Can Mage Hand wield a Shield?

I’m a caster with Mage Hand, and am wondering if I could use it with a regular Shield to create an ad-hoc Floating Shield.

I ask because:

  • Shields provide +2 AC but weigh 6lbs
  • Mage hand has a weight limit of 10lbs, and a range of 30ft

Would this provide an extra 2 AC to me so long as I have it floating in the same space as myself?

If I move it into an ally’s space, would they then get the 2 AC bonus? What if they’re already wielding a shield themselves?

Do you need a free hand to Shove?

I don’t know if I’m crazy or what, but if you had asked me "Do you need a free hand to Shove?" I would answered with a resounding of course before I reread the PHB and noticed it said nothing of the sort. It specifically mentions you need a free hand for grappling, you need a free hand for somatic components (feats notwithstanding) and well, seems to me like adventurers cannot normally juggle more than one thing per hand. Is this an oversight for a tacit rule (therefore yes, you can only do one thing with each hand, and wielding a weapon prevents any other use), or there’s a rational reason for which you can shove a creature when you are duel-wielding daggers I’m missing, or does it make sense in-game for balancing reasons I can’t see…? Help me out here

How do I recalibrate this encounter from Red Hand of Doom for 5th Edition D&D?

I’m running D&D3.5e’s Red Hand of Doom updated for 5e. So far it has been effortlessly straightforward. I’ve been keeping the basic combat encounter structures and simply swapping out 3.5e monsters for similarly-named 5e monsters (3.5e hobgoblins for 5e hobgoblins, 3.5e manticores for 5e manticores, etc.). Likewise, I’ve been winging skill checks and other non-combat challenges just by eyeballing how hard the stated 3.5e DCs likely would’ve been and using my best judgment to apply 5e DCs of roughly similar probability given bounded accuracy.

However, the PCs are coming up on a critical encounter with a major non-combat objective that presents special conversion problems. The encounter in question, arising near the end of Part I, is

Because this objective isn’t a monster, I can’t simply turn to stock 5e monsters and assume all the calibration will have been done for me. At the same time, it’s not as simple as a skill check that I can just eyeball. RHoD provides 3.5e combat statistics for the objective (see p. 34-35), but I’m not sure how those statistics translate to 5e. As written, the objective has what I perceive to be an outsize pile of HP, plus additional defensive features (taking reduced damage from certain sources, etc.) arising from how 3.5e treated entities in the nature of this objective. It’s not clear whether, or how, 5e might expect me to recalibrate those statistics and features.

That is problem enough, but RHoD also goes out of its way to enumerate 3.5e spells that can interact effectively with the objective — most of which are either unavailable or fundamentally changed in 5e. To wit:

  • Soften earth and stone does not exist in 5e.
  • 5e’s version of stone shape restricts the effected area to "no more than 5 feet in any direction," which was not a limitation of the 3.5e version.
  • Stone to flesh does not exist in 5e.
  • Transmute rock does exist in 5e and is substantially more useful in that it applies to any nonmagical rock, rather than only natural, unworked rock as did the 3.5e version. The 5e version could probably deal with the objective in a single turn, whereas RHoD says the 3.5e version just dealt some modest damage if used in a particular way.

Given the different combat mechanics and spell functions between 3.5e and 5e, how do I convert this encounter so it remains an appropriate challenge?

(In case context is helpful, the party is level 5 and comprises a Light cleric, a Hunter ranger, a melee-heavy Battlemaster fighter, and an Abjuration wizard. Despite RHoD being written for 3.5e parties starting at level 6, up to this point these 5th-level PCs have been able to handle the encounters in Part I of the adventure.)

Does Molten Silver Strike or Steady hand allow Whirlpool strike to have higher range?

Molten Silver Strike allows to add Solar Wind boosts to Mithral Current attacks and adds +5ft/4init level to their range. Whirlpool strike allows you to attack every enemy in your weapons reach. Steady Hand (Solar) adds 30 ft range to your attack. Do they work together to allow you to attack everyone in 35+ range?

How does additional damage work with the Hand Mortar’s explosive property?

So I am building a gunslinger, and see a possible very high risk, but very high reward tactic for large groups.

Say I have a hand mortar, and fire it into a creature surrounded by at least 2 others. The hand mortar has the explosive property

Explosive. Upon a hit, everything within 5 ft of the target must make a Dexterity saving throw (DC equal to 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Dexterity modifier) or suffer 1d8 fire damage. If the weapon misses, the ammunition fails to detonate, or bounces away harmlessly before doing so.

Now say I choose to spend 2 grit points on the Violent Shot trick shot.

When you make a firearm attack against a creature, you can expend one or more grit points to enhance the volatility of the attack. For each grit point expended, the attack gains a +2 to the firearm’s misfire score. If the attack hits, you can roll one additional weapon damage die per grit point spent when determining the damage.

Does this mean that if I hit and do not misfire (roll above a 7, and above the main target’s AC) I deal 6d8 + DEX fire damage to the main target AND a potential 3d8 fire damage to the creature around the target, or does the "splash damage" not count as weapon damage?

This is entirely based on the DnD beyond Gunslinger subclass definition.

Does a wizard need to hold a component pouch or focus in one hand in order for it to work?

One of my PCs is a (weird) wizard who is frequently switching quickly between items—one turn he’s wielding a quarterstaff two-handed, the next he’s got a component pouch and a dagger, and after that, he’s going back to the two-handed quarterstaff to prepare for an attack of opportunity.

We often find ourselves in situations where we’re not sure if the rules on action economy actually allow for him to cast some of these spells. For clarification, this question is two-fold:

  • If a focus is merely worn, can a wizard still cast his spells?
  • If it fits, can the wizard hold a component or focus in the same hand that performs somatic components?

Can Bigby’s Hand move creatures that are Grappled into the air?

Bigby’s hand can grapple via Grasping Hand. This allows:

The hand attempts to grapple a Huge or smaller creature within 5 feet of it. You use the hand’s Strength score to resolve the grapple. If the target is Medium or smaller, you have advantage on the check. While the hand is grappling the target, you can use a bonus action to have the hand crush it. When you do so, the target takes bludgeoning damage equal to 2d6 + your spellcasting ability modifier.

With a strength of 26, can it move creatures? Not only do you get the action, but you can:

When you cast the spell and as a bonus action on your subsequent turns, you can move the hand up to 60 feet and then cause one of the following effects with it.

So, after a grapple, could I move it 60′ in the air? Then next turn move it another 60′ and cause the crushing damage? At some point while it’s way up in the air, release the grappled creature for falling damage?

Differences between Mage Hand, Unseen Servant and Find Familiar [closed]

I’m playing LMoP at the moment as a player and I’m trying to see reasons why a player would choose Unseen Servant over Find Familiar. Related question – what makes Unseen Servant worth taking instead of Mage Hand?

Here’s a small comparison table I’ve created when I was trying to figure it out. I do understand that different DMs can rule things differently, but still I’m looking for opinions.

Mage Hand Unseen Servant Find Familiar
Casting time action action/10 minutes 1 hour
Casting cost 0 gp 0 gp 10 gp
Duration 1 minute 1 hour until killed/dispelled
Command time action bonus action free action
Multiple no yes no
Help action no no yes
Carrying capacity 10 lbs 60 lbs 90 lbs (depends on Str)
Movement 30 ft 15 ft 60 ft
Separate initiative no no yes
Scout no no yes
Drop items in combat yes yes yes
Open doors yes yes no
Delivering spells no no yes
Invisible no yes no

Can a Sorcerer Twin Telekinesis, Eyebite, and Bigby’s Hand?

Telekinesis, Eyebite, and Bigby’s Hand are some of the few spells which persistently affect one creature. As such, they appear to fit the requirements of Twinned spell, which are…

Twinned Spell: When you Cast a Spell that Targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in range with the same spell (1 sorcery point if the spell is a cantrip).

To be eligible, a spell must be incapable of targeting more than one creature at the spell’s current level. For example, Magic Missile and Scorching Ray aren’t eligible, but Ray of Frost is.

Bigby’s Hand, Eyebite, and Telekinesis are all incapable of targeting more than one creature at a time at any level. This leads to…Difficulties…interpreting then. Can you even twin them? If you can twin them, how do you target them on future turns? Can you cause different effects to different targets on each turn, per Eyebite or Bigby’s?

I included Bigby’s because of multiclassing.