Can Living Gloves combined with Remove Curse be used to gain access to multiple artisan tool skills?

Living Gloves (p278 ERftLW) Says:

While attuned to these gloves, you gain one of the following proficiencies (your choice when you attune to the gloves):

  • Sleight of Hand
  • Thieves’ tools
  • One kind of artisan’s tools of your choice
  • One kind of musical instrument of your choice

Symbiotic Nature. The gloves can’t be removed from you while you’re attuned to them, and you can’t voluntarily end your attunement to them. If you’re targeted by a spell that ends a curse, your attunement to the gloves ends, and they can be removed.

Can remove curse (p271 PHB) be used to end the curse, then you can put the gloves back on to attune once again and choose a different proficiency?

Is using stunting and pranks to gain advantage instead of stealth mechanically sound?

I would like to break the stereotype that rogues are always super stealthy sneaky types that appear from the shadows and strike and then disappear, for me that makes the flavor of the game not as fun and reduces the amount of decision making in-game. This is the reason I haven’t considered playing rogue ever.

I am selecting the thief rogue archetype in order to be able to take advantage of the use an object bonus action, and combine it with free actions for maximum effectiveness to allow for stunting and debuffing to gain the advantage required for sneak attacks. Is this a mechanically sound way to reliably trigger sneak attacks?

Ways this could potentially be implemented in practice:

  • Throwing dust into the eyes of an enemy
  • Using tinderbox to light their clothing, hair, or fur on fire
  • Using ten foot pole or quarter staff to poke and harass them
  • Using ropes and whips to attempt to trip them up or lasso them
  • Throwing caltrops, ball bearings, or oil, under their feet
  • Pantsing them or messing with their clothing in a similar way

Is there any way to gain the endless special quality without carrying around a small necromantic magic item?

Dragon Magazine #354 has a fairly well-known special quality called endless, which prevents aging and all its normal effects, but is unfortunately not actually granted by its associated feat, Wedded to History. Within the pages of this magazine, the only way to gain the quality (DM fiat aside) is to have someone cast kissed by the ages on you, and then to forevermore give up a magical item body slot and risk taking a penalty if you ever lose the item–which also radiates enough necromancy to make many NPCs very uneasy.

But what about methods outside the pages of the magazine? Is there any sort of feat, feature, or other special means by which someone can gain this extraordinary special quality, without needing to go around holding a pseudo-phylactery?

Does a “Thief Racket” Rogue gain an ability score boost to Dexterity at creation?

At character creation, the rogue class says under Key Ability : Dexterity or Other At 1st level, your class gives you an ability boost to Dexterity or an option from rogue’s racket.

Now, the thief racket allows such a rogue to use dexterity to deal damage with finesse weapons, and my interpretation was that such ability replaced the ability boost (which seemed balanced at first; a Thief would use Dexterity for hit/damage and AC after all, letting the character concentrate on a single ability score without being a caster). But recently I’ve seen the iconic rogue character sheet, and it seems that, as a thief rogue, the character’s Dexterity was 18+. So that’s it, is the iconic character sheet wrong? Or does the thief rogue keep the Dexterity ability boost?

Can a Sorcerer Gain Additional Spells Known with Magic Initiate? [duplicate]

The Magic Initiate feat states:

Choose a class: bard, cleric, druid, sorcerer, warlock, or wizard. You learn two cantrips of your choice from that class’s spell list.

In addition, choose one 1st-level spell from that same list. You learn that spell and can cast it at its lowest level. Once you cast it, you must finish a long rest before you can cast it again using this feat.

Assume a character is a 4th level sorcerer, elects to take this feat, and chooses Sorcerer. Per the feat, they now ‘learn that spell’. Also they can cast the spell for free once per day using the feat, but can they continue to cast the spell using their spell slots?

Additionally, can they replace that spell when they reach 5th level as a sorcerer per the Spells Known feature?:

Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the sorcerer spells you know and replace it with another spell from the sorcerer spell list, which also must be of a level for which you have spell slots.

Detecting conservation, loss, or gain in a crafting game with items and recipes

Suppose we’re designing a game like Minecraft where we have lots of items $ i_1,i_2,…,i_n\in I$ and a bunch of recipes $ r_1,r_2,…,r_m\in R$ . Recipes are functions $ r:(I\times\mathbb{N})^n\rightarrow I\times\mathbb{N}$ , that is they take some items with non-negative integer weights and produce an integer quantity of another item.

For example, the recipe for cake in Minecraft is:

3 milk + 3 wheat + 2 sugar + 1 egg $ \rightarrow$ 1 cake

… and the recipe for torches is:

1 stick + 1 coal $ \rightarrow$ 4 torches

Some recipes could even be reversible, for example: 9 diamonds $ \leftrightarrow$ 1 diamond block

If there’s some combination of recipes we can repeatedly apply to get more of the items that we started with then the game is poorly balanced and this can be exploited by players. It’s more desirable that we design the game with recipes that conserve items or possibly lose some items (thermodynamic entropy in the real world – you can’t easily un-burn the toast).

Is there an efficient algorithm that can decide if a set of recipes will:

  • conserve items?
  • lose items to inefficiency?
  • gain items?

Is there an efficient algorithm that can find the problematic recipes if a game is imbalanced?

My first thoughts are that there is a graph structure / maximum flow problem here but it’s very complex, and that it resembles a knapsack problem. Or maybe it could be formulated as a SAT problem – this is what I’m considering to code it at the moment but something more efficient might exist.

We could encode recipes in a matrix $ \mathbf{R}^{m \times n}$ where rows correspond to recipes and columns correspond to items. Column entries are negative if an item is consumed by a recipe, positive if it’s produced by the recipe, and zero if it’s unused. Similar to a well known matrix method for graph cycle detection, we could raise $ \mathbf{R}$ to some high power and get sums of each row to see if item totals keep going up, stay balanced, or go negative. However, I’m not confident this always works.

Any discussion, code, or recommended reading is very appreciated.

Do characters in DnD 5E ever gain new skills/proficiencies?

folks. I feel like I’m missing something super simple, so I want to ask. Do player characters in Dungeons and Dragons fifth edition ever freely learn new skills/proficiencies? From what I can see, most classes get two or four proficiency skills to start, and backgrounds provide two more. Some class specializations provide a new proficiency in a tool or with a stat. But I can’t seem to find anything to indicate that a PC can decide to learn a new skill that they feel suits their character’s developments. Something analogous to ‘cross class skills’ from old editions.

In other words, if a rogue character doesn’t select “Sleight of Hand” as a proficiency at first level, they’ll literally never gain that proficiency.

Again, this is probably a stupid question, so if I’m missing something go easy on me. Thanks.