D&D 5e Greater Restoration Mechanics, the Undead, and the Soul

A little backstory: My group is campaigning into a village that has been usurped by a peasant wielding a jar that "collects" souls to power a Lich’s phylactery and it is almost full. The item is cursed and the wielder of the jar becomes corrupt carrying out the Lich’s plan, to be resurrected from his chamber inside of a Tomb. The lich promised the peasant that if he were to fill the jar, he would have the power over life and death to save his dying wife. The town and it’s citizens have been corrupted and twisted into the undead by the use of the jar.

The jar is homebrew, as I could not find a similar plot device that made sense mechanically or how souls would react to being bound in a high-power magic item.

One of my players (Dragonborn Barbarian) is world-reknowned for his birth-power of a Greater Restoration spell 3/day on his right hand. (rolled in his background).

He has the idea of using his magical ability on the undead (currently unaware of the jar or how the undead came to be).

I was wondering what I could do to make the role-playing aspects of this awesome for his character but also how would the mechanics make sense? Would the soul be denied to return to it’s undead corpse because of the magical restraint of the jar or would the undead explode or mutate into something more sinister? Does the spell have any effect at all?

My main question: What happens if Greater Restoration is cast on an Undead creature, given these circumstances?

What are the mechanics fro shoving enemies into a bag of devouring

I was scrolling through the DMG and I came across an item called a bag of devouring. It states that if a creature is placed fully inside of it the bag destroys it and if part of a creature is placed in the bag it must make a Str check or be pulled in. What are the limits for this? Could you put the tip of a dragon or tarrasque tail in the bag and if they fail the check they are pulled in. I believe/heard you can put full-sized humans in a bag of holding so would it be possible to put entire people into the bag thus killing them? I just want to know where the limitations of this item lie.

What are the mechanics governing the Home Sweet Home award?

A while ago (last spring) I played a 5e AL adventure and received a story award named ‘Home Sweet Home’ form the DDAL module ‘Battle of Elmwood’.

As written by T. J. L.,

Characters that successfully completed this adventure earn the story reward “Home Sweet Home”. […]

This character has been given a plot of land in Elmwood by the Elmwood Council to use as their permanent residence. This plot of land can be either sized for a comfortably large house in the main area of the town of Elmwood OR about an acre of bare land out in the farmlands for some crops or a ranch, a barn, and a farmhouse. Future Elmwood adventures will have more information about how to upgrade this residence.

What rules govern it? IE, what does it cost to actually build a house? can I add a forge? does it already have a house?

How aware are Forgotten Realms characters of the underlying mechanics of the world?

I have read Are casters aware of spell slots?, but this question is aimed at the mechanics in general, not just spell slots

In our own world, there are millions of people working around the world trying to understand every detail of the world. We have distilled the most basic of physical laws into mathematical formulae, separated every element known to man in the tiniest of particles, measure every aspect of the world and have created experiments that are so delicate that the morning dew on the grass outside the testing facility can throw off results. We’ve even created a global infrastructure meant to share that information for the betterment of all.

Now, I might be overestimating the inquisitiveness of the inhabitants of Toril, but I would be surprised if the Arcane Scholars of Candlekeep or the Red Wizards of Thay or any other of the many academic groups in the Forgotten Realms aren’t investing a large amount of time into working out the mechanics of their world. Stuff like the damage a spell does or the amount of damage a kobold or gibberling can take or the increased potency of an Adamantite improved longsword or any other game mechanic. They might even be going into the deeper statistics of the world, like wanting to quantify how much better one fighter is compared to another, and end up figuring out the Strength/Dexterity/Constitution/Intelligence/Wisdom/Charisma abilities. And maybe, just maybe, they have stumbled upon clues that everything in Toril depends on random chance that a character can have limited impact on.

In our world, a lot of these details don’t really matter as much: it might improve our society in the long run by allowing us to create better technology, but we’re not really going to get better food by improving the accuracy of the Avogadro constant. However, in a magical world where a lot of things revolve around combat, knowing that Magic Missiles do up to 4 damage each and how many of these you’ll probably need to finish off that ogre can really mean the difference between life and death. And knowing just how strong each of your soldiers are and how much stronger each of them will get from that enchanted sword your court merchant bought from an adventurer can end up drastically changing the course of a war.

So I’m wondering: How aware of game mechanics are the NPCs of Toril, and especially the smarter ones who do the magical research or are in positions of power? Are they actively using this knowledge in their quest to improve the world? Is it even possible that someone created a compendium of the entire world that explains this in detail, and is selling this book to enterprising adventurers? And yes, I am alluding to the possibility of the Player’s Handbook being an in-game resource people can buy and read.

What happens to clones a deepspawn created if/when the deepspawn dies? (D&D mechanics and/or lore)

I am running a 5E homebrew campaign where a powerful creature akin to a deepspawn is consuming and creating spawn of powerful beings in various governments and organizations to puppet a growing portion of civilization.

My question is should my players succeed in finding and destroying this creature, what have past editions and/or D&D literature said about the fate of the spawn it had created?

Since this is homebrew I know I can pretty much do whatever I want, but I’m looking for insights into how to handle it so I have a plan in place.

I only have access to the Lost Empires of Faerun 4E book regarding them, and though it goes into detail about how the spawn are created and what the spawns’ capabilities are, it does not mention anything about the spawns’ existence after the deepspawn is slain.

Any examples from D&D literature or rulebooks would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

mechanics of attack and roll damage for hill dwarf figther lvl1 [duplicate]

STR 13 +1
DEX 14 +2
CON 17 +4
INT 15 +2
WIS 12 +1
CHAR 17 +3

so I attack with one hand Battleaxe 1d8 with dueling fighting style:

  1. Attack rolld20 – 16+1 from strength +2 from proficiency with Battleaxe total 19
  2. Now roll for damage – 1d8 + 2 damage from dueling style = rolled 3+2 (dueling)

Is this correct? And on the attack roll do I need to add +1 damage from strength ability score modifier?

What balance considerations should I make if I remove the Corruption and/or Insanity mechanics from Shadow of the Demon Lord?

In Shadow of the Demon Lord, there are mechanics that help portray its dark fantasy world. “Insanity” arises from undergoing stressful situations, whereas “Corruption” accumulates as the the character commits evil or dark acts. Both have tangible effects for the character (a high Corruption character would be impossible to resurrect, for example).

Suppose that a group would enjoy the general underlying gameplay, but not the darkness necessitated by the setting.

If I were to remove Corruption and Insanity from the game, what parts of the system would I have to tailor or remove so that the game remains fair?

Mechanics of moving and acting in a completely dark environment

Are there any mechanical consequences in the game for characters without darkvision when moving and taking actions in a completely dark environment (such as a pitch black forest)?

Are there penalties for moving in the dark when you cannot see?

Is it, for example, possible to use a weapon to shoot at a character standing in light if you are in darkness yourself, or would you suffer from not having light to see the path you are walking, load your weapon etc.?