Prevent ‘reply all’ in Facebook group message

I’m the admin for a Facebook group of approximately 50 members, and I want to send a single message to everyone in the group. I need to use a message because most members of the group do not receive notifications for posts on the group page.

The last time I sent a message to the whole group, a few members started replying in a casual chatty way that spammed all of the other members and led to some of them leaving the group.

Is it possible to send a message to a group that does not allow anyone to “reply all”?

Does Antimagic Field suppress or prevent petrification from a creature ability?

Inspired by this question and in particular, this answer. I’m focusing on a specific effect; pertrification.

If by a medusa’s gaze or a beholder’s eye rays (or other creatures with a similar ability), their abilities give you precisely two chances; the initial save, which if you fail will restrain you as you begin to turn to stone, then a final save, which if you fail again sees you petrified.

From this, I have a couple of closely related questions with regards to how this method of petrification interacts with antimagic field (I decided to split this question up into two sets, since otherwise all 5 questions together made this post too broad; the other set of questions is here):

  • If a creature has been petrified by a creature, as in failed both saves, does antimagic field have any effect on their petrified condition?
  • If a creature is currently being petrified, meaning they’ve failed one save but have yet to make the other save, does antimagic field stop the magical effect and they effectively auto-succeed that second saving throw?

Does Antimagic Field suppress or prevent petrification from Flesh to Stone?

Inspired by this question and in particular, this answer. I’m focusing on a specific effect; pertrification.

For the flesh to stone spell, the process of becoming petrified goes through this sequence: first, you become restrained if you fail a CON save, and must make additional CON saves until you succeed three or fail three, similar to how death saves work. If you fail three before you succeed three, you become petrified.

The flesh to stone spell is a concentration spell, which says (PHB, p. 243):

If you maintain your concentration on this spell for the entire possible duration [1 minute], the creature is turned to stone until the effect is removed.

From this, I have a few closely related questions with regards to how flesh to stone interacts with antimagic field (I decided to split this question up into two sets, since otherwise all 5 questions together made this post too broad; the other set of questions is here):

  • If a creature has been petrified by flesh to stone and the caster has concentrated for a full minute on the spell, does antimagic field have any effect on their petrified condition?
  • If a creature has been petrified by flesh to stone but the caster has not yet concentrated for a full minute on the spell, does antimagic field have any effect on their petrified condition?
  • If a creature has failed their initial save against flesh to stone but they are yet to make their three-of-a-kind saving throws, does antimagic field allow them to auto-succeed the saves and no longer be restrained/turning to stone?

Prevent “invoked too many times per second” error in Google Apps Script

I have a Google spreadsheet consisting of different months on each tab. Every month, I add a new tab and another 50-75 rows. There are many tabs. There is a cell on each row which calls a custom function, like this:

=myFunction(A1) 

The problem I am having is that I am getting the following error:

error: Script invoked too many times per second for this Google user account.

What can I do to prevent this error from occurring?

Is the problem because there are too many tabs, or too many rows per tab?

There must be a way to prevent the function from having to run more than once.


Here is a shortened version of the function that is called:

function myFunction(expense) { if (   InStr(1,expense,"CPC SCP") ||   InStr(1,expense,"CPC/SCP") ||   InStr(1,expense,"xxxx")   )   { category = "5530 - Postage Expense" }     else if (   InStr(1,expense,"PRE-AUTHORIZED PAYMENT") ||   InStr(1,expense,"xxx ")   )   { category = "9999 - Payment" }     else if (   InStr(1,expense,"PURCHASE INTEREST") ||   InStr(1,expense,"RETURNED PAYMENT FEE") ||   InStr(1,expense,"xxxx")   )   { category = "5070 - Bank Charges" }   else { category = "Not Sure" }  return category;    }  

How to prevent logger from writing to stderr?

I have a function to setup a logger.


def setup_logger(logger_name, log_file=None, stream=None, level=logging.DEBUG):     '''     Setup a Logger     '''     logger = logging.getLogger(logger_name)     logger.handlers = []      formatter = logging.Formatter('[%(asctime)s] %(levelname)s: %(message)s',                                   datefmt='%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S')      if log_file:         fileHandler = logging.FileHandler(log_file, mode='w')         fileHandler.setFormatter(formatter)         fileHandler.setLevel(level)         logger.addHandler(fileHandler)      if stream:         streamHandler = logging.StreamHandler()         streamHandler.setFormatter(formatter)         streamHandler.setLevel(level)         logger.addHandler(streamHandler)      return logger 

Using above, say I define the logger with following commands,

my_logger = setup_logger('my_logger', '/tmp/my_logger.log') my_logger.info('This should not appear on stderr') 

Then the output should only go to the log file, and not the stdout or stderr. However, I always get the output on stderr as well, which messes with a progressbar that I intend to use to track progress of another task. Any idea how I could get it to not write output to the stderr?

Thank you.

How can I prevent a user from copying files on another hard drive?

I have a Linux machine that contains sensitive files. Users should be able to access them (read) when they are using the computer, but should not be able to copy them on another hard drive (USB stick or another hard drive that might have been added on the same machine).

The main hard drive has been encrypted, in order to prevent someone from extracting it and stealing the files.

I am free to use SELinux or other approaches in order to achieve the goal.

Prevent apps from turning off the screen

I noticed that a random third party app (Telegram in this case) was allowed to turn off my entire phone screen at a whim while I was using the app for a voice call, as soon as my finger approached the upper part of the screen to pull down notifications.

This happened on my homescreen while the application was not in the foreground, i.e. not at all visible on screen.

Since I was not particularly close to obscuring any sensor with my single finger — which was somehow mistaken for a human head — as well as using earphones which in context obviously renders the feature completely pointless since no sound is coming out of the integrated speaker, I’m wondering how to disallow apps from behaving in this absurdly idiotic way?

In other words, how do I block apps from hijacking and turning off my screen at their discretion?


  • Android 8.1.0
  • Nexus 5X

Does a Skald’s Raging Song prevent spellcasting?

This is the description of the Skald’s Raging Song (Su) class feature:

If a raging song affects allies, when the skald begins a raging song and at the start of each ally’s turn in which they can hear the raging song, the skald’s allies must decide whether to accept or refuse its effects. This is not an action. Unconscious allies automatically accept the song. If accepted, the raging song’s effects last for that ally’s turn or until the song ends, whichever comes first.

[…]

While under the effects of inspired rage, allies other than the skald cannot use any Charisma-, Dexterity-, or Intelligence-based skills (except Acrobatics, Fly, Intimidate, and Ride) or any ability that requires patience or concentration.

Does it prevent spellcasting?

The d20pfsrd entry has a link on the word “concentration” going to the Concentration Rules for spellcasters. But if read on paper, you could argue whether “an ability that requires concentration” equals spellcasting or whether you would need a Concentration Check to cast a spell while under the influence of a Raging Song.