Illusory Script contract fraud

I have an idea, I am playing a classic contract-type fiend warlock very much a "sign on the dotted line and you will have ____…. in exchange for your soul" and I was planning on using Illusory Script for contract fraud and want to know if it would work. For example, I write up a contract that says "I (warlock name) will give you a cup of tea, in exchange, you (victim name) will give me your soul… sign here _____" But then use an illusion to make it bog-standard fair contract. Obviously, the areas you sign are the same on both versions. Are there any obvious issues or workaround I would worry about?

Does the shield of faith spell combines with mirror image spell to provide an AC boost to the illusory duplicates created via mirror image?

Spell synergy question.

Casting order is mirror image spell first so the illusory duplicates AC are set and then adding in shield of faith spell, creating a barrier "around" the creature mirror image was cast on and if I am right around the occupied space of said creature, so this would include the illusory duplicates.

Would the "shield of faith" spell(description: A shimmering field appears and surrounds a creature of your choice within range, granting it a +2 bonus to AC for the duration.) provide an AC boost to the illusory duplicates created via the "mirror image" spell(description: Three illusory duplicates of yourself appear in your space. Until the spell ends, the duplicates move with you and mimic your actions, shifting position so it’s impossible to track which image is real. You can use your action to dismiss the illusory duplicates.) given that they are all occupying the same space and moving in sync(mimic your actions).

If this is indeed how these 2 spells sync, the illusory duplicates would instead have 15 AC each instead of 13 AC while also boosting the original creatures AC by +2.

Can the spell Illusory Script be of use as a heuristic for spell learning or mastery? [closed]


Learning Magic: The Problem

In Advanced Dungeons & Dragons (1st & 2nd editions) the rules required that all ‘magic-users’ have Read Magic as a basic requirement to do any wizarding (so-called in later editions) whatsoever.

Down through the editions this tradition was lost. Moreover, there is not a single spell that: allows a wizard to teach a student, assist fellow wizard in understanding their personal works, nor some magical process whereby a magic-scroll writer might assist a friendly caster to make use of enchanted-scribed works.

With this interpretation of Illusory Script it may be possible to solve these three lore-issues at once. Yet how much is sacrificed in the RAW & RAI for RAF & ‘rules of cools‘. The question:

Can Illusory Script be a heuristic / learning device for the training of one’s first cantrips, the learning of a friendly wizard’s spells and/or assistance on casting a friendly caster’s scroll?

Here we provide both logic for why it might work (and why it would be great role-playing if it did).


The RAW Spell: Conveys A Specific Meaning That A Caster Intends.

The spell Illusory Script gives any written work two levels or layers of use &/or meaning. The foundation-layer gains this power:

To you and any creatures you designate when you cast the spell, the writing appears normal, written in your hand, and conveys whatever meaning you intended when you wrote the text. To all others, the writing appears as if it were written in an unknown or magical script that is unintelligible. Alternatively, you can cause the writing to appear to be an entirely different Message, written in a different hand and language, though the language must be one you know.(emphasis added by writer)

What This Means: Uses For Meanings Conveyed

  • Spell books are for a purpose or meaning (i.e. ‘how to memorize/prepare spells’). After a long rest a wizard reviews their own written works, then they gain choices to apply on these freshly regained spells (or ‘slots’). Understanding and scribing new spells from another book takes considerable time & effort.

If one could gain this implied intended meaning directly from an original caster, they could learn the spell as if the book were their own. Thus, reading an alien spell book with Illusory Script (and permission-access) renders spells ready for use. Once a spell is in mind (‘memorized’ or ‘prepared’), actual scribing in one’s own book is faster, easier and cheaper (less than half the time & price).

  • Casting spells from a magic-scroll of a higher spell-slot has serious risk involved. Given the conveyed meaning listed above may give either: automatic success, advantage – or even some kind of proficiency bonus.

The underlying mechanics

A 3rd level+ person (from any class) must train up a ‘zero-level’ non-magical peasant-peon to first level ‘apprentice’ stage, i.e. able to use at least one cantrip. Clerics and Druids are inspired via various celestial, fae &/or fiendish sources, miraculously empowered for appropriate supplicants. Sorcerers are just born that way. For bards, wizards and some warlocks such easy pathways are not available. Using a cantrip-scroll written by a 3rd lvl+ bard, wizard or warlock combined with Illusory Script allows the writer-‘master’ to pass on deep magical understandings with intentional meanings – directly into the student. This heuristic allows any apprentice, no matter how thick, to gain their first cantrip… breaking otherwise impossible barriers.

The Illusion As A Heuristic: Koans & Riddles

  • Breaking Down Mental Barriers: An illusory message as a riddle that grants passage to the ‘real’ message is brilliant lore-wise. Imagine: upon a bard’s mastery of a ballad’s score the music sheets reveal Vicious Mockery; upon signing soul-binding documents with blood, the scale lifts, or; the researching apprentice would see through the illusion to find yet another illusion. This re-skinning of Illusory Script transforms this minimally used spell to a pivotal plot point.

  • Time pressure for ambitious students: After ten days this spell’s magic fades, leaving the otherwise incomprehensible scribed-spell or magic-scroll behind. Sure the knowledge &/or magic remains but the bridge of understanding is gone. Imagine the frantic apprentice bard, warlock &/or wizard on day nine just feeling the pressure of their search or study.

Exemplary Precedent: Mind-Altering Illusions

Though the illusion-spells Phantasmal Force, Dream and Weird all modify minds, only Illusory Script specifically conveys a caster’s meaning.

Author’s note: I am looking for a general understanding here. Please don’t answer with ‘I don’t understand the question’ or ‘you answered this yourself!’ or ‘moved to discussion’ or ‘let the DM decide!’ –

Bottom Line: I just want to know if (and why) this would work RAW / RAI.

Can you designate a creature you haven’t met for Illusory Script?

A military general wishes to deliver important instructions to an allied leader who is a long distance away. To safeguard the message from being read by enemy spies during delivery, the general employs the services of a wizard. The wizard is able to cast illusory script, which provides a desirable level of security.

However, the wizard has never met or seen the intended recipient, although the general has. The general can give the wizard the recipient’s name and description. Illusory script says

To you and any creature you designate when you cast the spell, the writing appears normal.

My questions are: can the wizard designate a specific creature they have not met as being able to read their illusory script? How much does the wizard need to know about a creature to be able to designate them?

For context, I am the GM. I am doing a plausibility check on this plan. In the event of ambiguity, I can make an appropriate ruling.

Would it be balanced to give a Sorcerer access to the Illusory Dragon spell?

Xanathar’s Guide to Everything features the spell Illusory Dragon.

Maybe it’s me, but doesn’t this spell description scream Sorcerer? But to my surprise, by RAW the spell is only available for Wizards.

Would it be balanced to allow this spell for Sorcerers?

Maybe I am missing some extreme synergy with a Sorcerer class feature that would make it overpowered…

Can Illusory Reality be used to make food or potions?

As the title states I am wondering about Illusory reality’s ability for self sustainment and healing capabilities. It specifies that “you can choose one inanimate, nonmagical object that is part of the illusion and make that object real.” Well at least to me there is nothing magical or animated about a ham sandwich or a glass of water or a potion of healing. It seems like many people focus on its uses for damage when they ask these kinds of questions but what about for healing or nourishment? Is it possible to create an illusion of a piece of cooked meat and make it real, then eat it to save yourself from starvation? What about healing? Can you make a potion and use it to heal yourself in an emergency?

How is repeated use of Illusory Reality limited?

I’m planning on creating an advanced Illusionist for a high level campaign. When reading through the rules for said school of wizardry, I came across this:

When you cast an illusion spell of 1st level or higher, you can choose one inanimate, nonmagical object that is part of the illusion and make that object real. You can do this on your turn as a bonus action while the spell is ongoing. The object remains real for 1 minute.

This seems ridiculously overpowered, even for a level 14+ character, given that one can combine it with the action of Minor Illusion, a cantrip, so the uses are near infinite. Is there a limit on the number of times this can be done?

For example, if a ceiling were falling, couldn’t I just cast and recast all sorts of barriers and objects to stop its descent?

Can the spells combine, or is there an unexpected consequence or something entirely different? If there isn’t, this campaign will be a breeze, which won’t be nice for a one-shot (you can’t keep treasure, so it has to be about the journey, not the reward).

What counts as “one object” for the Illusion wizard’s Illusory Reality and Malleable Illusions features?

I DM for a player who is considering creating a School of Illusion Wizard. They have correctly noted that many things about illusions in the game are open to interpretation, and have asked me to let me know how I would rule on several interactions, in the interest of managing their own expectations. The following question asks about one of these interactions, with the intent of finding out if there is a definitive answer, and gathering information about what would be a reasonable/practical ruling that others have made at their tables if there isn’t.

The 14th-level School of Illusion wizard feature, Illusory Reality, can make one object in an illusion spell real for one minute (PHB, p. 118):

When you cast an illusion spell of 1st level or higher, you can choose one inanimate, nonmagical object that is part of the illusion and make that object real. You can do this on your turn as a bonus action while the spell is ongoing. The object remains real for 1 minute. For example, you can create an illusion of a bridge over a chasm and then make it real long enough for your allies to cross.

The object can’t deal damage or otherwise directly harm anyone.

Although the intent is that you can only use this feature on one object per illusion spell, this answer suggests you can use it multiple times on the same object while the spell persists.

But what exactly does “one object” mean, in the context of the 6th-level School of Illusion wizard feature, Malleable Illusions (PHB, p.118)?

Starting at 6th level, when you cast an illusion spell that has a duration of 1 minute or longer, you can use your action to change the nature of that illusion (using the spell’s normal parameters for the illusion), provided that you can see the illusion.

With Malleable Illusions, you can change an object in an illusion into another object, into a creature, or into something else (like graffiti on a wall).

This answer suggests that if you did so to an object made real with Illusory Reality, the changed object would remain real.

So: it seems like you might be able to make your “one object” real multiple times, while using Malleable Illusions to change it to a different object each time (if you can’t alter objects made real with Illusory Reality using Malleable Illusions, just wait until they are illusions again before using MI).

Is this actually possible?

(Obviously you would still only ever be able to have one real object per illusion spell at any particular time.)

As an example, consider this sequence of events:

  1. Create an illusory sword (with a spell such as Major Image)
  2. Make the sword real with Illusory Reality
  3. Wait a minute for the sword to become illusory again (whether you can apply Malleable Illusions to an object made real by Illusory Reality, and thus skip this step, is the subject of this question)
  4. Alter the nature of the illusory sword to be an illusory lump of coal instead
  5. Try to apply Illusory Reality to make the coal real. Can this be done?

Abuse of Illusory Reality

I’d like to know some methods of curtailing the abuse of the Illusionist power “Illusory Reality” in a game. Right now I have a player here running roughshod over the other GMs in the group by using it to pull off some highly destructive and, imho, questionable tactics. Things like, making part of a castle floor seem to disappear, then making it real, dropping half a dozen soldiers to the next floor down; cue falling damage. He’s even gone so far as to have objects crush high level victims upon the object’s return from the illusory state.

He generally has some impressive logic to back him up, but I get the feeling, watching him work that he’s generally violating both RAW and RUI on a regular basis. He, admittedly, hasn’t done this to me yet, but I run 3.5E and Pathfinder normally, which has it’s own potential for rule abuse.