What SAN value is ‘one fifth of current sanity’ measured against to determine indefinite insanity?

The rules for Indefinite Insanity state that it kicks in after a character loses…

a fifth or more of current Sanity points in one game “day”

Given that SAN loss might be occurring at various intervals throughout the day, what is the ‘current sanity’ against which ‘one fifth’ is measured? Is it the character’s SAN at the start of the day?

I am trying to print a string of values from an array with a , after each one. I pass accrueScore 15 10s and get 15 0s back

I explained this in my program. Goal is to have all values int eh array print with a “,” after. I’ve tried to create a new array to store the values but that didnt work. I tried to make a for loop to add the , but that didn’t work. no matter what i do i get 0s back

 //** This is supposed to limit inputs to 15 and either store max min or   /nothing.  Sum the values. As long as the score is between 0 and max */ public void accrueScore(int score){         array = new int[this.MAX_SCORES];         if (score >= 0 && score <= this.points){             this.sum += score;               if  (this.count == 0){             this.max = score;             this.min = score;         }             else if (score > this.max){             this.max = score;         }             else if (score < this.min){            this.min = score;         }             else if (this.count < 15){            array[this.count] = score;         }             else{         }          this.count++;     }      }    // This is the part that i am trying to have print the values from above     public String getScoreList(){       String result = Arrays.toString(array);       return result;     } 

How to make a ‘One Hit and Dead’ platformer feel fair

I am currently making a run ‘n gun platformer, in which the player dies instantly when they get hit. I’m curious how to make this feel fair. I’m aware of putting checkpoints frequently enough, allowing the player to retry almost instantly, and merciful hitboxes. But I’m curious to know how I should go about level design?

You see, games like Hollow Knight let you learn how to avoid taking hits early in the game by giving easy challenges. If you get hit by something unexpected in Hollow Knight, you can always focus and gain some health, and it wouldn’t feel unfair. If that happened in my game, that would feel unfair.

Since I’m designing a Megaman-X like game with a boss at the end of each stage, how am I supposed to go about teaching the player how to dodge fast moving projectiles that you would only know how to dodge after seeing how they act?

And yes, there is going to be a first level before you can go play the other ones in whatever order you like.