Can True Strike give me specific information about my target’s defenses? [duplicate]

The True Strike cantrip provides:

You point a finger at a target in range. Your magic grants you a brief insight into the target’s defenses. On your next turn, you gain advantage on your first attack roll against the target, provided that this spell hasn’t ended.

There’s another thread on this site discussing the cases in which casting this spell might make sense. Implicit in these arguments seems to be the idea that the "brief insight" granted by the spell is not useful in itself. It occurred to me that such insight could be useful in itself if it granted knowledge of specific details that might be useful for higher-order tactical or strategic planning outside of just getting Advantage on the next turn.

Does the brief insight granted by True Strike provide access to specific details about the target’s defenses, or is the language simply an explanation of how the player gains Advantage? An example could be where I don’t particularly need to gain Advantage on my next roll, but I want to know whether that bandit over there is concealing any weapons or wands underneath his cloak.

If the first case is true, a DM might report,

Ok, you cast True Strike at the cloaked bandit. He has knives hidden in each of his boots, and is carrying two wands of Fireball and one of Magic Missile in the sack over his shoulder. The walking stick he is carrying conceals a three-foot double-edged sword. He is resistant to lightning damage though a spell that seems to have been cast on him, but you would need a more powerful spell than True Strike to identify the exact spell or source. If you still have concentration at the start of your next turn, you will have Advantage in attacking.

Collecting consumer contact information to alert individuals in case of data breach for B2B companies

If you are a B2B company [US], you may collect data on your clients as well as your clients’ customers. For example, let’s say the only thing you need to collect is your clients’ customers’ names.

In the case that your company has a data leak and the individuals’ names are shared with an unauthorized third party, (I believe) you have an obligation to inform someone.

What is the standard practice? Do you directly email the individual and say their information was leaked? Or do you give your client (a business) a list of the client’s whose data was impacted and let them reach out to the impacted clients.

In the case of emailing the impacted clients directly, what if you do not collect their contact information, and have no way to contact them?


Real world example: my personal data was leaked by a B2B software company that I had never heard of. I was contacted by the software company directly as well as their client who I had used the services of. Was it the responsibility of the B2B software company to collect my email in case they needed to contact me directly?

The Ins And Outs Of Database Marketing For more information visit buy phone database

One of the strategies that has gotten well known with organizations searching for new customers is the strategy of information base advertising. Organizations purchase buy phone database information bases of either email locations or contact numbers from organizations who gathered this information with the aim of selling at a later stage. For more information visit buy phone database We will investigate the intricate details of really getting the information bases and how information base advertising functions. The principal thing that happens is the gathering of information from clueless individuals. This happens when you tick one of those little boxes that show up on endless structures. They regularly state something like “Would you be keen on being told about new turns of events and items like this one?” Those of us that carelessly tick yes wind up added to an information base of expected customers.For more information visit buy phone database

My players have a habit of always torturing enemies they capture for information, how can I make our adventure less macabre?

So I’m running the lost mines of Phandelver as a new DM and we’re about 5 sessions in. I’ve noticed a pattern that seems to repeat itself: the players defeat and capture an evil NPC character that knows some information, that character is tied up and intimidated/tortured, then that character inevitably spills the information it knows.

This cycle is getting a bit repetitive and depressing. How can I, as a DM, encourage my players to try more diverse ways of obtaining information from uncooperative NPCs without withholding story-critical information?

Information exposure through query strings in url of a POST request [duplicate]

I can’t seem to find any information online for when there is information exposure through query strings in URL of a POST request.

I understand it is an issue for when it’s sent in HTTP GET. Wondering if it would still be an issue for when it’s sent in POST?

e.g.

POST /api/view?username=USER 

Best way to store information about a list of materials and their quantity

I want to store some information about a game. Specifically information about certain buildings that can be built in it.

Said buildings require materials to be built. I am trying to come up with a good DB model for storing that information in my database.

For example, one building needs 10 wood to be built. I thought about having a "Buildings" table with columns for ID, name, icon and material cost. However I’m usually used to referencing common values from another table. This is to say I would have a separate table named "Materials" with columns ID, name and icon and the "Buildings" table would have a column "MaterialsRequired" which would hold a reference to the ID of the needed material in the "Materials" table. But I have no idea how to do that (which is a best practice, afaik) AND store the needed amount of said material.

Can message length be useful information?

Suppose a packet is encrypted and sent via an insecure channel so that it is intercepted by a malicious third party as well as the intended recipient. As long as a suitable encryption scheme is used, the message should be (practically) uncrackable.

However, assuming that encryption preserves message length to a certain degree, the third party will gain some info about the size of the message. Is there any context in which knowing only a message’s length could be useful to a hacker? If so, what are some examples?

Web server – display TLS Handshake information

I’ve got an apache server. Currently, I have installed tshark on my server to capture the Client Hello packets and i’m able to capture tls handshake packets. I want to display the Client Hello & Server Hello packets along with the request http headers to the users visiting my webserver. I’m not able to find a way to display the TLS handshake information to the client.

An example of what I am trying to achieve can be seen here but I don’t know how they managed to display those informations.

Any help would be much appreciated.

Legal for providers to use navigation information for profiling / advertising?

My internet provider knows which sites I am connecting to (even if only the server names, when using https). Can they legally use that information for profiling / advertising? For instance, if they see me visiting www.babynames.com they might decide to send me ads for strollers and diapers.

What is the legal status of this form of profiling in the major western countries (US / EU)?