Magical Lineage/Bloodline Arcana interaction

Magical Lineage says:

Benefit: Pick one spell when you choose this trait. When you apply metamagic feats to this spell that add at least 1 level to the spell, treat its actual level as 1 lower for determining the spell’s final adjusted level.

Arcane Bloodline’s Bloodline Arcana says:

Whenever you apply a metamagic feat to a spell that increases the slot used by at least one level, increase the spell’s DC by +1. This bonus does not stack with itself and does not apply to spells modified by the Heighten Spell feat.

If I apply “+1 spell level” metamagic (such as Extend Spell) to the spell chosen with Magical Lineage, does the DC of the spell increase, even though the final adjusted level of the spell remains the same as that of the base spell?

Magical Lineage/Bloodline Arcana interaction

Magical Lineage says:

Benefit: Pick one spell when you choose this trait. When you apply metamagic feats to this spell that add at least 1 level to the spell, treat its actual level as 1 lower for determining the spell’s final adjusted level.

Arcane Bloodline’s Bloodline Arcana says:

Whenever you apply a metamagic feat to a spell that increases the slot used by at least one level, increase the spell’s DC by +1. This bonus does not stack with itself and does not apply to spells modified by the Heighten Spell feat.

If I apply “+1 spell level” metamagic (such as Extend Spell) to the spell chosen with Magical Lineage, does the DC of the spell increase, even though the final adjusted level of the spell remains the same as that of the base spell?

Artificer battle smith wants to make magical armor, we’re trying to figure out the borders

We’re using the 2019 UA Artificer (from the DND Beyond site).

Situation

I am the DM. The PC is level 3 (getting to level 4 pretty soon) and he wants to start going into crafting magical armors because he feels its part of his class identity.

Now, I understand its generally up to me to decide what is suitable and what is not, but we try to figure a balanced way to handle this, in which he can have creative ideas and magic items still feel wondrous.

The examples I gave him, from what I understood from the PHB and DMG books, is that he either finds a formula, or creates one.
I mostly understand the other parts, we are discussing the creation of a formula. We’re trying to understand the basics and go up from there for our understanding’s sake with creating a common magic item.

We’re trying to be as true to the “original” world of D&D as we’re both pretty new and he really likes trying to “outfigure” the system; not by cheating it, but by thinking of clever ways in which to use it.
He offered two examples:

  1. One is trying to infuse a piece of armor with Heroism spell, in a way that once a day a humanoid who wears it and expresses bravery (judged by the piece itself) it gives it 1d4 temporary hit points, or something like that.
    Which sounded cool and okay with me.

  2. The second example was infusing a pair of boots (Leather worker’s tool?) with Expeditious Retreat. Which sounded really bad with me. He couldn’t describe how it will do it, just that its infused with the magic and is “cast” the same way normal Expeditious Retreat is cast, which just says “This spell allows you to move at an incredible pace.” He said he wants the boots to have the spell active at all times, and I figured it would make it a rare or very rare item? (which he can’t create).

We’re trying to go for a as “realistic” to the world approach as we can. How would you approach this?

Does a barbarian’s damage resistance from Rage apply to damage from magical weapons?

As someone who typically GMs, I’m accustomed to seeing resistances specified in monster stat blocks as “resistant to bludgeoning, piercing and slashing damage from non-magical weapons”.

However the barbarian class feature Rage states that a benefit of raging is “You have resistance to bludgeoning, piercing, and slashing damage,” neglecting any mention of magical weapons.

Though PCs encountering magical weapons may be rare, are there any other rules which stipulate that the basic rage resistances don’t apply towards magical weapons?

What is considered magical light for the purposes of the Darkness spell?

The Darkness spell says (PHB 230):

…nonmagical light can’t illuminate it.

it also specifies:

If any of this spell’s area overlaps with an area of light created by a spell of 2nd level or lower, the spell that created the light is dispelled.

So my question is: what is considered magical light? is it only light from a spell or would light from a magical item (for example flametongue sword) also be considered magical and, if so, what level would that light be considered?

Does the Ranger Planar Warrior bypass resistance to non magical attacks

Some creatures have:

Damage Resistances bludgeoning, piercing, slashing from nonmagical attacks

Does that apply to the Planar Warrior ability, since the attack is made from a normal weapon, but the damage is changed into force damage?

Planar Warrior

At 3rd level, you learn to draw on the energy of the multiverse to augment your attacks.

As a bonus action, choose one creature you can see within 30 feet of you. The next time you hit that creature on this turn with a weapon attack, all damage dealt by the attack becomes force damage, and the creature takes an extra 1d8 force damage from the attack. When you reach 11th level in this class, the extra damage increases to 2d8.

Does the Way of Shadow monk’s Shadow Step feature count as a magical ability?

The Way of Shadow monk’s Shadow Step feature says (PHB, p. 80; emphasis mine):

At 6th level, you gain the ability to step from one shadow into another. When you are in dim light or darkness, as a bonus action you can teleport up to 60 feet to an unoccupied space you can see that is also in dim light or darkness. You then have advantage on the first melee attack you make before the end of the turn.

In D&D 5e, does Shadow Step count as a magical ability? Or is it more of the ninja-like reflexes using those abilities to move within shadows? I get the word used is “teleport” which, in the general D&D world would be considered magical, but based on the context, it doesn’t seem to be a magical ability.

For example, on the D&D Beyond website, in the text description of Shadow Step, the word teleport is not linked to the teleport spell, whereas Cloak of Shadows does reference invisible as a link. Also Shadow Step is not under the Shadow Arts section where Ki can be used to duplicate certain spells. These separations make me think it’s not really magical.

I’m asking specifically regarding its use in the Waterdeep: Dungeon of the Mad Mage adventure. My understanding is that all magic doesn’t work the same way in there so wondering if Shadow Step would be affected there seeing how it’s not mentioned as a spell and/or magical.

Do the Gauntlets of Blazing Fury make Improvised Weapons magical?

The Gauntlets of Blazing Fury, a magic item in a D&D 5th Edition adventure, have the following property amongst others:

While you wear both of these steel gauntlets, any non-magical weapon you grasp with either gauntlet is treated as a magic weapon.

Would those Gauntlets make Improvised Weapons be treated as magical?

Reminder on Improvised Weapons rules:

Sometimes characters don’t have their weapons and have to attack with whatever is at hand. An improvised weapon includes any object you can wield in one or two hands, such as broken glass, a table leg, a frying pan, a wagon wheel, or a dead goblin.

Often, an improvised weapon is similar to an actual weapon and can be treated as such. For example, a table leg is akin to a club. At the DM’s option, a character proficient with a weapon can use a similar object as if it were that weapon and use his or her proficiency bonus.

How are magical effects on a creature copied/transferred when a spell copies/shapechange a creature by “removing” its equipment?

This becomes important when a spell such as Simulacrum or True Polymorph or any other shapechanging spell that affects equipment is cast.

Say I make a Simulacrum of an orc that is armed with an axe and the orc has a Haste spell on it. The spell says that the copy won’t have any equipment.

But will it have the Haste spell on it?

What about permanent magical effects instead?

What about instantaneous magical effects?

What about “powerful” magical effect? Let’s say, a deity makes some kind of “divine wish” (stronger than a normal Wish) to basically mechanically implement one of these two magical effects to a creature:

  • Instantaneous: Creature gets a +2 bonus to Strength.

or

  • Instantaneous: Creature gets a +2 increase to Strength.

So, even if that orc had divine-boosted strength, would a Simulacrum of it benefit, or not, from such extreme magics?

In short: Are magical effects copied over, and (if yes) to what degree?

Anything in the RAW rules supporting either interpretation?