SQL30080N error points to two documents SC31-6160 and (SC31-6156

If I face this problem: SQL1476N with sqlerror "-30080", then I check this other error:

db2 ? sql30080   SQL30080N  A communication error "<reason-code>" occurred sending or       receiving data from the remote database. ... Refer to the document IBM Communications Manager 1.0 APPC Programming Guide and Reference (SC31-6160) for explanation of the APPC primary and secondary return codes. For details of APPC sense data, refer to the IBM Communications Manager 1.0 Problem Determination Guide (SC31-6156). 

When can I get information about these documents?

  • IBM Communications Manager 1.0 APPC Programming Guide and Reference (SC31-6160).
  • IBM Communications Manager 1.0 Problem Determination Guide (SC31-6156)

Reference:

https://www.ibm.com/docs/en/db2/11.5?topic=SSEPGG_11.5.0/com.ibm.db2.luw.messages.sql.doc/sql28000-sql33999.html#sql30080n

How to recover void points

I am playing a game of the newest version of legend of the five rings, and cannot find in the book how can you recover void points.

In older editions it usually required a meditation roll or a tea ceremony roll (which now is a level 2 Shuji) or just plain rest.

Or are you supposed to not recover it as usually any more?

Can Lay on Hands be used to both heal hit points and remove diseases/poisons with the same action?

The Paladin’s Lay on Hands feature says:

As an action, you can touch a creature and […] restore a number of hit points to that creature.

It also goes on to say:

Alternatively, you can expend 5 hit points from your pool of healing to cure the target of one disease or neutralize one poison affecting it. You can cure multiple diseases and neutralize multiple poisons with a single use of Lay on Hands […]

Could I opt to do both at the same time? Perhaps an ally was struck by a crossbow bolt with drow poison, and I needed to both heal them as well as remove the poison in one go; is that permissible?

As written, it seems vague. The first paragraph specifies the use of an action to heal hit points, but the second simply indicates an alternative way for the hit point pool to be expended, but doesn’t seem to indicate that the use is exclusive from the first.

How much damage is dealt/taken when that damage also reduces a creature to 0 hit points?

The particular case where this question came up was when a Hobgoblin Warlord attacked my ally, who had 7 hit points remaining. The attack’s damage was rolled for a total of 13, meaning they would fall unconscious. However, I am a Redemption Paladin which means I can Rebuke the Violent:

[…] Immediately after an attacker within 30 feet of you deals damage with an attack against a creature other than you, you can use your reaction to force the attacker to make a Wisdom saving throw. On a failed save, the attacker takes radiant damage equal to the damage it just dealt. […]

The question that arose was how to calculate "the damage it just dealt". Did the Hobgoblin Warlord deal 7 or 13 damage to my ally?


The only thing I found that somewhat answered this was the section on "Instant Death" which includes the following (emphasis mine):

[…] For example, a cleric with a maximum of 12 hit points currently has 6 hit points. If she takes 18 damage from an attack, she is reduced to 0 hit points, but 12 damage remains. Because the remaining damage equals her hit point maximum, the cleric dies.

This seems to state that the Cleric still takes 18 damage, even if her points drop to 0, but then it also states that 12 damage "remains". It’s not what I would call definitive and it doesn’t explicitly state that that is how damage works so I’m wondering if there’s anything that makes this even clearer.

How many hit points does a bedroll have?

The PCs are battling a bat swarm, and lit a bedroll on fire and are trying to chase the swarm away by floating the burning bedroll at the swarm with mage hand.

The bedroll will take 1d6 fire damage each turn, but I can’t find how many hitpoints a bedroll would have (in this case, sized for a halfling). Let’s assume the bedroll is still rolled up, and not spread out.

Rope/cloth has 2 hp per inch of thickness: I guess it’s kind of a GM call?

Edit: a simple google search gives this choice as one of it’s first results. It has a long and short option. If we take the rolled width of the short bedroll (for a halfling), it’s width is 8 inches. At 2 hp/inch, that gives it 16 hp total. That sounds reasonable enough, I suppose. Depending on the fire damage rolls, that’s at least 3 rounds.

Does a force field absorb hit point damage from an attack that would only deplete stamina points?

In Starfinder, personal force fields grant temporary hit points to the user and fast heal those temporary hit points every round for a finite number of rounds. My question is whether the force field provides any protection at all from an attack that would only deplete the target’s stamina points?

If the force field itself had a number of hit points that it would absorb before damage was applied to the user (like a ship’s shields), this would be a simple question–damage would be applied first to the force field and extra over that round’s allotment would be applied to the user’s stamina points and then hit points. But the description of the force field states that it grants temporary hit points to the user and if the user is a player character then they do not lose hit points (temporary or otherwise) until their stamina points are depleted. It seems to me that, rules as written, force fields do not protect stamina points, but since attacks that reduce stamina points do in fact hit the character, a force field should protect them. Am I reading the rules right or am I missing something? Has Paizo clarified this at all?

How many spell points does using an Admixture feat actually cost?

When applying the Admixture talent and an Admixture feat to a destructive blast from the Destruction sphere, how many spell points does it actually cost?

For example, if I apply a Morphic Admixture, how many points am I spending? Assuming I do not spend any points to extend the shapeshift’s duration.

It confuses me because both the talent and the feats cost a point, but the feats replace part of the talent’s effects, raising the question whether you spend 1 point or 2 points.

This uses the versions following Ultimate Spheres of Power.

Admixture Talent from Destruction Sphere

Admixture

You may either increase the casting time of your destructive blast by one step or spend an additional spell point to apply two (blast type) talents instead of 1. The resultant blast does half of its damage of each type and any additional effects of the blast types are applied normally. If the die size for the two blasts are d8 and d6, use d8; if d8 and d4 use d6; if d6 and d4, use d4. If two blast types have different caster levels, then use the lower caster level for determining the admixtured blast’s caster level.

Special: You do not increase the casting time or spend an additional spell point when using the Admixture talent with two blast types from the same blast type group.

Admixture Feat Rules

Admixture feats grant new ways to utilize the Admixture talent (from the Destruction sphere), adding abilities from other spheres to your destructive blast. All admixture feats replace the second blast talent you would normally apply, with the resulting destructive blast dealing normal blast damage in addition to the effect outlined in the feat. Any additional costs incurred by the additional effect must be paid as normal. If your caster level is different for the two spheres, the destructive blast is governed by your caster level for the relevant blast type and the additional effect is governed by your caster level for the appropriate ability.

Morphic Admixture Feat

Morphic Admixture (Admixture)

Prerequisites: Alteration sphere, Destruction sphere (Admixture).

Benefit: When using Admixture, you may spend an additional spell point to have a single creature that takes damage save against a hostile shapeshift. If you possess the Mass Alteration talent, you may apply the hostile shapeshift to all targets damaged, up to your maximum targets from Mass Alteration.

Hit points and damage thresholds for defensive structures

The party is deep into my 5e-updated classic Greyhawk Giants series.

The giants are about to attack the outer walls of the Sterish city of Headwater in an attempt to take the city.

Many monsters, such as the Ogre Battering ram, have the Siege Monster property, which says "The [monster] deals double damage to objects and structures."

The DMG (255, 256) has rules for siege equipment, their attacks, and damage.

On hit points for objects, the DMG also says that stone objects have AC17 (246) and that (247):

An object’s hit points measure how much damage it can take before losing structural integrity. Resilient objects have more hit points than fragile ones. Large objects also tend to have more hit points than small ones, unless breaking a small part of the object is just as effective as breaking the whole thing. The Object Hit Points table provides suggested hit points for fragile and resilient objects that are Large or smaller [Large, resilient objects have a suggested 27 hp]…Normal weapons are of little use against many Huge and Gargantuan objects, such as a…towering column of stone…You can track a Huge or Gargantuan object’s hit points if you like, or you can simply decide how long the object can withstand whatever weapon or force is acting against it. If you track hit points for the object, divide it into Large or smaller sections, and track each section’s hit points separately. Destroying one of those sections could ruin the entire object…Damage Threshold. Big objects such as castle walls often have extra resilience represented by a damage threshold. An object with a damage threshold has immunity to all damage unless it takes an amount of damage from a single attack or effect equal to or greater than its damage threshold, in which case it takes damage as normal. Any damage that fails to meet or exceed the object’s damage threshold is considered superficial and doesn’t reduce the object’s hit points.

So it seems like, RAW, I assign hit points to large (10′ x 10′) sections of a gargantuan (20′ x 20’+) stone wall, assign a damage threshold for the wall, and then apply damage as rolled until the wall fails its structural integrity, at which point the attackers move through the rubble as difficult terrain.

I can’t find any guidance in the DMG for what the appropriate damage threshold would be for a stone wall, or, for that matter, how hit points and damage threshold might vary between a stone wall, a tower (round or square), a gatehouse, etc. While I could, of course, just make these up, I wonder if there is any guidance in other official sources, or at least analogies that can be made with, for example, the vehicle rules (in BG:DiA) or the ship rules (in GoS).

Somewhat Related: How do I account for palisades and other similar defenses in an invasion?

Very related, possible duplicate, but all answers there predate publication of GoS and BG:DiA which this question is specifically soliciting: How should damage thresholds be assigned?