How much health will a Life Domain cleric regain from the Blessed Healer feature using the Mass Healing Word spell?

This question could loosely be considered a follow up to “Can Goodberries heal a Life cleric when consumed by another.”

How much life would a level 6 Life Cleric with four party members gain from the Blessed Healer class attribute with a casting of Mass Healing Word?

Blessed Healer

Beginning at 6th level, the healing spells you cast on others heal you as well. When you cast a spell of 1st level or higher that restores hit points to a creature other than you, you regain hit points equal to 2 + the spell’s level.

Mass Healing Word

As you call out words of restoration, up to six creatures of your choice that you can see within range regain hit points equal to 1d4 + your spellcasting ability modifier. This spell has no effect on undead or constructs.

If the Cleric casts Mass Healing Word, targeting each of the 4 party members, how many times would the Cleric gain HP equal to 2 + Spell Level?

Taken further, would the Blessed Healer effect be prevented if the Cleric targeted himself with Mass Healing Word, in addition to the other 4 members of his party?

Could a necromancer command an undead to act as it did in life?

It’s already mentioned in the 5e monster manual that skeletons uncontrolled will do things they would often do in life.

Independent skeletons temporarily or permanently free of a master’s control sometimes pantomime actions from their past lives, their bones echoing the rote behaviors of their former living selves.

Would a necromancer be able to, more or less, tap into that and perhaps make a skeleton that acts in the way it would have normally in life? And is the same true for other undead?

I know it’d be difficult for the undead in question, as they may not know how they acted in life, but if the way they acted was disclosed to them, could they act in that way? And supposing that the necromancer dies, would they continue to act in such a way with the original order?

Can the pocket dimension created by the mirror of life trapping be returned to by using the Gate spelll?

A wizard needs a few decades to think over a problem, and decides to do so in his mirror of life trapping to prevent himself from aging. He packs a bag full of writing supplies and a 5000gp diamond, and has a servant activate the mirror to trap the wizard inside. After a few years have past, the wizard realizes he misses his liquor cabinet, and casts Gate to return to his study. After grabbing a couple bottles and regaining his 9th level spell slot (he took too long and the gate had run its duration), he wishes to return to the mirror. Can the wizard recast gate and step back into the mirror, or must he return to the mirror by his servant reactivating the mirror? Does the extra dimensional cell remain in existence when the wizard leaves it, or collapse until the cell is refilled? What if the wizard leaves his notes, are they ejected when the wizard leaves?

If applicable, what other pocket dimension can or cannot be returned too in this way?

Can the Mirror of Life Trapping force multiple saves?

The Mirror of Life Trapping can trap creatures in it.

Any creature other than you that sees its reflection in the activated mirror while within 30 feet of it must succeed on a DC 15 Charisma saving throw or be trapped, along with anything it is wearing or carrying, in one of the mirror’s twelve extradimensional cells.

Does it force multiple saves? If someone stares at the mirror a remains there looking at themselves for 5 minutes, do they have to save more than once? Or only every time they blink?

What if they look away and look back on the mirror?

Are creatures aware of the effect of Mirror of Life Trapping?

The Mirror of Life Trapping can trap creatures in it.

Any creature other than you that sees its reflection in the activated mirror while within 30 feet of it must succeed on a DC 15 Charisma saving throw or be trapped, along with anything it is wearing or carrying, in one of the mirror’s twelve extradimensional cells.

Does the creature even know it’s making a save for something? If it doesn’t, then it’s likely my players will stand around for a while and I’ll call for multiple saves. Otherwise, they’ll probably look away very quickly.

Breath of Life and cure spells

Clerics have the ability to spontaneously cast a cure spell if they have a spell slot of the same level to trade out for it. Does this mechanic apply to breath of life? Normally I would think not however the way the spell reads is very similar to that of the other cure spells and it even heals 1d8 more than the previous cure spell to keep the leveling trend going. "This spell cures 5d8 points of damage + 1 point per caster level (maximum +25)." emphasis on "cures".

Can a sword of life stealing steal more hp than the target has?

The entry for Sword of Life Stealing says: "When you attack a creature with this magic weapon and roll a 20 on the attack roll, that target takes an extra 10 necrotic damage if it isn’t a construct or an undead. You also gain 10 temporary hit points.

Note: According to the SRD, it is an extra 3d6 necrotic damage."

However, my DM says that a Sword of Life Stealing inflicts its damage in a certain order on a natural 20: first the regular damage, then crit damage, THEN the necrotic damage…so if by that point the target has no more hp left to lose, I receive no temporary hp. Basically he said that the target "has no more life to steal".

I thought this was a bit of a strange interpretation. Is there an official ruling somewhere?

Course teaching time complexities in real life systems

Having mis-read What course in CS deals with the study of RAM, CPU, Storage? I now wonder what course in CS deals with time complexities including GPUs, CPU caches in multiple levels, seek times on hard disk vs. SSDs, and bandwidth to disk and RAM.

I was taught the big O-notation but it never took into account that I might have a GPU with 100s of cores, or a limited amount of extremely fast cache, or a harddisk that is has a high bandwidth, but a high seek time.

Which class teaches this extended version of algorithm time complexities, which takes real world limitations into account?

In 5th ed would a bard who multi-class as a life domain cleric have his bard healing spells improved? [duplicate]

I have a 9th level bard. Hypothetically, if when I reached 10th level I took a level in cleric and chose the life domain, so I would be bard 9/cleric 1.

The multi-classing rules state "When you gain a new level in a class, you get its features for that level" and then lists a bunch of exceptions, none of which apply to this situation.

In the cleric class, at level 1 you take a domain. The life domain has an ability called disciple of life which reads

Also starting at first level, your healing spells are more effective. Whenever you use a spell of 1st level or higher to restore hit points to a creature, the creature regains additional hit points equal to 2 + the spell’s level."

Note that it says healing spells, not specifically cleric ones.

It would seem the RAW here is that this would apply to my bard spells as well. So my mass cure wounds (which is 5th level and I would not be able to know as a cleric spell but which I do know as a bard spell), would heal everything an additional 7 points.

Is this how multiclassing works? It seems like my best multi-class option if it does (although I’d probably wait until 11th level since level 10 bards get awesome stuff). Am I missing something?