Are common potions of healing considered magic items?

I just had a session and there was an argument about this. In the DMG page 187-188 it shows potions of healing in the magic item section. In the PHB page 153 it says they are magical. On DNDBeyond it is considered both magical and mundane when you go to add equipment to your character. One player was saying they are always magic items and another was saying that according to dndbeyond it isn’t always a magic item. Which person is correct?

If one target of a Twinned Spell has 0 HP, does the Grave cleric’s Circle of Mortality feature maximize healing on a second target who’s not at 0 HP?

One PC is a multiclassed Grave Domain cleric/sorcerer. They cast a healing spell on a PC that has 0 health, and use the Twinned Spell Metamagic option to target another PC with the same spell.

Would the second PC also have its healing from the spell maximized by the Grave cleric’s Circle of Mortality feature (XGtE, p. 20), even if the second PC is not also at 0 HP?

Is there an official explanation for the fluff of why magical healing is less effective on creatures with lots of hit points?

I’m most familiar with D&D 3.5e and 5e, which both have pretty similar ways of describing hit points. The 3.5e SRD says

Hit points mean two things in the game world: the ability to take physical punishment and keep going, and the ability to turn a serious blow into a less serious one.

5e’s Player’s Handbook has a couple bits about hit points, but the most descriptive part is on page 196.

Hit points represent a combination of physical and mental durability, the will to live, and luck.

Hit points are a reasonable abstraction by themselves, since in both the editions I know about, they effectively convey the fact that a tougher or more experienced character is better-able to survive dangerous scenarios. They also allow a novice and an epic hero to spend similar amounts of time recuperating after an adventure (since natural healing scales with the number of Hit Dice a creature has), which makes sense, given what hit points are stated to represent.

However, magical healing (be it via potions or a divine caster’s spells) scales with the caster’s abilities and not with the target’s hit points. This means that, in both editions, an average peasant or a 1st-level fighter who drinks a healing potion will instantly heal from all their injuries and be brought back to full fighting strength. However, an epic dragon-slaying adventurer (or, in a more extreme case, an actual dragon, with its mountains of hit points) would drink the same potion, and only a very small percentage of their vitality would be restored.

What’s with the difference? I know that mechanically it serves as a sink for high-level parties’ gold and spell slots to force players to use stronger magical healing, but narratively, I haven’t been able to find any information on why everybody’s natural healing happens at similar rates, but the efficacy of magical healing is inversely proportional to a target’s natural fortitude and adventuring experience. Did 1st and 2nd editions handle healing differently, or is there something specific about healing potions and magic that causes them to behave this way, or is there simply no explanation given, with the assumption being that "it’s just a mechanical thing, don’t think about it too hard"?

In 5th ed would a bard who multi-class as a life domain cleric have his bard healing spells improved? [duplicate]

I have a 9th level bard. Hypothetically, if when I reached 10th level I took a level in cleric and chose the life domain, so I would be bard 9/cleric 1.

The multi-classing rules state "When you gain a new level in a class, you get its features for that level" and then lists a bunch of exceptions, none of which apply to this situation.

In the cleric class, at level 1 you take a domain. The life domain has an ability called disciple of life which reads

Also starting at first level, your healing spells are more effective. Whenever you use a spell of 1st level or higher to restore hit points to a creature, the creature regains additional hit points equal to 2 + the spell’s level."

Note that it says healing spells, not specifically cleric ones.

It would seem the RAW here is that this would apply to my bard spells as well. So my mass cure wounds (which is 5th level and I would not be able to know as a cleric spell but which I do know as a bard spell), would heal everything an additional 7 points.

Is this how multiclassing works? It seems like my best multi-class option if it does (although I’d probably wait until 11th level since level 10 bards get awesome stuff). Am I missing something?

Optimize a druid for debuff and healing

I would like to play a druid (preferably circle of dreams).

If possible, a wood-elf would be useful, but any race that can be tall (6ft+) is acceptable.

I would be starting level two, and probably heading until level 5 or so.

Multiclass is allowed, but not prefered.

I would like to focus on healing and debuffs, and my DM will allow a small editing of spell lists, as long as it is relatively balanced.

The party are all level two, and have a divination wizard, a assassin rogue, and a fighter, who’s archetype isn’t yet confirmed but probably will be champion.

All sourcebook and UA allowed.

Point buy/standard array scores.

Feats allowed.

(Thanks in advance, and please edit if you think it needs reformatting)

How does the optional Healing Surge rule interact with other uses of hit dice?

There is an optional rule in the DMG (p. 266-267) for Healing Surges:

As an action, a character can use a healing surge and spend up to half his or her Hit Dice. For each Hit Die spent in this way, the player rolls the die and adds the character’s Constitution modifier. The character regains hit points equal to the total. The player can decide to spend an additional Hit Die after each roll.

A character who uses a healing surge can’t do so again until he or she finishes a short or long rest.

Under this optional rule, a character regains all spent Hit Dice at the end of a long rest. With a short rest, a character regains Hit Dice equal to his or her level divided by four (minimum of one die).

The rules for a Short Rest (PHB p. 186) state:

A character can spend one or more Hit Dice at the end of a short rest, up to the character’s maximum number of Hit Dice, which is equal to the character’s level.

This leads me to two questions about how these things interact:

1) If a character has spent Hit Dice on a Healing Surge, can he or she still spend additional Hit Dice at the end of a Short Rest? (I think yes.)

2) What is the order of things happening “at the end of a short rest” — does the character regain level/4 HD first, and then might re-expend those immediately, or does he expend as many as he or she wants and has left first, and then regains level/4?

How many turns does it take for an unseen servant to pass a healing potion in combat?

Unseen servant reads:

Once on each of your turns as a bonus action, you can mentally command the servant to move up to 15 feet and interact with an object. The servant can perform simple tasks that a human servant could do, such as fetching things, cleaning, mending, folding clothes, lighting fires, serving food, and pouring wine. Once you give the command, the servant performs the task to the best of its ability until it completes the task, then waits for your next command.

Assume I used my bonus action to command it to give the healing potion in my pocket to another character, and that it is within reach when I do. It would take a player one turn to complete the task. A free item interaction to draw the potion, then movement, followed by an action to safely pass it over. But the unseen servant seems to be solely capable of movement then a single item interaction.

How many turns would it take for it to perform this task? And if two or more are necessary what is the order of operations? Can it move after interacting with an object?

Optional rules for a DM to compensate for lack of healing in party?


Context

The party in my game consists of two ‘ranged damage dealers’ and two ‘tanky damage dealers’ (resp. revised ranger and warlock + paladin and fighter), but it doesn’t have a healer. I don’t want the paladin and ranger to feel ‘forced’ to pick healing spells, especially since that’s not the type of character they want to play. The party is currently level 6, and until now they weren’t on the brink of dying too often… However, as enemies are getting smarter, the damage dealers in the back will get focused on more frequently, for being the biggest threat. And I notice I’m holding back as DM quite a lot in this regard. I’m also looking for ways that players can recover from big sudden AOE explosions, during battle, which occurs more often at this tier of play.

Examples

On YouTube I see some DMs let a party pick a support NPC to tag along. This can offer interesting options for plot development, but this also feels a bit too ‘heal-botty’. So this isn’t a solution that is satisfying for my case because it takes away quite some of the strategic decision making at the table. And we all prefer challenging encounters.

In their loot I’m including more potions than I would have otherwise, as well as Spell Scrolls with healing spells. The reason why the potions are not completely satisfactory to me as a DM, is that:

  1. I have the hunch that the party suffers from a dependency on Healing Potions in how this effects their ‘action economy’, and
  2. I’m curious to alternatives for more versatility in combat.

What do the books offer for how player characters can regain Hit Points during battle, without using class features or spells?

Do the books offer other options, without relying on dedicated support characters? I do realise that support goes beyond healing, but options for healing is the focus of this question.

What is the reason to use the Heal skill assuming that other means of healing are not prohibited?

Reading the description of the Heal skill in Pathfinder and comparing its outcomes to other ways of healing, such as wands, channel positive energy etc., I have found that skill useless. The only benefit seems to be a relatively low to non-existent cost per use and unlimited amount of uses per day.

For a party of adventurers, this seems quite useless due to the amount of time spent to achieve certain results — the adventurers don’t have unlimited time. But, being new to the system, I want to hear if there is something beyond my current level of understanding.

Does the Heal skill have any real benefit over magical methods of healing?


This question has attracted many answers based on what is essentially a house rule:

  • Wealth by level being severely cut, even compared to the “low fantasy” threshold
  • The Heal skill being able to solve more problems than listed in the book
  • Access to magic items being drastically cut
  • Etc.

Such answers might be OK and might propose interesting house rules, but please, tell that your answer is based on a house rule if it is! Many of those rules turn Pathfinder in an entirely different game with a completely different balance.