What’s with these pointless empty log files? And why does the csvlog mode create plaintext ones too?

I’ve been fighting for days now just to get god damn logging set up. I’ve had to write a ton of code manually because PG doesn’t provide any automated mechanism to do this, for some reason, nor even tells you anything, beyond this: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/12/runtime-config-logging.html#RUNTIME-CONFIG-LOGGING-CSVLOG

I have:

  1. Set up the postgres_log table exactly like it says on that page.
  2. Set up my postgresql.conf like this (also as it says on the page, except it only describes it vaguely and lets me find out everything on my own):
log_destination = 'csvlog' logging_collector = on log_directory = 'C:\pglogs' # Yes, I requires double \ chars or else it removes them entirely... log_filename = 'PG_%Y-%m-%d_%H;%M;%S' log_rotation_age = 1min log_rotation_size = 0 log_truncate_on_rotation = on 
  1. Coded my own mechanism to constantly go through C:\pglogs for any .csv file, skipping any ones that PG reports are already in use with pg_current_logfile, feed them into PG’s table and then delete the file. This took me a huge amount of time and effort and not a word about it was mentioned in that "manual".

Questions:

  1. PostgreSQL creates both PG_2020-09-20_00;56;19.csv (in CSV format) and PG_2020-09-20_00;56;19 (in plaintext format) files. I obviously don’t want the extensionless files. Why are they created?
  2. Every minute (as specified) PG creates new log files, even if there’s nothing new to log. This results in an endless stream of empty log files (which my custom script goes through, "imports" and then deletes). How do I tell PG to stop doing that? It seems like pointless wear & tear on my disk to make empty files which are just deleted seconds later by my ever-running script.
  3. Why isn’t all of this automated? Why do I have to spend so much time to manually cobble together a solution to import the CSV files back into PG? In fact, why are they dumped to CSV files in the first place? Why doesn’t PG have the ability to directly log into that database table? It seems like a pointless exercise to dump CSV files which are only going to be COPYied back into the database and then deleted.

How exactly does PostgreSQL expect me to read in/delete the CSV log files?

I’ve been following the (very sparse and cryptic) instructions here: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/12/runtime-config-logging.html#RUNTIME-CONFIG-LOGGING-CSVLOG

  1. I’ve set up the postgres_log table exactly like it says on that page.

  2. I’ve set up my postgresql.conf like this:

    log_destination = ‘csvlog’

    logging_collector = on

    log_directory = ‘C:\pglogs’

    log_filename = ‘PG_%Y-%m-%d_%H;%M;%S’

    log_rotation_age = 1d

    log_rotation_size = 0

    log_truncate_on_rotation = on

  3. I’ve restarted PostgreSQL, and it has created a PG_2020-09-20_00;56;19.csv and PG_2020-09-20_00;56;19 file.

  4. I am able to successfully run a COPY query to import the PG_2020-09-20_00;56;19.csv into my database table, if I explicitly name it.

My problems:

  1. How am I supposed to determine which filename(s) to pick to COPY into the table from my automated, regularly run script? (Since it can’t be the "current" one.)
  2. After I have somehow determined which filename(s) are safe to COPY in, and I’ve loaded them into my table, am I expected to delete these myself?
  3. What’s with the plaintext-format PG_2020-09-20_00;56;19 file? Why is that created when I clearly tell PG to use CSV?

None of this is addressed on the page I linked to and which I’ve been following.

How to protect IP-sensitive data in files generated and used by users

I’m working on an offline windows application that generates and loads key results as files. However, these files provide key insights into how our product works internally. To make matters worse my users will for sure be tech-savvy but not hacker like tech-savvy. So if I do not encode it, we give away our magic. So given this problem, I have some questions:

  • Is there an encryption method commonly used to make files unreadable (or at least hard to read) except for (multiple instances of) a certain application?
  • How hard is it to read what assets (like private keys) are baked into a .dll file?

How hidden is “Hidden” in Dresden Files

Sally the thief sees guardsman Bob. They are in the same zone, Sally having just rounded the corner. By default, both are aware of each other. If Sally rolls a block using stealth against Bob’s Alertness, then the Bob does not see her. On the other hand, Sally could maneuver, trying to place the aspect "Hidden" on Bob. This would let her tag Hidden later, probably for some kind of sneak attack.

I have a Stealth-focused character in my campaign. She has been using the first, then the second, in order. Last session, she asked what happens if she skips that first step. My ruling at the time was that she was staying in shadows or otherwise concealing herself, but that the guard knew that somebody was there. She could invoke that aspect to disappear completely from view, representing his losing track of her.

Thinking about it, I’m not sure about this. Should someone who has the aspect "Hidden" be completely unknown? When I have NPCs hiding from players, I tell the players who’s hiding from them and usually where they are, and trust the players to stay in character. (It usually works pretty well.) That gets run as a block, and they tend to place the aspect "Concealed" when they’re darting around shadows making a hard target of themselves. On the other hand, someone with the aspect "on fire" is still on fire, whether compelled or not – they just don’t have any mechanics associated with this. So someone who was "Hidden" could still be unseen.

How should these different versions of hidden be handled?

git reflog is showing plain text password used as a secret texts or files in Jenkins

We are using Jenkins Freestyle Project to the push the changes on the remote server. We are executing shell script on remote host using ssh for it. To pull the changes on remote host, we are using origin url with git username and git password. The credentials should not be visible in plain text in the url that’s why we have stored them in variables using ‘secret text(s) or file(s)’ option of ‘Build Environment’.

The git credentials are not visible to the users who are using Jenkins for other projects but the remote server is showing git credentials in plain text. Any user with ssh access of the remote server is able to run the git reflog command in the project directory.

Port 22 cannot be opened on the server where gitlab is deployed so we cannot use ssh keys method to create the build in Jenkins. We can use only http method to pull the changes.

Is there any way so we could implement to avoid showing the git credentials in plain text in the project directory.

moving files from veracrypt store logs on windows?

If i move a file from an non-hidden encrypted drive to my main C drive, then move the original file to a hidden container on the encrypted drive, then wipe the original file with ccenhancer/secure erase, is that doing enough to ensure the original location isnt Knowles? Or does windows log moved files by default and someone could tell if the copied file came from the encrypted drive? Additionally, do softwares like ccenhancer/secure erase remove "recently viewed" logs from applications in case they are opened from either hidden or non hidden volume?

Hey guys im practicing BATCH files by making a simple multitool… but my file closes as soon as its opened


Heading ##im not sure why it keeps closing and would like some help in the comments

@echo off color fc title CockBall V2 Multitool echo      CCCCC                kk     BBBBB           lll lll  VV     VV  2222    echo     CC    C  oooo    cccc kk  kk BB   B    aa aa lll lll  VV     VV 222222 echo     CC      oo  oo cc     kkkkk  BBBBBB   aa aaa lll lll   VV   VV      222  echo     CC    C oo  oo cc     kk kk  BB   BB aa  aaa lll lll    VV VV    2222    echo      CCCCC   oooo   ccccc kk  kk BBBBBB   aaa aa lll lll     VVV    2222222  :menu echo 1 pScan echo 2 LanC echo 3 IP Stresser echo 4 info echo 5 ping (for testing ip) choice /n /:12345 /M "Choose something.. tf you think you do?" GOTO LABEL-%ERRORLEVEL% :LABEL-1 pScan start Pscan.exe goto menu :LABEL-2 LanC start LancV2.exe goto menu :LABEL-3 IP Stesser start CockBallPinger.exe goto menu :LABEL-4 info echo made by jagli xd echo helped by: nobody echo Private Multitool goto menu 

:LABEL-5 ping (for testing ip) set /p yee=Enter ip for test: ping %yee% -l 65500 goto menu