Does the Dual Wielder feat work with the Armorer’s Thunder Gauntlets?

Can you do this to do bonus action attacks as an armorer?

The Dual Wielder feat grants the following:

You gain a +1 bonus to AC while you are wielding a separate melee weapon in each hand.

You can use two-weapon fighting even when the one handed melee weapons you are wielding aren’t light.

The Thunder Gauntlets are described as follows:

Each of the armor’s gauntlets counts as a simple melee weapon while you aren’t holding anything in it, and it deals 1d8 thunder damage on a hit.

Are punches with Gauntlets of Ogre Strength magical, improvised weapon attacks?

My Gnoll Paladin just got the Gauntlets of Ogre Strength from Phandelver the other day, and it got me wondering:

  1. Would it be possible/make sense for punches using them to count as an improvised weapon? (Since I’m not punching with empty fists, I’m wearing magical gauntlets)
  2. If so, would punches from a person using them count as magical weapon damage?

Do the Gauntlets of Flaming Fury infuse ranged weapon ammunition with magical properties?

The description of the Gauntlets of Flaming Fury says:

While you wear both of these steel gauntlets, any non-magical weapon you grasp with either gauntlet is treated as a magic weapon.

Does this property infuse both a ranged weapon and the ammunition being fired with this magical property, or just the ranged weapon and not the ammunition?

Does Arcane Armor provide gauntlets?

The Armorer subclass of Artificer has the Arcane Armorer feature which gives the option for:

Thunder Gauntlets. Each of the armor’s gauntlets counts as a simple melee weapon while you aren’t holding anything in it, and it deals 1d8 thunder damage on a hit.

However not every type of armor includes gauntlets. The Breastplate for example makes no mention of gauntlets in its description.

If your armor does not include gauntlets and you use the guardian form for your Arcane Armor would you create your own gauntlets or would you be unable to use Thunder Gauntlets?

Related:
Can you infuse a breastplate with Arcane Propulsion Armor

Propulsion Armor Infusion and Thunder Gauntlets

Do the effects of the Thunder Gauntlets from the Armorer Artificer subclass stack with the effects of the Propulsion Armor gauntlets from the Propulsion Armor Infusion considering that they’re the same pair of gauntlets and thus a hit from the gauntlets triggers both conditions?

Some people have told me that it’s similar to AC calculations where you only choose one but that is an explicit rule for AC calculations that doesn’t have a counterpart for weapons and neither feature mentions being able to choose which effect occurs.

Do the gauntlets of flaming fury add 1d6 of fire damage to magical weapons?

The item’s description reads

While you wear both of these steel gauntlets, any non- magical weapon you grasp with either gauntlet is treated as a magic weapon. As a bonus action, you can use the gauntlets to cause magical flames to envelop one or two melee weapons in your grasp. Each flaming weapon deals an extra 1d6 fire damage on a hit. The flames last until you sheath or let go of either weapon. Once used, this property can’t be used again until the next dawn. Source: BGDIA, page 223

Now the first part is clear that it makes non-magic weapons magic, but does the second part using a bonus action to add 1d6 fire damage apply only if the weapons are non-magic to start? I.E. If I wield a +1 short sword would I roll 1d6 slashing +1d6 fire +1 for damage or just 1d6 slashing +1?

Do the Gauntlets of Blazing Fury make Improvised Weapons magical?

The Gauntlets of Blazing Fury, a magic item in a D&D 5th Edition adventure, have the following property amongst others:

While you wear both of these steel gauntlets, any non-magical weapon you grasp with either gauntlet is treated as a magic weapon.

Would those Gauntlets make Improvised Weapons be treated as magical?

Reminder on Improvised Weapons rules:

Sometimes characters don’t have their weapons and have to attack with whatever is at hand. An improvised weapon includes any object you can wield in one or two hands, such as broken glass, a table leg, a frying pan, a wagon wheel, or a dead goblin.

Often, an improvised weapon is similar to an actual weapon and can be treated as such. For example, a table leg is akin to a club. At the DM’s option, a character proficient with a weapon can use a similar object as if it were that weapon and use his or her proficiency bonus.