compared to other martial classes?


I want to tweak the Favored Foe optional class feature for the Ranger from Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything

I’m fairly disappointed with the Favored Foe optional class feature for the Rangers released in TCoE, it’s essentially just a worse Hunter’s Mark. This feature allows more versatility with your Foe Slayer feature at level 20, but it also locks your concentration. Since it’s a worse Hunter’s Mark, Favored Foe will probably see less use until you get Foe Slayer (and how many games reach level 20?). The only saving grace to this feature is the improved action economy. Two weapon fighting or crossbow expert Rangers might see some use out of this.

While the UA version is definitely better in terms of damage, I’d have to agree with this Reddit post that says that the UA version incentivizes 1 level dip to the Ranger class, but doesn’t incentivize more levels in Ranger. User u/ZatherDaFox added "One of the ranger’s biggest issues has always been a lack of really cool mid and late game abilities to justify taking the class that high."

Now, I’m trying to come up with a solution after Favored Foe was officially published in Tasha’s Caudron of Everything. tl;dr, here’s the changelog:

  • Renamed it to Hunter’s Mark
  • If you take this optional class feature, it replaces your Favored Enemy class feature and removes the Hunter’s Mark spell from this Ranger’s spell list
  • The damage still scales exactly the same as TCoE’s Favored Foe, but now it applies to every attack that hits (even spell attacks)
  • Added the advantage to track and find it bit from the Hunter’s Mark spell
  • Duration is 1 hour, following the Hunter’s Mark spell
  • Number of uses equal to proficiency bonus per short or long rest
  • At level 11, it no longer requires concentration

Hunter’s Mark

1st-level ranger feature, which replaces the Favored Enemy feature and works with the Foe Slayer feature. Furthermore, Hunter’s Mark is removed from your spell list.

When you hit a creature with an attack roll, you can call on your mystical bond with nature to mark the target as your favored enemy for 1 hour or until you lose your concentration (as if you were concentrating on a spell). Until your concentration ends, you deal an extra 1d4 damage to the target whenever you hit it with an attack, and you have advantage on any Wisdom (Perception) or Wisdom (Survival) check you make to find it.
    You can use this feature to mark a favored enemy a number of times equal to your proficiency bonus, and you regain all expended uses when you finish a short or long rest. This feature’s extra damage increases when you reach certain levels in this class: to 1d6 at 6th level and to 1d8 at 14th level. Furthermore, once you have reached 11th level in this class, this feature no longer requires concentration.

What this aims to fix:

As stated before, I want people to want to play the Ranger class and experience them at higher levels, not just as one level dips. I play a Ranger in my homebrew campaign, but I use the Revised Ranger UA version because the PHB just seems very DM-/campaign-dependent and, to me at least, is poorly designed compared to the other classes. Tasha’s has introduced a lot of new optional class features for the Ranger that I’m eternally grateful for (I’ll literally never take the PHB Natural Explorer ever again). So it sucks to see that one of them just barely misses the mark (get it? Hahah).

The changes don’t really alter the playstyle of the Ranger prior to level 11, I think. I set the uses at PB per short or long rest since this Hunter’s Mark can’t jump between targets when you reduce one to 0 hit points. And every Rangers still need to contemplate the usual "do I drop my Hunter’s Mark now and try something different, or should I stick with it?" This has always been a problem with me in my campaign, and in its current state I do plan on multiclassing into Rogue very soon, since I don’t think I can utilize many spells because my Wisdom is not that high. I know that sounds more like a me thing but Wisdom is not generally the Ranger’s main ability score either, so it’s usually lower than their Dexterity, de-incentivizing creative uses of spells with a saving throw or a to-hit.

This changes in level 11, though. This Ranger’s Hunter’s Mark now no longer requires concentration. I read somewhere (can’t find it anymore) that advised people who wants to homebrew stuff to stay away from altering the concentration mechanic in D&D 5e, among other things (action economy was also mentioned). I removed the concentration at level 11 because it’s entering a new tier of play, so I think it’s a fitting jump in terms of prowess for this class. Also, since it no longer requires concentration at this level, Rangers can now try more experiments with their spells! It removes one decision point in combat for the Ranger, which I think is a good thing.

The Ranger’s current level 11 class feature is tied to their subclass, so this adds another oomph to those as well. But, I am also deathly afraid that messing with concentration like this is going to overpower the Ranger when compared to the other martial classes. My biggest argument is that the Paladin gets Improved Divine Smite also at 11th level, which is very similar to this Hunter’s Mark since it a straight damage buff.

tl;dr, the question: do these changes for Favored Foe, now renamed Hunter’s Mark, significantly buffs the Rangers, to the point of overpowered when compared to the other martial classes?

Can the Necromancy wizard’s Command Undead feature be used on the Nightwalker from Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes?

The School of Necromancy wizard has the Command Undead feature (PHB, p. 119):

Starting at 14th level, you can use magic to bring undead under your control, even those created by other wizards. As an action, you can choose one undead that you can see within 60 feet of you. That creature must make a Charisma saving throw against your wizard spell save DC. If it succeeds, you can’t use this feature on it again. If it fails, it becomes friendly to you and obeys your commands until you use this feature again.

Intelligent undead are harder to control in this way. If the target has an Intelligence of 8 or higher, it has advantage on the saving throw. If it fails the saving throw and has an Intelligence of 12 or higher, it can repeat the saving throw at the end of every hour until it succeeds and breaks free.

The Nightwalker from Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes (p. 216) has 8 charisma, 6 intelligence and a CR of 20.

Isn’t it a bit crazy? Outside of simply not putting this thing in the game if you have a necromancy wizard in it, what else can happen (or can the DM do) that is gonna prevent the game from breaking?

How does the Order of Scribes feature Awakened Spellbook work with multiple damage types?

Awakened Spellbook, a level 3 Order of Scribes feature, says the following:

When you cast a wizard spell with a spell slot, you can temporarily replace its damage type with a type that appears in another spell in your spellbook, which magically alters the spell’s formula for this casting only. The latter spell must be of the same level as the spell slot you expend.

If I cast a spell that deals multiple damage types, for example Ice Knife (https://www.dndbeyond.com/spells/ice-knife), how does this work? Could I change both damage types to a different type (for example force damage on initial hit, fire damage on burst) or only the same damage (force damage on both damage rolls). Also, could I switch the two damage types inside the spell, having cold damage on initial hit, and piercing damage on the burst?

Does the Hexblade Warlock’s Hex Warrior feature apply to a magic weapon that is transformed into your Pact Weapon?

The Hexblade Warlock’s Hex Warrior feature states (emphasis mine):

[…] If you later gain the Pact of the Blade feature, this benefit extends to every pact weapon you conjure with that feature, no matter the weapon’s type.

Meanwhile, the Pact of the Blade Warlock feature states:

[…] You can transform one magic weapon into your pact weapon by performing a special ritual while you hold the weapon. You perform the ritual over the course of 1 hour, which can be done during a short rest. You can then dismiss the weapon, shunting it into an extradimensional space, and it appears whenever you create your pact weapon thereafter. […]

Does a magic weapon that you have transformed into your pact weapon benefit from Hex Warrior?
Does it count as a weapon you have conjured using Pact of the Blade?
Does the answer change if you shunt the weapon away and then make it appear afterwards?