(5e) Are there any magic items that allow a user to bypass fire resistance with a magical weapon?

A bit of a specific request I know, but for an upcoming battle my DM is throwing at us, I’ll be using a magical weapon that deals fire damage and we know the creature has fire resistance. So I was wondering if there were any options to ignore the opponent’s fire resistance. I know of the Elemental Bane spell already, but if there were any other spells that had this effect as well that would be helpful to know as well.

Would it be unbalanced to allow the Darkvision spell to see through magical darkness?

Darkvision is so prevalent among races that the spell Darkvision rarely sees use. Even with casters who do not have darkvision, it still seems unlikely to be taken, as a cantrip is able to provide light, and the situations where the caster without darkvision cannot use light sources are rare enough that it does not justify the spell slot or even having the spell prepared/on their spell list. To add more value to the spell, I’d propose the following changes (bolded below):

Darkness
2nd-level transmutation
Casting Time: 1 action
Range: Touch
Components: V, S, M (either a pinch of dried carrot or an agate)
Duration: 1 hour
You touch a willing creature to grant it the ability to see in the dark. For the duration, that creature has darkvision out to a range of 60 feet. This darkvision is able to see through magical darkness.

There are 2 changes present:

  1. Duration: With the other proposed changes, if this spell remained an 8 hour spell it would become a must have, basically ensuring multiple allies (Through multiple castings) can see through any darkness for a full adventuring day. Keeping this down to 1 hour puts pressure on using it at the right time, and the spell will not remain active through a short rest.
  2. Magical Darkness: This is the big change, that I think gives the spell appeal. If you are expecting magical darkness you can be prepared, or if you are planning on using magical darkness you can ensure you and maybe some allies are still able to function within it.

Does this appear balanced as a second level spell? Would it be better suited at a higher level? I think second level is still viable, as the other methods of obtaining darkvision in magical darkness are available to the Warlock at 2nd level (Devil’s Sight), and the Sorcerer at 3rd level (though only through their own Darkness spell).

Which class gives most new magical powers for 1 level dip

Background: I have a bard, who is a bit lacking in low level spell selection, so I’ve been looking into multiclassing to get some more.

Stats (you can give +2 ASI for the benefit of multiclassing):

STR 11, DEX 17, CON 14, INT 9, WIS 14, CHA 20

So, Wizard is out.

For classes that pick subclass at level 1, subclass features count of course.

From what I have gathered from unofficial internet snippets, Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything seems give some nice options (like 4 cantrips and 5 1st level spells?!). But I don’t have that book myself to verify, and I may have missed other options, so the question:

What is the most different spells or spell-like powers a 1-level multiclass dip can give?

To clarify: I mean spells the character can actually have available, not the number they can choose from. I also realize now, that divine casters who pick spells every morning are their own category, not directly comparable. Still, for purposes of this Q, count the daily prepared spells.

Bard isn’t option for me, so I’ll include it as an example: 4 cantrips, 2 spells, 1 magical ability (Bardic Inspiration).

UA is ok, though I’d prefer official classes.

VtM magical artifact

In a current "Vampire the masquerade" game, my character (settite) was offered 1 magical item of my choosing from a group of mages. As this is a very rare occurrence, I don’t wish to blow my chance at something good. (setting is current day Chicago) Any suggestions would be helpful.

Thanks, Benoni

What are the circumstances of Traxigor’s transformation and do they explain how he retained his magical abilities as an otter?

Traxigor is an Archmage with a rather unique morphology, who is encountered during Baldur’s Gate: Descent into Avernus:

Traxigor was polymorphed into an otter years ago, and decided he preferred the new form to his original one (that of a wizened old man). His otter form was made permanent by a wish spell. He uses the archmage stat block, but is a Tiny beast with a Strength of 3.

What exactly happened here? Are the circumstances of this transformation recorded in any official source material (from any edition)?

This answer establishes that (in D&D 5e) the spell polymorph would not allow a spellcaster to retain their spellcasting abilities while polymorphed into a beast, and this answer establishes the same for true polymorph. On the surface, this seems like an inconsistency (which wouldn’t be surprising), but do the circumstances of Traxigor’s transformation into an otter resolve this inconsistency somehow?

Can a warlock use Pact of the Blade to restructure a magical pact weapon into a different form?

I don’t have the exact text, but I’m going to be running a Fey Warlock for an upcoming campaign. I remember this for Pact of the Blade at level 3: You may create your pact weapon in any form you wish, and you have proficiency with your weapon.

I don’t have the exact wording, but I know that you can make a magical weapon your pact weapon by spending some time with it, which can be done as part of a short rest.

My question is:

Let’s say the party finds a magical axe that let’s say its a +1 axe. If I make that weapon my pact weapon, then I summon it: can I choose what form it comes in? For instance, taking a magical axe, making it my pact weapon, and then reforming it as, a rapier instead. Or finding a magical weapon with an elemental-alignment, and restructuring it into a weapon better suited for the character?

The only time I could think that you would consider trying this with the Pact of the Blade is if you’re running a dex-based magical warrior, but it was an interesting idea that popped into my head. Does this work?

Are punches with Gauntlets of Ogre Strength magical, improvised weapon attacks?

My Gnoll Paladin just got the Gauntlets of Ogre Strength from Phandelver the other day, and it got me wondering:

  1. Would it be possible/make sense for punches using them to count as an improvised weapon? (Since I’m not punching with empty fists, I’m wearing magical gauntlets)
  2. If so, would punches from a person using them count as magical weapon damage?

What about a DnD’s Broom of Flying used as magical quaterstaff and longbow?

In DnD some people talk about "spear bows". To exaggerate this I came up with a Broom of Flying, which can be used as a quaterstaff and a longbow—both dealing magical damage as weapons made of a magic item.

Please help to find counter arguments, even to ban spear bows from game. There must be a reason, why medieval people aquired longbows only in a case of emergency as melee weapons (esp. when carried with the string relaxed), and never put a metal sting on its ends.