Interaction between potent cantrip and empowered spell: Thunderclap

According to DnD 5e wizard evoker subclass lvl 2 feature Sculpt Spell, you could prevent 1 friendly adjacent creature from taking damage from a Thunderclap cast by your evoker (it would automatically save the CON save and suffer no damage).

Also, according to evoker lvl 6 feature Potent Cantrip, cantrips that would normally do no damage on a failed save now do half damage (including, I’m assuming, thunderclap). Taken to the letter, this would mean that getting the lvl 6 feature Potent Cantrip would be detrimental to your character, at least with regard to the casting of Thunderclap, since the spell would now harm your friend near you? Am I getting this right?

It may well be the case, but it seems a little bit unfair. Could you choose to apply the Potent Cantrip feature only to your enemies when casting a Thunderclap? Could you choose not to apply Potent Cantrip to a given Thunderclap cantrip casting at all to prevent friendly fire?

Can I cast cantrips using spell slots to get a more potent effect? [duplicate]

This question already has an answer here:

  • Can a cantrip be cast using a higher-level spell slot? 3 answers

I am wondering whether I could cast a cantrip, for example Thaumaturgy, using a spell slot to get more than a single effect of the cantrip (i.e. both ominous sounds and alter appearance).

Does a Life Cleric casting Goodberry at higher spell levels get more potent Berries?

My question is derived from a few contradicting pieces of information but I have no direct answer with an example. I’ll first describe the information:

Goodberry, has no cast at higher level footnote in its description:

Up to ten berries appear in your hand and are infused with magic for the duration. A creature can use its action to eat one berry. Eating a berry restores 1 hit point, and the berry provides enough nourishment to sustain a creature for one day. The berries lose their potency if they have not been consumed within 24 hours of the casting of this spell. (P. 246 PHB)

The rules of casting a higher spell level for a spell with no higher spell level footnote say:

When a character casts a spell, he or she expends a slot of that spell’s level or higher, effectively “filling” a slot with the spell. You can think of a spell slot as a groove of a certain size—small for a 1st-level slot, larger for a spell of higher level. A 1st-level spell fits into a slot of any size, but a 9th-level spell fits only in a 9th-level slot.

Now the Contradicting:

From Disciple of Life (Cleric):

Also starting at 1st level, your Healing Spells are more effective. Whenever you use a spell of 1st level or higher to restore hit points to a creature, the creature regains additional hit points equal to 2 + the spell’s level.

And Sage Advice:

If I’m a cleric/druid with the Disciple of Life feature, does the goodberry spell benefit from the feature? Yes. The Disciple of Life feature would make each berry restore 4 hit points, instead of 1, assuming you cast goodberry with a 1st-level spell slot.

So The first part tells me I could use a Level 2 spell slot on a 1st level spell that does not have a empower spell footnote and the spell will be cast at the description of the spell and no more.

The contradiction of the Sage Advice says assuming they use a level 1 spell slot. And the Life cleric says 2+ spell’s level.

Does this mean a Level 1 Spell Slot Goodberry gives 1hp per berry + 2hp Life Domain +1 Spell Level = 4 hp per berry, and a Level 2 Spell Slot 1hp per berry + 2hp Life Domain +2 Spell Level = 5 hp per berry?

Or because the Life Domain clause doesn’t say + Spell Slot level and only Spell level, that a Life Domain Cleric’s Goodberry never gets higher then 4hp per berry?

What is the purpose of the Evocation wizard’s Potent Cantrip feature?

The School of Evocation wizard’s Potent Cantrip feature (PHB, p. 117) says:

Starting at 6th level, when a creature succeeds on a saving throw against your cantrip, the creature takes half the cantrip’s damage (if any) but suffers no additional effect from the cantrip.

As I read it, the feature only affects evocation cantrips that require a saving throw. There are none in of these in the basic rule book. Is this a typo?

Potent Cantrip vs Evasion

A 7th level evocation wizard hits a 7th level rogue with a cantrip that requires a dex saving throw, like acid splash.

The wizard has Potent Cantrip that means any creature that succeeds the dex save will always take half damage. The rogue has evasion which means a save for half damage becomes save for none.

Potent Cantrip: Starting at 6th level, your damaging Cantrips affect even creatures that avoid the brunt of the effect. When a creature succeeds on a saving throw against your cantrip, the creature takes half the cantrip’s damage (if any) but suffers no additional effect from the cantrip.

Evasion: Beginning at 7th level, you can nimbly dodge out of the way of certain area effects, such as a red dragon’s fiery breath or an Ice Storm spell. When you are subjected to an effect that allows you to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage, you instead take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw, and only half damage if you fail.

Since both of these are passive abilities, which takes priority and how much damage does the rogue take if it succeeds the dex save?

Potent Cantrip with Toll the Dead vs Evasion

I’ve been allowing the party’s big bad enemy (a tenth-level wizard) to essentially always do damage with toll the dead. Even against the party’s monk and rogue which have Evasion. And my group is claiming I’m cheating, or reading the rules wrong in my favor. But I thought it was pretty clear. Did I make a (R.A.W.) false ruling?

Potent Cantrip: Starting at 6th level, your damaging cantrips affect even creatures that avoid the brunt of the effect. When a creature succeeds on a saving throw against your cantrip, the creature takes half the cantrip’s damage (if any) but suffers no additional effect from the cantrip.

10th level Evocation Wizard casts toll the dead, and the party’s Rogue makes her required Wisdom saving throw.

Toll the dead: You point at one creature you can see within range, and the sound of a dolorous bell fills the air around it for a moment. The target must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw or take 1d8 necrotic damage. If the target is missing any of its hit points, it instead takes 1d12 necrotic damage.

Evocation Wizard rolls out the damage and divides it in half. Then the argument starts: Our Rogue claims that since she made her save, she actually takes zero damage.

Evasion: Beginning at 7th level, you can nimbly dodge out of the way of certain area effects, such as a red dragon’s fiery breath or an Ice Storm spell. When you are subjected to an effect that allows you to make a Dexterity saving throw to take only half damage, you instead take no damage if you succeed on the saving throw, and only half damage if you fail.

But it specifically says “Dexterity saving throw” so I assumed (perhaps incorrectly) that Evasion simply would not apply in this case, as toll the dead forces a Wisdom saving throw. And made her, and the party’s monk, take half damage. Did I screw over my party?