Is this homebrew magical cape of defense balanced?

This is basically a dialed down version of the Bracers of Defense

Cape of Defense

Wondrous Item, uncommon (requires attunement)

While wearing these cape, you gain a +1 bonus to AC if you are wearing no armor and using no shield.


The changes are:

  • Cape instead of bracers.
  • AC+1 instead of AC+2
  • Uncommon instead of Rare.
  • Price: 1500gp instead of 6000gp (according to Sane Magical Items).

Does this keep the balance for the item?

Can a Centaur wear (and benefit from) magical horseshoes?

Related: Can a Minotaur wear (and benefit from) Horseshoes of Flame?


Items in Question

Horseshoes of Speed

These iron shoes come in sets of four like ordinary horseshoes. When affixed to an animal’s hooves, they increase the animal’s base land speed by 30 feet; this counts as an enhancement bonus. As with other effects that increase speed, jumping distances increase proportionally. All four shoes must be worn by the same animal for the magic to be effective.

Horseshoes of a Zephyr

These four iron shoes are affixed like normal horseshoes. They allow a horse to travel without actually touching the ground. The horse must still run above (always around 4 inches above) a roughly horizontal surface. This means that nonsolid or unstable surfaces can be crossed, and that movement is possible without leaving tracks on any sort of ground. The horse moves at its normal base land speed. All four shoes must be worn by the same animal for the magic to be effective.

(emphasis: bold)


Creature in Question

Centaur

Size/Type: Large Monstrous Humanoid

centaur


Dilemma

As can be seen above, a centaur is not an animal. The two magic items above only refer to horses and/or animals.

I am thinking it would require Use Magic Device:

Emulate a Race

Some magic items work only for members of certain races, or work better for members of those races. You can use such an item as if you were a race of your choice. You can emulate only one race at a time.


Questions

  1. Could a centaur wear (and benefit from) the magical horseshoes?
  2. Would a Use Magic Device skill check be required to utilize them?

Can a Centaur wear (and benefit from) magical horseshoes?

Related: Can a Minotaur wear (and benefit from) Horseshoes of Flame?


Items in Question

Horseshoes of Speed

These iron shoes come in sets of four like ordinary horseshoes. When affixed to an animal’s hooves, they increase the animal’s base land speed by 30 feet; this counts as an enhancement bonus. As with other effects that increase speed, jumping distances increase proportionally. All four shoes must be worn by the same animal for the magic to be effective.

Horseshoes of a Zephyr

These four iron shoes are affixed like normal horseshoes. They allow a horse to travel without actually touching the ground. The horse must still run above (always around 4 inches above) a roughly horizontal surface. This means that nonsolid or unstable surfaces can be crossed, and that movement is possible without leaving tracks on any sort of ground. The horse moves at its normal base land speed. All four shoes must be worn by the same animal for the magic to be effective.

(emphasis: bold)


Creature in Question

Centaur

Size/Type: Large Monstrous Humanoid

centaur


Dilemma

As can be seen above, a centaur is not an animal. The two magic items above only refer to horses and/or animals.

I am thinking it would require Use Magic Device:

Emulate a Race

Some magic items work only for members of certain races, or work better for members of those races. You can use such an item as if you were a race of your choice. You can emulate only one race at a time.


Questions

  1. Could a centaur wear (and benefit from) the magical horseshoes?
  2. Would a Use Magic Device skill check be required to utilize them?

How do I know if an ability is magical?

There is often confusion when the anti magic field spell is used, armor of invulnerability is worn, or the Beholder’s anti-magic ray is employed, whether a given character’s ability will still function. The spell does give you some guidelines on how to adjudicate the effects of the loss of magic, but says very little about how to determine what is affected. In short, how do I tell if an ability is magical?

Do class features that give a flying speed count as magical in relation to falling rules?

There are some classes, like the vengeance paladin’s capstone or the Tempest Cleric’s 17th level Stormborn feature, that grant a flying speed to a creature.

Is this considered ‘magical’ flight or is it mundane flight?

I’m thinking of this with regard to the rules on falling when a creature has their speed reduced to 0 or if knocked prone:

If a flying creature is knocked prone, has its speed reduced to 0, or is otherwise deprived of the ability to move, the creature falls, unless it has the ability to hover or it is being held aloft by magic

Can Sneak Attack deal magical damage?


Premise

Sneak Attack, like Divine Smite, is not weapon damage according to the ruling for the Great Weapon Fighting fighting style. Consider a weapon such as the Sun Blade that is finesse and can be used two-handed. The Sneak Attack damage is not applicable for the GWF re-rolls, because the damage isn’t from the weapon according to the cited ruling.

Question

If it’s not weapon damage, then what kind of damage does Sneak Attack do? Can Sneak Attack deal magical damage?

Alternatively, does no contradiction exist, in which case GWF re-rolls would be applicable to Sneak Attack damage?

Where in the rules, errata, or tweets is this clarified?

Magical attacks and overcoming damage resistance

I got hit with an argument from one of my players the other day, and it goes like this:

He is playing a Monk and his unarmed attacks count as magical attacks. He was trying to punch a Web. I told him his bludgeoning attacks did no damage since it was immune to bludgeoning damage. My party disagreed with me, on the basis that his unarmed attacks are magical.

My question to this group is… In cases like fighting a werewolf it says ‘resistance bludgeoning from non-magical attacks’ but other creatures in the game it just say it is ‘resistant to bludgeoning’.

Do magical weapons and attacks cancel out the resistance if it does not specifically say so?
Or
Are these creatures resistance or immune to that damage type regardless of the weapon used?

What happens if the item that created a magical effect ceases to exist?

Let us assume that I have an item bearing two charges of Imitate (Creation 30) as an Automatic Spell (Prometheum Exxet).

Using one charge of Imitate, I duplicate the object.

Using the charge of Imitate on the object I have duplicated, I duplicate the original object.

I continue duplicating the original object with its duplicates for an hour.

What happens when the timer runs out on the first duplicated object?

Does Feeblemind produce an ongoing magical effect that can be dispelled?

Feeblemind has a duration of instantaneous. However, it also produces an ongoing effect, and the spell’s text describes when this effect ends (emphasis added):

At the end of every 30 days, the creature can repeat its saving throw against this spell. If it succeeds on its saving throw, the spell ends.

The spell can also be ended by greater restoration, heal, or wish.

The fact that the text refers to the spell ending, as opposed to just “the effect” or something similar, implies that it produces an ongoing magical spell effect, which can be dispelled using Dispel Magic. However, it has also been argued that any effects that persist beyond a spell’s stated duration cannot be considered magical (with the classic example being fires started by a Fireball spell). Applying this rule to Feeblemind, it shouldn’t have any ongoing effects since its duration is instantaneous. So, which is it? Are the ongoing effects of Feeblemind considered magical and therefore susceptible to effects like Dispel Magic, or are are they simply the lingering result of the initial shattering of the creature’s intellect and personality?

(Note that the final sentence quoted above does not by itself rule out Dispel Magic and other ways of ending the spell. It gives additional options for ending the spell, but it doesn’t say these are the only options.)

Flameskull resistant to magical piercing damage?

Most creatures in D&D 5e have specifics on what attacks or weapon damage types they are resistant to. For example

Damage Resistances: Bludgeoning, Piercing, and Slashing From Nonmagical Attacks

However, the description of the Flameskull entails resistance to piercing damange without the phrase “From Nonmagical Weapons/Attacks.”:

Damage Resistances: lightning, necrotic, piercing

Flameskull, Monster Manual, pg. 134

Wouldn’t that mean the Flameskull is resistant to magical piercing damage as well as non-magical piercing damage?