Fully disable a single ACPI event in Linux

Hello I currently work with a HP notebook, an HP Spectre x360 – 13-4203NG (ENERGY STAR) to be specific.

The thing works great with linux (I currently use Ubuntu 19.04 with GNOME, but i also had that problem with other and older distros over the last 3 years) with one minor remark: After booting the airplane mode toggles for a while (up to 20seconds) until it finally stays off. I think it’s originated from ACPI events that are fired and interpreted to dis- and re-enable the network. I’m facing a similiar issue when I flip the convertible, as the airplane mode is always enabled the moment i switch from tablet-mode to normal mode.

My question: is there an option to disalbe the ACPI event button/wlan? To prevent the routine from toggling/ switching on the airplane mode?

acpi_listen # Notebook mode -> Flipping the convertible. video/tabletmode TBLT 0000008A 00000001 # Flipping the convertible back. video/tabletmode TBLT 0000008A 00000000 # button/wlan events are fired. WHY? button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K 

Right afert booting the same event occurs, always in groups of 3 with maybe 1-2 seconds delay in between.

acpi_listen # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K # group. button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K button/wlan WLAN 00000080 00000000 K 

I have disabled the HP Wireless hotkeys on driver level, but even when the button is disabled the events are fired and the exact same behaviour occurs.

Any help would be appreciated

Best regards Florian

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