Is Fungitek mentioned in the official Shadowrun lore?

I was recently reading about the Ork/Seattle Underground and came across an article about the location on Shadowrun’s "Fandom" Wiki. In the article a company called "Fungitek" was mentioned, which sparked my interest for reasons unrelated to this question, and as such I tried searching for it online, and also looked for any mentions of it in the Shadowrun 5th Edition Core Rulebook but couldn’t find any mentions of it. As for my search online all I could find were some German wiki pages about it, which leads me to my question: Is Fungitek mentioned in the official Shadowrun lore, and if so, where?

What is the relationship between demons and aberrations in Forgotten Realms lore?

The relationship between devils and demons is well understood through the lore of the Blood War. Is there a similar relationship between demons and aberrations from the Far Realm? Is there a relationship in Forgotten Realms canon that would serve as a backdrop or scaffolding to support interaction between the two groups in a campaign (e.g Descent into Avernus)?

Are there any examples in D&D lore (all editions) of metallic or chromatic dragons switching alignment?

In a previous question I asked about a dragon antagonist I am planning. I originally intended this to be a chromatic dragon because I believed they are always evil, but an answer to that question got me thinking.

In the Monster Manual it states that all chromatic dragons are driven by greed and selfishness and are feared by all people.

Likewise, all metallic dragons are good.

However, are there any examples in the lore of either of these being switched? I imagine it would be more likely that a metallic dragon becomes evil than a chromatic dragon becomes good, but are there any outliers at all?

I am willing to accept any examples from any of the editions of D&D or the broader fiction written around the setting.

In a mechanics and lore perspective is this reasonable customized dragon mechanics [duplicate]

I am working on the first main antagonist for my campaign a DnD 5th edition

This will be a green or blue dragon who has the ability to shape change into a human and is a magic user.

The dragon will be attempting to gather magical knowledge, spell books, arcane items etc therefore gathering strength and becoming harder for the party to combat as the campaign progresses. Initially appearing as an ally.

My question is that I know there is an arcane dragon archetype in the monster manual but these dragons seem to have inherent magic much like a sorceror as opposed to learnt. I am looking for my dragon to have some inherent magical ability strengthened by utilizing spells more like a wizard, having an ever growing list of available spells that grows as it gains more knowledge but needing to prepare a set amount each day based on its development.

In terms of either Current or historic DnD lore and mechanics are there examples of dragons learning spells in this way, gathering a magical Arsenal in the same way as a wizard would and growing in terms of magical ability over time by learning new knowledge? Am happy if the lore or mechanics ideas come from older editions of DnD that I can tweak to fit in with 5th edition.

I am specifically looking to see if there is any precedent I can work from to try and make this more balanced as the campaign progresses.

In Forgotten Realms lore, can gods use spells above 9th level?

After Karsus’s folly, Mystra imposed a ban on use of magic above 9th level (I believe there are specific conditions for 10th level spells, but that’s not the main issue here). However, I believe the specific mentions of Mystra’s Ban have unclear wording:

In the aftermath of Netheril’s fall, however, Mystra banned certain high-level spells that she deemed too powerful for mortals to wield responsibly. Thus, current-day spellcasters no longer have access to true spells of 10th level and higher. Instead, access to epic magic comes via two feats—Improved Spellcasting Capacity and Epic Spellcasting—that function in very different ways.

(p43, Lost Empires of Faerun)

When Mystryl reincarnated herself—this time as Mystra—she used the form of a beautiful peasant girl learning the basics of cantra magic but with the capacities for archwizardry. Her first priority was to recreate the weave of magic. This time, she made magic follow a few more rules, and no spell above 10th level would function.

(p12, Netheril: Empire of Magic)

The second text seems to imply that the weave doesn’t allow for spells above 10th level. Which means that the gods, if they use the weave, couldn’t either. The first one, however, says that this ban is due to mortals not being responsible enough to use those spells. So perhaps the gods, who haven’t shown such irresponsibility, can use them?

I fear that other source material isn’t particularly optimistic. The Deities & Demigods book for 3e doesn’t mention the use of spells above 9th level.

How have the Shadar-kai changed over the editions and is there any consistency to be found in the lore between editions?

In D&D 5e, the Shadar-kai are a sub-race of elves. However, it seems that in 4e, the Shadar-kai were humans. In both cases, they lived in the Shadowfell and served the Raven Queen, so it doesn’t seem likely that they are two separate peoples; rather, they are supposed to be the same "race", despite being human in one edition and elven in the next.

I believe they were also in editions prior to 4e, but I’m only going by the Forgotten Realms wiki page, which seems to claim that they were a kind of neutral evil fey creature in 3.Xe (but generally the information on that page appears to be a mish-mash of conflicting lore from various editions, which is kinda the point of this question).

This is confusing to me; I’m not sure if it’s possible to extract any consistency out of this, but if it is possible, I want to ask:

  • For each edition of D&D that the Shadar-kai appeared in, what were they? Human? Elf? Something else?
  • I’d also be curious to know, briefly, what they were like, since in 4e/5e they live in the Shadowfell and serve the Raven Queen, but in previous editions the Shadowfell/Raven Queen didn’t exist, so what were they all about instead? Again, only very briefly, since this isn’t the main point of this question.
  • For each of these editions, is there any official lore justification for why the race changes? Or is it more like the previous lore was just disregarded and overwritten (such as in the case of 4e -> 5e, where 5e just seems to forget that they were ever human in 4e)? Again, I’m looking for in-universe lore, not designer-reasons.

Since the Forgotten Realms wiki has confused me, I would prefer people to cite from official source book and Dragon magazines and similar, rather than wiki websites like that one.

Examples from pathfinder lore of the process of destroying an artifact

So I was reading the description of mages disjunction trying to look for a way to make mechanics for rulebreaker from FSN and noticed it said that mages disjunction has a 1% chance per CL to destroy an artifact and that doing so may draw the attention of a "powerful being".

I want to know about examples from pathfinder lore that describe what that powerful being would be and what that "attention" would look like.

You can also use this spell to target a single item. The item gets a Will save at a -5 penalty to avoid being permanently destroyed. Even artifacts are subject to mage’s disjunction, though there is only a 1% chance per caster level of actually affecting such powerful items. If successful, the artifact’s power unravels, and it is destroyed (with no save). If an artifact is destroyed, you must make a DC 25 Will save or permanently lose all spellcasting abilities. These abilities cannot be recovered by mortal magic, not even miracle or wish. Destroying artifacts is a dangerous business, and it is 95% likely to attract the attention of some powerful being who has an interest in or connection with the device.

Obviously I’m going to lend more of an ear to the SRD than some random Redditor but it makes me curious about how exac

What archfey exist in Eberron lore that would make a suitable warlock patron?

I’m planning on making an Archfey warlock for an upcoming Eberron game. To flesh out my character’s backstory, I want to know more about what kind of "fey" entities such a warlock might form a pact with.

For context, the character’s backstory is that they are a Valenar elf who’s ancestor that he has to emulate was an "Eldritch Knight" or similar, some kind of battlemage anyway, except that my character isn’t very strong or smart (STR and INT are his dump stats), so he instead formed a pact with an archfey being to make up the difference, becoming a Pact of the Blade warlock so that he could better emulate his ancestor.

The reason I’ve picked the Archfey archetype is because the Valenar seems to be rather connected with fey, at least considering the various "Valenar xxx" animals listed in Eberron: Rising from the Last War.

I can of course work with my DM to just "invent" an archfey if need be, but I wanted first to see if there are any existing named archfey within any Eberron lore (from any edition of D&D if 5e doesn’t have anything), and bonus points if that archfey is associated with the Valenar elves at all.

What is the lore behind why soul coins have the symbol of Bhaal on them?

I am struggling to find an image of both sides of a Soul Coin (Baator’s currency), but everywhere I’ve looked, I’ve only found only one side bearing a letter and the other side depicting a skull with blood droplets flying around it.

But it is the symbol of Bhaal. Why does it appear on Baator’s currency?

Am I correct about how soul coins look? What images appear on the sides of a soul coin, and why?

Are lore rolls to detect magic automatic?

I know from reading the volume 1 rule book, that the presence of magic such as with trap-wards and ghosts (examples used as they are cited in the book), can be detected by a magic user rolling well on lore – however, I’m not sure on if the roll is supposed to be automatic or not? According to the rules of the system.

As in, if there is something like a magical trap set or a non-visible ghost present: by the rules, is the GM be supposed to automatically call for magic-users to roll lore to detect magic, or do the players have to decide themselves if they want to make a roll to check an area?

I’ve perhaps missed something somewhere in the book clarifying this.