Does a magic item giving +3 to spell save DC break bounded accuracy?

In Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything p.134, there is a magic item: Rhythm Maker’s Drum. It gives bonus to spell attack rolls and spell saving throw DCs of the user depending on rarity: uncommon +1, rare +2, very rare +3.

Even though the same +X for a magic weapon is normal, and some weapons have specfic extra effects, it seems a dodgy for spells, because that is +X for every spell attack roll, with all their different extra effects covered. But then +3 save DC for "save or suck" spell effects, like 1st level Ray of Sickness or 4th level Polymorph, just seems way out there at any character level.

Question: Am I overreacting, is there something I am not seeing? Or is this drum, and any similar item, just something which a balance-concerned DM should not allow anywhere near their table, or maybe limit it to +1 version and making that very rare or something?


Reminder: I’m not asking for opinions. An answer like "it’s fine" or "it’s broken" must be backed up by facts (other items, rules quotes, sage advice…).

Question regarding Pact magic with multiclassing and a class specific bonus

I play a 6 bard/ 4 warlock multiclass. My character recently obtained a rhythm makers drum +3, giving a +3 bonus to my bard spells’ DC and rolls.

I am curious if I were to cast a spell I had taken on my warlock list (hold person) with a bard spell slot, would the bonus increase the DC? DnDB added the bonus to all my characters spells (I know that isn’t right) but thought it may be applicable if a spell is on both lists.

Thank you in advance.

Does a Warlock receive the benefit of their familiar’s Magic Resistance trait?

The Warlock has access to special forms for their find familiar spell through the Pact of the Chain feature. I’m wondering if these special forms, the Quasit, Imp, and Pseudodragon in particular, allow the player character to share the familiar’s Magic Resistance feature. In the Monster Manual each of these creatures has a sidebar that states that the familiar shares its Magic Resistance feature with the companion they are bonded to, but the PHB doesn’t mention this in any of the creatures’ stat blocks.

For example, in the Variant: Pseudodragon Familiar sidebar on page 254 of the MM it says:

“While the pseudodragon is within 10 feet of its companion, the companion shares the pseudodragon’s Magic Resistance trait.”

This feature seems clear in the MM but I’m led to believe that it wasn’t intended for Player Characters since mention of it is absent from the stat blocks in Appendix D of the PHB (pages 307-309).

Would a 3rd level warlock who chose one of these familiar forms through the Pact of the Chain feature benefit from advantage from saving throws from spells and other magical effects due to these special forms, or was this feature only meant for powerful NPCs and enemy spellcasters who had made this link with these familiars themselves?

Can Magic Mouth be used to speak the verbal component of a spell?

Could a wizard use the magic mouth ritual on an item, telling it to repeat the Verbal Component of a specific spell when the wizard touches said item, thus allowing a wizard to cast a Verbal spell without speaking? I realise that this would only ever be situationally useful, but I’m just curious to see if I am interpreting the rules on both the Magic Mouth ritual and verbal components correctly.

Are the Book of Shadow or Genie’s Vessel granted by Warlock features considered as magic items?

Basically the title.

If a Warlock fights by wielding their Book of Shadow or Genie Vessel in one hand as a spell focus and keeps the other one empty to meet the requirement of somatic component, they will eventually end up in situations where they are forced to use the book or vessel as an improvised weapon (like when an enemy closed the distance or when the Warlock needs to perform an Opportunity Attack). So the question is, would hitting someone with the spine of the book of shadow or their oil lamp of a Genie Vessel be considered using an improvised weapon with magical properties?

For the Vessel, It is a tiny object, but not specifically written as "a magical tiny object" even if the previous sentence mention that the patron has imbued magical powers with it. The Warlock can do lots of wacky stuff with it like sleeping in it or dragging others into it to rest, but it almost seems like its the power of the Class Feature using the item in question as the medium in which the feature’s power (and thus your Patron’s power) is expressed, and not the power of the Item proper.

Genie’s Vessel ; 1st-level Genie feature ; Your patron gifts you a magical vessel that grants you a measure of the genie’s power. The vessel is a Tiny object, and you can use it as a spellcasting focus for your warlock spells. You decide what the object is, or you can determine what it is randomly by rolling on the Genie’s Vessel table.

The book of shadow is even more vague; it is only stated to be a grimoire, and nothing else about it’s materalistic properties are mentioned or explained further other than that if its lost or destroyed you can resummon it. How durable is it, anyway?

This also opens some icky boxes like "Would anti-magic fields suppress their magical properties or destroy them outright?" and something like "If the Genie’s Vessel is indeed a magic item and using it as an improvised weapon can pierce resistance, the Genie Warlock has access to a magical weapon that is basically the equivalent of a +0 but magical dagger at LV1" etc.

I am aware that some similar questions have been asked, like "Does attacking with an improvised weapon using a magic item count as a magical attack?" and "Are punches with Gauntlets of Ogre Strength magical, improvised weapon attacks?"; but the main issue here is that the vessel’s status as a separate magical item seems to be a bit unclear.

PS: Before someone says that using it as an improvised weapon is a poor choice of tactics, keep in mind that Genie Warlocks gain extra damage from the "Genie’s Wrath" Feature equal to their proficiency bonus. Compared to wielding a regular dagger with the damage of 1d4 + dex + pb, using the Genie’s Vessel as an improvised weapon of 1d4 + str + pb isn’t that bad; and depending on how the DM would rule it could be counted as magical and be able to pierce resistances.

5e: Artificer: Does infused magic item count against maximum number of infusions?

I would assume the answer is ‘no’ but I wanted to check.

It feels very odd to be able to replicate (up to) 4 magic items at level 2, but only ever be able to use two of them at a time at that level, because it just saves you a bit of money early on, Or, for example, if you replicate a bag of holding, you can only ever have one other infusion active.

I have seen a few people claim that the replicate magic item infusion does not count against the standard 2 max infusions (at level 2). Just that you are limited to having only 1 replica of your chosen magic item at any one time. The claim is that (TCOE p12) the reference to an ‘infusion ending on a bag of holding’ is only applied if you attempt to make a new bag of holding, but I wanted to ask what other’s thought

I like this second option better, as it means you can play more with your enhancement infusions and so that if you ever want to change your other infusions, you don’t have to constantly pick up every item that pops out of your bag of holding (since it would be the oldest infusion every other time, you would have to re-create the infusion and put everything back into the bag)

could I use something like a magic amulet while it’s not on my neck? [duplicate]

What is defined as ‘worn’? Does an amulet or ring have to be on my neck or finger specifically or do I just have to be carrying it somewhere on my body or even in my backpack? For instance, if I had a Clockwork Amulet on my belt, does that constitute as me ‘wearing’ it so I could use it?

Should casting Confusion centered on yourself from Wild Magic Surge be trivial to end because it’s a concentration spell?

The entry for a roll of 13 or 14 on the Wild Magic Surge table is:

You cast confusion centered on yourself. (PHB, emphasis mine)

Confusion is a 4th level concentration spell. The rules for concentration state that:

If a spell must be maintained with concentration, that fact appears in its Duration entry, and the spell specifies how long you can concentrate on it. You can end concentration at any time (no action required). (PHB)

The intent of the entry on the Wild Magic table seems to be for everyone nearby, including the caster, to be hit by confusion, essentially a less-bad version of casting Fireball centered on yourself. However, since the table doesn’t specify anything special about concentrating on the spell, the caster needs to maintain concentration on it, and consequentially the spell should end if they stop concentrating on it.

RAW, is there any reason someone who rolls this result on the Wild Magic Surge table couldn’t immediately drop concentration and end the spell?