Are there any creatures that are immune to critical hits?

My thinking behind this is to do with the property of Adamantine Armour which states that "While you’re wearing it, any critical hit against you becomes a normal hit" (DMG, p.150).

I wondered if there are any creatures in the officially published materials that have this feature "naturally"? – possibly as a result of their skin/scales being so hard or because of another innate feature.

I am looking for answers with reference to creatures from 5e or previous editions.

As a Werewolf who is immune to non-magic physical damage, can Swarm of Rot Grubs get past my skin

I’m a part of a homebrew setting 5e game where the real homebrew, outside of lore, is only custom monsters that are rarely made by the DM as he prefers to use normal dnd monsters when he can. In this latest game, he used Swarms of Rot Grubs and one managed to hit me and a turn later dig in.

However, I questioned how the Grubs got through my skin in the first place as normal swords and spears failed to pierce my hide in the past.

DM ruled it as they do, so I will accept it as such….also helps we’re fairly mid-game, so we have someone with lesser restoration.

But I want to know how the internet thinks about this, since the Grubs have no way of hurting me, can they still somehow bypass that Immunity to feast on my heart?

DM allows content up to Tasha’s. From what I understand it’s the basic version of DnD 5e. Apologies if that doesn’t clarify things better.

Are oozes immune to critical failures?

In a previous session, one of my players used Sudden Bolt against a Living Sap. Living Sap’s have immunity to critical hits. They rolled low on their Reflex Save, and got 11 less than the spellcaster’s DC. I ruled critical failure and gave Sudden Bolt double damage. One of my players had assumed that their immunity to critical hits would make them immune to critical failures (they didn’t fight too hard since it was a fairly beneficial ruling 🙂 ). Was I right to rule that way? (I’ve included my reasoning as an answer on the off chance that I’m right).

Is a Wild Shaped druid effectively immune to the Detect Thoughts spell?

For standard usage of the Detect Thoughts spell,

"If the creature you choose has an Intelligence of 3 or lower or doesn’t speak any language, the creature is unaffected" (PHB, pg 231).

Additionally one may use the Detect Thoughts spell to detect the presence of creatures they can’t see, however

"You can’t detect a creature with an Intelligence of 3 or lower or one that doesn’t speak any language" (231).

The description for Wild Shape states,

"your ability to speak or take any action that requires hands is limited to the capabilities of your beast form" (67).

Apart from the crow, no non-awakened beast has the ability to speak (the crow specifically has the Mimicry abilty and notably has no languages listed on its stat block).

So it begs the question, can a Wild Shaped druid be affected by the Detect Thoughts spell?

Going one step further, would a druid with the ability to speak telepathically while Wild Shaped be affected any differently by the spell?

Related questions:

  • Does the Detect Thoughts spell work against an Intellect Devourer?
  • In what ways can a druid’s Wild Shape be detected?
  • Can a druid speak while in wild-shape?
  • Can I Wild Shape or Polymorph into an Awakened Beast?

This question was inspired by the Telepathic feat from Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything.

Can you apply Hex damage when the target is immune to the initial damage?

The Warlock is fighting a Ochre Jelly. On his turn, he cast Hex on the Jelly as a bonus action, then hits it with his Short sword. The Ochre Jelly is immune to the slashing damage, so the attack does zero damage regardless of what the Warlock rolls, however is the Hex able to proc, and deal 1d6 necrotic damage to the jelly?

Hex states (PHB p.251):

You place a curse on a creature that you can see within range. Until the spell ends, you deal an extra 1d6 necrotic damage to the target whenever you hit it with an attack. […]

So although the attack hit, would the Jelly still take the Hex’s additional damage when it is immune to the original damage of the attack?

Is there a way to become immune to Possession all the time?

I’m going to be running an Eberron game soon, and one of the players has expressed an interest in playing one of the Inspired ‘gone rogue’. Unfortunately, the rules for Possession of the Inspired are … Very much in favor of the Quori.

I can always come up with a custom item, but is there a way to become immune to possession more or less all the time in 3.5? Answers that work from moderate levels are preferred, but anything that works will give me something to work with.

I am looking for pre-existing solutions which are rules legal as a starting point.

Can the Nystul’s Magic Aura spell make you immune to/unable to be targeted by the Dominate Person spell?

Nystul’s Magic Aura can make it so that magic and spells treat a creature as though it were another creature type. However the extent of this effect is ambiguous.

At first, it says the following, which specifically mentions spells which “detect creature types”. One could argue that this means it only affects information gathering spells.

You change the way the target appears to spells and magical effects that detect creature types, such as a paladin’s Divine Sense or the trigger of a symbol spell.

Then it goes on to give a far more general rule:

You choose a creature type and other spells and magical effects treat the target as if it were a creature of that type or of that alignment.

One could use this to change one’s effective creature type to something like Dragon or Celestial. This would seem to make you immune to spells that require a humanoid target, such as Dominate Person, as well as magical monster abilities which require a humanoid target, such as the Vampire’s Charm ability.

One could argue that Nystul’s Magic Aura is intended to only fool spells which gather information, but one could also argue that any spell which only works on a specific creature type is one which gathers information, even if that is not its primary purpose.

Which is right? Would Nystul’s Magic Aura make you immune to Dominate Person?

Does immunity to piercing damage make you immune to the pull effect of the spell Thorn Whip?

If a character has gained immunity to all piercing damage, would that character also be immune to the pull effect of Thorn Whip?

For reference:

Thorn Whip
Transmutation cantrip

Casting Time: 1 action
Range: 30 feet
Components: V, S, M (the stem of a plant with thorns)
Duration: Instantaneous

You create a long, vine-like whip covered in thorns that lashes out at your command toward a creature in range. Make a melee spell attack against the target. If the attack hits, the creature takes 1d6 piercing damage, and if the creature is Large or smaller, you pull the creature up to 10 feet closer to you. This spell’s damage increases by 1d6 when you reach 5th level (2d6), 11th level (3d6), and 17th level (4d6).

Are creatures that are immune to disease affected by the harm spell?

The harm spell, flavourfully, states it creates a virulent disease

You unleash a virulent disease on a creature that you can see within range.

It later calls out that

Any effect that removes a disease allows a creature’s hit point maximum to return to normal before that time passes.

But no where does it state that being immune to disease (via the Paladin’s Divine Health class feature or otherwise) prevents either the initial damage or the reduction in maximum hit points.

This is in contrast to spells that spell out if immunity works, e.g. sleep.

Does immunity to disease protect you from the harm spell?