Pre-Fix Order Numbers by User Role

I currently have orders set with the pre-fix "W" for Wholesale orders to differentiate them from Retail orders. However, we have a few different wholesale roles and I would like to be able to differentiate those orders with a pre-fix as well. Is there a way to code a special pre-fix based on user role? The role in particular would be for a wholesale role labeled as employee. Since Employee falls under the Wholesale Role, it is getting the W prefix to their orders. I would like all other wholesale orders to have the W prefix, Employee orders to have an E prefix, and all retail orders to have no prefix (remain as-is).

Here is the snippet that works for wholesale orders to have the W prefix:

add_filter( 'woocommerce_order_number', 'change_woocommerce_order_number' ); function change_woocommerce_order_number( $  order_id ) {       $  prefix = 'W'; //The Prefix      $  order_type = get_post_meta( $  order_id, '_wwpp_order_type',true); //get Wholesale Order Type           if ($  order_type == 'wholesale') {         $  new_order_id = $  prefix . $  order_id;         return $  new_order_id;     }           return $  order_id; } 

Are number counters on websites ever linked to anything, or are the numbers all hardcoded in the html?

Can a website have a number counter linked to something, like if they want to show the real-time count of their twitter followers?

From what I’ve searched, the numbers in number counters are hard-coded (ie https://elfsight.com/number-counter-widget/ or https://codepen.io/shivasurya/pen/FatiB).

Are there any websites whose number counters are linked to something, so I can look into them. Or is there a method one could recommend to do this?

How to plot a set of complex numbers with given argument and absoulute value bounds

I want to plot the following complex numbers $ $ z \in \text{(complex numbers)}:\pi/4 < \arg (z) \leq 5 \pi/4,\ 1 \leq |z| < 2 $ $

I don’t know how to graph it so that it would look like 2D without any unecessary details. The closest I found how I want it to look is, when I looked at how graphing of parametric function looks. I tried to use contour plot to graph it, but I just can’t seem to do it…

ContourPlot[ Im[F[z[x, y]]], {3 pi/4 < arg (z) <= 5 pi/4, 1 <= abs (z) < 2}, {x, -.2, .2}, {y, -.2, .2}, PlotRange -> All, Contours -> Range[-5, 5, .5], ContourLabels -> True]

Does anybody know how to graph my set?

List of equally distanced numbers in an interval [a,b] that contains both a and b

I’m writing a program that should split a given interval $ [a,b]$ into a list of $ \sqrt{N}$ equidistant numbers:

N = 27; a = -1; b = 1; p = 3; Range[a, b, RealAbs[b - a]/(N^(1/p) - 1)]  {-1, 0, 1} 

The result should be a list that has $ N^\frac{1}{p}$ numbers, and that contains both $ a$ and $ b$ . The program works when $ N=x^p$ , where $ x$ is an integer, but fails to include $ b$ in the list when this condition is not met.

For example, when $ p=2$ and $ N$ is not a perfect square:

Np = 10; a = -1; b = 1; p = 2;  Range[a, b, RealAbs[b - a]/(Np^(1/p) - 1)] // N  {-1., -0.0750494, 0.849901} 

Is there a way to specify that both ends, $ a$ and $ b$ , should be part of the list, and then equally split the interval into a total of $ \sqrt{N}$ equidistant numbers?

Divide first n square numbers 1^2, 2^2, ……. n^2 into two groups such that absolute difference of the sum of the two groups is minimum [closed]

lets say Given input is n = 6 (n is as large as 100000) My task is to divide {1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36} into two groups and PRINT these two groups

Possible Solution 1: dividing groups as {1, 9, 36} and {4, 16, 25} which gives abs diff as abs(46 – 45) = 1. So the minimum difference is 1 and the two groups are {1, 9, 36} and {4, 16, 25}

Possible Solution 2: Another Possible Solution is dividing groups as {9, 36} and {1, 4, 16, 25} which gives abs diff as abs(45 – 46) = 1. So the minimum difference is 1 and the two groups are {9, 36} and {1, 4, 16, 25}.

If there are multiple solutions we can print any one. Iam trying to solve it using https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/divide-1-n-two-groups-minimum-sum-difference/ but its not working.

I know that min difference is always 0 or 1 for n >= 6 but how to divide them into two groups.

And can we extend this problem to cubes, fourth powers, so on. if so what is the strategy used

How do I pronounce numbers in game editions?

Most game systems use regular English words for their names. If you don’t know how to pronounce "dungeon" or "dragon", or any other regular word, e.g. Cambridge dictionary is of great help.

Proper nouns are a different story, but, generally, some audio or video exists for popular settings where those words are pronounced as intended by the publisher.

What I am having problems with, though, are numbers. If you want to learn how to pronounce dates, prices, etc. in English, there are thousands of websites where you can do it, and it’s studied as part of all or almost English courses at some point. However, no course that I’ve taken has yet taught me how to pronounce numbers in game editions.

In Russian, the literal translation of how we read "D&D 3.5" is "D&D three point five", and I’ve heard this wording in English, too. But things like "3.5e" or "5e" etc. are ambiguous to me. Not even this rather thorough pronunciation guide has an answer to this problem.

So, how do I pronounce numbers in game system names&versions?