Cores, threads and sockets: what does it mean the calculation $T = tcs$ and the number on windows task manager performance?

Well, suppose then we have an CPU system such as:

Thread(s) per core $ \equiv t$ : 4

Core(s) per socket $ \equiv c$ : 4

Socket(s) $ \equiv s$ : 1

Then, we must to perform a simple calculation such as: $ 4 \cdot 4 \cdot 1 = 16 $

Therefore, in general we have:

$ $ T = t\cdot c \cdot s \tag{1}$ $

I guess that the equation $ (1)$ gives you then the total number of threads which your system can handle simultaneously.

On the other hand, consider the figure, of windows task manager, in the following:

enter image description here

In the red box we clearly see the number of "Threads". So I would like to know:

What is the difference between the number given by formula $ (1)$ and the number given by windows task manager?

What does it mean if a domain does not have any WHOIS information available?

For example, I found two websites that mimic my domain name perfectly eg mydomainname.com, with the two offending websites being mydomainname.bw and mydomainname.br. However the domains are not linked to any IP, nor do they have any WHOIS information available. The only way I can see that they are even registered is if I go to a domain seller that deals with .bw and .br TLDs, they tell me that the domain cannot be purchased. Does that mean the domain is just "reserved" somehow and nobody registered it?

What does it mean to get an email from someone with a different actual sender?

I got a strange email and I just want to confirm my suspicions.

For background, I have my own email server which I set up using iRedMail on a VPS. I have an acquaintance who most likely has be on their address book, although I don’t have them on mine.

I got a highly suspect email with "Urgent! <acquaintance’s name>" as the subject, and a body that just said they need a favour. Looking at the headers of the email, I see that the Sender field is an unrelated university email address from another country, while the From field is my acquaintance’s name and a different email address than the one I had communicated with them in the past.

My hypothesis is that their account got hacked, the hacker stole their address book and is sending a scam to all of their contacts.

My fear is that my own server got hacked, or something. My email setup did not complain about this email even though I have virus scanning, and I expect that the regular checks (DKIM, SPF etc.) were done.

Can anyone confirm my hypothesis?

Rogue sneak attack and what does it mean to be an enemy?

The Rogue can sneak attack if another enemy of the target is within 5 feet of it. What constitutes being an enemy – Hostile intent or hostile actions or just being a passive ally?

  1. An ally of the rogue has the Sanctuary spell up and is within 5 feet of the enemy. The Sanctuary spell continues as long as the warded ally does not attack or casts an attack spell (and maintains concentration). Assuming the warded ally does not attack, would it be considered an enemy for enabling the rogue’s sneak attack?
  2. An ally of the rogue has Gaseous Form active and is within 5 feet of the enemy. Gaseous Form does not allow the ally to attack. Does this enable sneak attack?
  3. What if the ally is a warlock with Cloak of Flies active and damaging the enemy?

[ Politics ] Open Question : I don’t wear a mask, I play football, and I go out with some women and I didn’t get the coronavirus. Does this mean that it is a invention?

I don’t know anyone who had a corona and I’m not going to use these ridiculous masks. My health is that of an ox. Shouldn’t I have died according to the socialist media?

What does the phrase “Simple For Loops” mean in computability theory?

I was reading a Wikipedia page on Primitive Recursive Functions but there is a phrase for describing the simple for loops which I really don’t understand. Can anyone explain this to me?

The Phrase: An upper bound of the number of iterations of every loop can be determined before entering the loop

The Wikipedia page

What does the OGL mean for things based on d20 elements, but which aren’t games?

I’ve been thinking lately about how the Overlord novels/manga/anime are so clearly based on 3e/3.5e/d20/whatever, yet were still commercially published–and, as far as I’m aware, suffered no legal action from Wizards of the Coast.

Much of the “mechanics” of the series (at least from what I’ve seen) are entirely possible within the parts of d20 that are covered by OGL.

Just as an example, let’s look at Overlord‘s spell magic arrow, a clear copy of d20’s magic missile. It’s a 1st-tier spell, equivalent to a 1st-level spell, and it launches an unavoidable bolt of non-elemental (equivalent to force damage, or not having an energy type) magic that deals a small amount of damage and cannot be blocked by normal means. The spell can also create multiple bolts if cast at a higher tier/level, just like how magic missile would (depending on what exactly the Overlord wiki means by this, possibly similar to the Spell Points variant rule, also open content)

By my reading of the OGL 1.(e), “Product Identity” (which, as per section 7, must be agreed to not have any of the following done with it, from 1.(f): “Distribute, copy, edit, format, modify, translate and otherwise create Derivative Material of Open Game Content”; 1.(b) defines Derivative Material as “copyrighted material including derivative works and translations (including into other computer languages), potation, modification, correction, addition, extension, upgrade, improvement, compilation, abridgment or other form in which an existing work may be recast, transformed or adapted”) includes both the “spell” magic missile and the “magical…effect” produced by magic missile, as well as any modification or adaption thereof.

The effects of magic arrow are clearly derivative of magic missile. But the specifics, such as dealing 1d4+1 damage (or what 1d4+1 damage even translates to, beyond rarely being enough to kill a target with one shot), or having a range of 100 ft. + 10 ft. per caster level, or any of those details which pertain to actual d20 mechanics, do not seem to be mentioned in Overlord.

So this brings me back to the question, which is more general than just that single spell. How is it that Overlord‘s use of things which seem like they ought to be forbidden due to being considered WotC’s “Product Identity”, is actually okay? Is it because Overlord isn’t a game (in which case, where are exceptions like this stated in the OGL? Does it have to do with the fact that the above details are generalized into a written/drawn form?)? Is it because magic missile isn’t explicitly designated as Product Identity beyond the proper name of itself as a spell (in which case, what about spells like sleep and animate dead, which Overlord keeps the names of, or elements such as “troll” creatures with high strength and what amount to d20’s Scent/Regeneration abilities?)? Or is it something else entirely?

(Sorry if the formatting of some of this question is a mess, I’m not really used to dealing with talking about licenses and don’t know what’s considered conventional)