How does the Extra Attack class feature impact Two-Weapon Fighting?

A level 11 Fighter makes 3 attacks per Attack action as per:

Extra Attack

Beginning at 11th level, you can attack three times, instead of twice, whenever you take the Attack action on your turn.

According to Players’ Handbook, any character can attack with both hands:

Two-Weapon Fighting

When you take the Attack action and attack with a light melee weapon that you’re holding in one hand, you can use a bonus action to attack with a different light melee weapon that you’re holding in the other hand. You don’t add your ability modifier to the damage of the bonus attack, unless that modifier is negative.

If a level 11 Fighter is brandishing a light weapon in each hand, how many attacks do they make per turn?

4: 3 from the Attack action + 1 from the bonus action?

Or 6: 3 from the Attack action + 3 from the Bonus action?

Can the half-dragon template have a negative impact on fly speed?

First example: A half-dragon astral deva. Astral devas normally have wings, but they’re Medium, and the Half-Dragon template states that Medium half-dragons don’t have wings. Does the Astral deva lose its wings due to the template?

Second example: A half-dragon solar. Solars have a land speed of 50 ft., and a fly speed of 150 ft. The Half-Dragon template states that a creature of this size can fly at twice its base land speed, with a maximum of 120 ft. Does the solar have its fly speed reduced to double its land speed (100 ft.), or to the Half-Dragon template’s maximum fly speed (120 ft.), or does it keep its base fly speed (150 ft.)? Similarly, what (if anything) happens to its maneuverability?

Third example, based on the maneuverability part of the previous point: a half-dragon great wyrm (or any creature with a fly speed greater than 120 ft. but worse than the average maneuverability given by the Half-Dragon template). Does it keep the best aspects of its flight sources, or the worst aspects, or does it take one source for its wings in its entirety?

Melf’s Minute Meteor Impact Radius

The Melf’s Minute Meteor spell states:

" Once a meteor reaches its destination or impacts against a solid surface, the meteor explodes. Each creature within 5 feet of the point where the meteor explodes must make a Dexterity saving throw"

This seems like a fairly easy ruling for when choosing a point, choose a point in between four squares and any creature in those four squares need to make a saving throw like so:

Melf Minute Meteor Point Impact Diagram

However, how does this interact if if impacts a singular creature in the middle of a square? Does only that creature make it because only that creature is fully within 5 feet or do the creatures in the 8 surrounding squares also need to make it (reference pics below)?

Melf Minute Meteor Square Smaller Impact Diagram Melf Minute Meteor Square Larger Impact Diagram

Certificate Signed Using Weak Hashing Algorithm impact on a workstation

I did a vulnerability scan on some of our company workstations. These are workstations used by employees (dev, HR, accounting, etc.) to do their job. One of the common result I found is SSL/TLS Certificate Signed Using Weak Hashing Algorithm. Based on the vulnerability description "An attacker can exploit this to generate another certificate with the same digital signature, allowing an attacker to masquerade as the affected service." I’m thinking this is more on a server side.

My question is, what could be the impact of this in an ordinary workstation?
What can an attacker/pentester do to the workstation with this vulnerability?

What is the impact of banishment on CR?

Disclaimer: I know that monster balance is never exact and I don’t expect it to be, I’m looking for rough guidelines like they are given in the DMG for many traits.


I like to flavor up my monsters with spells. One spell that seems particularly interesting is banishment.

Monsters with that spell appear in the MM, e.g. the Death Knight, Sphinxes, and Guardian Naga. It is not clear however what effect the spell had on their CR.

I came up with the following assumptions:

  • It seems that since that since banishment is 4th level, i.e. for level 7 players, it should not appear below level 7 encounters.

  • Further, the spell requires concentration, but it seems reasonable to assume that a boss monster (no banishment for random critters) can hold concentration for some time through good saves, defense from minions, and, potentially, legendary resistance.

  • The effect of a missing PC is relevant for offense and defense since the party’s damage output is reduced and the remaining PCs get more damage (relatively).

  • a priori it does not seem that banishment will get much better or worse on higher levels, since both the concentration maintaining capacity and the effect of a missing person seem to scale with level.

Are these assumptions valid? And how can these (and other factors that I might have missed) translate into CR?

How to give the players more felt impact on the “Battle of the Silkwiesen”?

Today I started playing "The Year of the griffon" with my DSA (TDE on German) group (after about 4 or 5 sessions to teach rules, make characters, learn a bit about the pre-orc-invasion Griffon March). I use the DSA 4 re-release of the old DSA 3 adventure and the 4.1 rules, but that does not change it significantly. While the players did like the epic part of the tale, the chance to be able to take part in the biggest battle since the first demon battle1, they did correctly note that the tale dragged on:

They had little chance to do anything impactful for most of the battle, and true, they are just 5 soldiers in a body of ca. 15000 soldiers. Yet, in the 15-page long chapter dedicated to the battle, they were supposed to act inside of the constraints of a conscripted milita unit.

Even as they helped at saving Prince Brin by blasting a bunch of Orcs with flash spells (Blitz dich Find in German), making the retreat of him probably much easier, even as they were part of the final strike against the shaman raising the dead of the battle as undead, they felt like being pushed over the battlefield by forces beyond them (their commanders as proxies, the surpreme fieldmarshall Helme Haffax in person and thus (by proxy) Prince Brin himself), and true, they were.

They had large eyes about the ‘life is cheap’ attitude of the battle as I descriebed how some of their buddies died right next to them, even if I didn’t drag out the training too much (there are 2 pages dedicated to how to narrate out the training in detail and who each of those people were) but glossed over quite some of it. Mostly I was giving small ‘flashbacks’ on the training that were previously not mentioned as they saw the soldiers die – which turned out to be just as impactful as playing a whole evening to make them like the expendable NPCs.

In the end, after achieving all the optional plot goals and reducing the casulties quite some by the right choices at the right times, they cried out (with good reason) that for very very large parts it became rather boring to listen to the constant rush of high battle.

When they HAD good chance to act, then they discussed over each other what to do at all, trying to gaugue what might even have an impact and what was expected from them by the author while I clearly told them "This book has a solution for almost anything you come up with, and no, you very most likely won’t die in the prologue". I did tell them after the adventure part they had total plot armor in that battle alone, and they facepalmed: One mentioned "I could have been more reckless?!" – I did however reward that they had not been reckless.

All in all, the 15 pages translated to about 5-hourincluding interrupts, player actions and one rolled out skirmishof gaming… and gave me a rather dull feeling about playing this battle ever again, possibly using the shorcut of just summarizing the battle and its results (yes, that IS an option given!) if I ever do it again. But I did at least want to try.

Annotations

1 – The Ogre battle of 1003 BF would qualify for the biggest battle of their lifetime before the Silkwiesen. They don’t know about that battle as players. They DO know though about the Battle in front of Gareth – the first Demon Battle – that happened 1556 years ago right next to the Silkwiesen.

While page-long narratives are not uncommon to TDE and several pages of mainly narrative battle happen (ca 5 pages of interrupted narrative in the Ogre battle), The Battle on the Silkwiesen in The Year of the Griffon is probably the worst offender after the Year of the Fire, which does somewhat interrupt its massive battle with playercentric action. These battle-narratives are an exception in the bulk though: of about 200 adventures/campaigns only maybe 10 do have these large scale battles.

All in all the book is – including all handouts, index and pictures – 185 pages long. The Battle on the Silkwiesen does contain maybe 6 pages of condensed narrative with almost no player freedon if all GM info are struck. Abbreviation takes… the lines below

Battle on the Silkwiesen & Year of the Griffon abbreviated

The "Battle on the Silkwiesen" is the prologue/intro to the adventure campaign "The Year of the Griffon". It’s basically a single scripted scene with some player interaction with the surroundings. About 10000-15000 orcs clash against the same amount of mass recruits, militia, and every trained soldier the empire has available, some quarter to half of them veterans, professionals, and noble knights. In the end, 3000 soldiers and the same amount of orcs lie dead, another 3000 soldiers are wounded severely, but the orc army is in disarray and retreats back. A Pyrrhic victory, as neither side can muster enough reserves to make a strike for the following weeks…

Question

Are there situations in the battle on the Silkwiesen where players could be given more playground, even as it is a scripted 15 pages piece of narrative?