Is there an official source for the properties of stone?

The issue comes up mainly in relation to the spell wall of stone, which states that:

A nonmagical wall of solid stone springs into existence at a point you choose within range. […] The wall is an object made of stone that can be damaged and thus breached. (PHB 287)

The wall is a nonmagical object from the moment it is created. This, to me, reinforces that it is ordinary stone, with all the properties of it. However, the spell unhelpfully neglects to inform us of many of its properties, in particular any damage threshold, resistances and immunities.

Objects are immune to poison and psychic damage. You might decide that some damage types are more effective against a particular object or substance than others. […] Big objects such as castle walls often have extra resilience represented by a damage threshold. (DMG 247)

While we can make up our own ruling, I am interested whether we got any official information that can be applied here.

Is there any officially published material that describes the properties of stone, especially a wall and its resistances, immunities and damage threshold? If yes, what does it say? Bonus points if that wall was created by the spell wall of stone.

What aspects of a setting is official?

Based on this question Is Matt Mercer's homebrew setting now considered an official setting? what parts of a setting official? Is it only what is included in the official book? Is all lore related to the different setting books official? If the author writes a new book that isn’t officially published, is that official for the lore?

It seems to me that only the officially released books would be official and nothing else. If all associated lore is considered official for the setting then books like the Dresden Files is official as well as, all the hundreds of other books out there.

So what is official when it comes to settings?

Is Matt Mercer’s homebrew setting now considered an official setting?

Now that Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount is out, I’m curious to know how much of Matt Mercer’s homebrew content is now considered “official”. Since this is a first-party WotC official D&D sourcebook, does this mean that his homebrew setting and its associated lore is now to be considered an official setting, on par with the Forgotten Realms, Eberron, Dragonlance, etc?

Obviously his rulings and other house rules (basically anything he’s said during his shows that deviates from RAW) are in no way official, no more so than when Jeremy Crawford tweets about how he’d rule something, so I don’t so much care about that.

I’m more interested in his homebrew content, specifically his setting (although I’m also interested in how much of his homebrew magic items, spells, etc, are also considered official–I’m guessing for things like that it’s simply “if it’s in that book, then it’s official”–but the focus of this question is on the overall setting and its associated lore).


Why I’m asking this? This answer to another question of mine somewhat tentatively includes a reference to material from this new book, and since I asked for official lore in that question, I’m somewhat confused about whether or not it really counts as “official lore” (not to scrutinise that answer–I think it’s good to include in that answer anyway; see also my comment under that question that expresses some confusion over this issue).

What official material describes Baldur’s Gate in 5e canon?

Obviously, there’s been an incredible amount of information published about the city of Baldur’s Gate (in the Forgotten Realms setting) across the editions and various media like books, sourcebooks, video games, websites, and so on.

What I’d like to know is the list of official 5e material dealing with Baldur’s Gate.

Or, to paraphrase the question, if we’d like to avoid lists:

I’d like to know how I could and should start a new campaign based in Baldur’s Gate if I wanted to keep things as close to 5e canon as possible.

By “official” I mean everything explicitly reviewed and approved by WotC as part of the official FR canon. (Note, please, that DM’s Guild material does not fit the bill, unless it’s explicitly approved.)

What are the official opposing schools of magic?

I understand that, in some editions of D&D, there has been this concept of opposing schools of magic, and that specialising in one school may prevent you from learning as another (in the context of wizards, that is).

However, I am only familiar with 5e (which doesn’t include this notion of schools of magic opposing each other such that they prohibit learning from another school) and NWN2 (which seems to be arbitrary and fixed; for example, specialising in Abjuration prohibits Conjuration, but specialising in Evocation also prohibits Conjuration! How does that make any sense?), so I do not know where to look to learn of the “official” opposing schools.

Looking online gives me a bunch of contradicting information, ranging from pictures of schools arranged in different orders from one picture to the next (so the opposite of Abjuration in one picture is different from the opposite of Abjuration in the next picture; so which one is correct, then?) to forums talking about choosing which schools to be prohibited from, which goes against this notion of there being a fixed arrangement of opposite schools.

Have I completely missed the point here, or is there an “official” arrangement of the schools of magic such that specialising in one prohibits its opposite?

Note that if this question makes most sense in 3.5e or something, the reason I’ve tagged it dungeons-and-dragons is because I don’t know enough outside of 5e to even know what edition I’m talking about. So if the answer would be different between editions, I would ask that an answer points out these differences if it is realistic to do so.

Is there any official documentation on the AdSense data-adtest=”on” parameter to test locally?

On many places over the internet you can find people suggesting the data-adtest="on" parameter to test ads on your local environment.

<ins className="adsbygoogle"   style={{display:"inline-block", width:"360px", height:"180px"}}   data-ad-client="XXXXX"   data-ad-slot="XXXXX"   data-adtest="on"         // <----------------------------- > </ins> 

I could make it work with trial and error. Some sites even suggest that the proper name is data-ad-test.

But is there an official documentation about this?

I there is, I still haven’t found.

what is the best Dungeons & Dragons Official Homepage for to Start playing

A human in clanging plate armor holds her shield before her as she runs toward the massed goblins. An elf behind her, clad in studded leather armor, peppers the goblins with arrows loosed from his exquisite bow. The half-orc nearby shouts orders, helping the two combatants coordinate their assault to the best advantage.

A dwarf in chain mail interposes his shield between the ogre’s club and his companion, knocking the deadly blow aside. His companion, a half-elf in scale armor, swings two scimitars in a blinding whirl as she circles the ogre, looking for a blind spot in its defenses.

A gladiator fights for sport in an arena, a master with his trident and net, skilled at toppling foes and moving them around for the crowd’s delight—and his own tactical advantage. His opponent’s sword flares with blue light an instant before she sends lightning flashing forth to smite him.

All of these heroes are fighters, perhaps the most diverse class of characters in the worlds of Dungeons & Dragons. Questing knights, conquering overlords, royal champions, elite foot soldiers, hardened mercenaries, and bandit kings—as fighters, they all share an unparalleled mastery with weapons and armor, and a thorough knowledge of the skills of combat. And they are well acquainted with death, both meting it out and staring it defiantly in the face.

Is this homebrew Shifter class balanced compared to the official classes?

One of my players wanted a non-spellcasting druid, is this balanced compared to the official classes?

The Shifter

The shifters, unlike the druids, lack a mystical connection to nature, and do not use nature to cast their spells. Shifters manipulate their magical energy to turn into a variety of creatures to terrify and defeat their foes, and as they do sap their energy for magic, they can transform far more often.

Hit Dice: D6
Hit Points at 1st Level: 6 + your constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d6 (4) per level after 1st

Proficiencies:

  • Weapons: Daggers, Clubs, Sickles, Slings
  • Armor: None
  • Saving Throws: Wisdom, Charisma
  • Skills: Nature, Arcana, and one other of your choice.
  • Tools: None

Starting Equipment:

  • One of
    • A dagger and a sickles, or
    • A sling and 20 bullets
  • An explorer’s pack and a club.

\begin{array}{r r l r r} \textbf{Level} & \textbf{Prof. Bonus} & \textbf{Features} & \textbf{Shift Points} & \textbf{Max CR} \ \hline 1^\text{st} & +2 & \text{Shifting} & 2 & 1 \ 2^\text{nd} & +2 & \text{Cantrip Casting} & 2 & 1 \ 3^\text{rd} & +2 & \text{Subclass} & 5 & 2 \ 4^\text{th} & +2 & \text{ASI} & 5 & 2 \ 5^\text{th} & +3 & & 8 & 3 \ 6^\text{th} & +3 & \text{Subclass feature} & 8 & 3 \ 7^\text{th} & +3 & & 13 & 4 \ 8^\text{th} & +3 & \text{ASI} & 13 & 4 \ 9^\text{th} & +4 & & 21 & 5 \ 10^\text{th} & +4 & \text{Mask of Many Faces} & 21 & 5 \ 11^\text{th} & +4 & & 34 & 6 \ 12^\text{th} & +4 & \text{ASI} & 34 & 6 \ 13^\text{th} & +5 & & 55 & 7 \ 14^\text{th} & +5 & \text{Subclass feature} & 55 & 7 \ 15^\text{th} & +5 & & 89 & 8 \ 16^\text{th} & +5 & \text{ASI} & 89 & 8 \ 17^\text{th} & +6 & & 144 & 9 \ 18^\text{th} & +6 & \text{Shift into Youth} & 144 & 9 \ 19^\text{th} & +6 & \text{ASI} & 144 & 10 \ 20^\text{th} & +6 & \text{Tarrasque} & 150 & 10 \ \end{array}

Shifting

At 1st level, you gain the ability to transform. Choose 3 beasts of CR 0. Those are your cantrip transformations, which you can shift into at will. To transform into creatures of higher CR, you must spend Shift Points as shown in the table below:

\begin{array}{r|r} \textbf{CR} & \textbf{Cost} \ \hline 1 & 1 \ 2 & 3 \ 3 & 5 \ 4 & 7 \ 5 & 12 \ 6 & 17 \ 7 & 25 \ 8 & 45 \ 9 & 75 \ 10 & 100 \ \end{array}

Until you choose a subclass at 3rd level, you can only transform into beasts. When you shift, you can assume the appearance and abilties of any beast. You keep your INT, WIS, CHA scores, but your STR, DEX, and CON scores are replaced with that of the beast. You retain your hit points, but gain temporary hitpoints equal to half those of the beast you transform into. Shifting takes an action, you can revert to human form as a bonus action. You also revert if you drop to zero hitpoints. When you revert to human form, you lose any temporary hitpoints you have. You can only shift while in human form. You cannot cast or concentrate on spells while transformed. You can only shift into a creature if you have enough SP and the creature’s CR is less than or equal to your max CR. You regain all SP after a long rest. Anything you are wearing or carrying is absorbed into your form until you revert, creatures you shift into cannot wield your weapons or armor.

Cantrip Casting

At 2nd level, you gain the ability to cast spells, however, due to your magic energy being sapped for transformation, you can only cast cantrips. You know every cantrip. You must spend 1 SP to cast a cantrip, and the cost of casting a cantrip increases by 2 SP whenever you cast one. Wisdom is your spellcasting modifier for these spells. The cost of casting a cantrip resets to 1 SP whenever you finish a long rest.

Subclass

At 3rd level, choose between the Ooze Order, the Undead Order, the Fiend Order, the Aberrant Order, the Plant Order, the Elemental Order, the Dragon Order, the Celestial Order, the Monster Order, and the Fey Order.

ASIs

At 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level, you can increase an ability score of your choice by 2, or two ability scores by 1, or take a feat. You cannot increase an ability score over 20 using this feature.

Mask of Many Faces

At 10th level, you can cast alter self at will.

Shift into Youth

At 18th level, you stop aging and cannot be aged magically.

Tarrasque

At 20th level, you can shift into a Tarrasque. Once you do so, you cannot do so again for a month. Immediately after you revert, you gain a level of exhaustion that can never be removed, even with a wish spell, even with divine intervention, even if you are killed and revived.

The Ooze Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into oozes as well as beasts. If you shift into an ooze, it costs twice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, you leave a trail of slime behind you. All squares you move through on your turn count as difficult terrain until the end of your next turn.

At 14th level, you gain immunity to piercing damage.

The Undead Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into undead as well as beasts. If you shift into an undead, it costs twice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, you can cast revivify once per short rest.

At 14th level, whenever you would be reduced to 0 hp, make a Wisdom saving throw, the DC for which is twice the damage taken. On a success, you are reduced to 1 hp instead, and the nearest creature is infected with Mummy Rot.

The Fiend Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into fiends as well as beasts. If you shift into a fiend, it costs twice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, any creature that starts its turn grappling you takes 5 fire damage.

At 14th level, you can cast summon lesser demons once per short rest. When you cast the spell using this feature, the creatures summoned are not hostile to you.

The Aberrant Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into aberrations as well as beasts. If you shift into an aberration, it costs twice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, you can speak all languages, are immune to long-term madness, and have expertise in Arcana.

At 14th level, your reach increases by 10 feet.

The Plant Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into plants as well as beasts. If you shift into a plant, it costs twice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, you no longer require food as long as you are in sunlight for at least 6 hours a day. You can cast speak with plants at will.

At 14th level, you are always under the effects of tree stride.

The Elemental Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into elementals as well as beasts. If you shift into an elemental, it costs twice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, after you finish a long rest, choose between lightning, thunder, force, and acid damage. You gain resistance to that type of damage until you take another long rest.

At 14th level, you learn four 1st-level sorcerer spells of your choice. You can cast these spells by spending 15 SP. Wisdom is your spellcasting modifier for these spells.

The Dragon Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into dragons as well as beasts. If you shift into a dragon, it costs twice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, you can treat any Charisma check you make to talk to a dragon as a 15. You also know the location of any dragon within 1 foot of you.

At 14th level, scales form over your body. While you are not wearing armor, you can calculate your AC as 14 + your Dexterity modifier. You can wield a shield if proficient and still use this feature. If you shift you lose this benefit.

The Celestial Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into celestials as well as beasts. If you shift into a celestial, it costs twice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, as a bonus action, you can pick a creature within 30 feet of you and heal them with your SP. They gain temporary hp equal to half the amount of SP you spend.

At 14th level, you gain immunity to disease, the poisoned condition, and poison, and regain 1 hp at the end of each of your turns.

The Monster Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into monstrosities as well as beasts. If you shift into a monstrosity, it costs thrice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, you gain expertise in Intimidation and immunity to fear.

At 14th level, you can spend 50 SP as a bonus action to gain immunity to non-magical damage until the beginning of your next turn.

The Fey Order

At 3rd level, you gain the ability to shift into fey as well as beasts. If you shift into a fey, it costs thrice as much SP as it normally would.

At 6th level, you gain expertise in Persuasion and immunity to being charmed.

At 14th level, choose four 1st-level spells from the bard spell list. You can cast these spells by spending 15 SP. Wisdom is your spellcasting modifier for these spells.