Do I use my druid’s own proficiency bonus for the attacks of their wildshape?

Let’s consider this example: A lvl 12 Druid has a +4 proficiency bonus. They proceed to wild shape into an ape, whose attacks have a +5 bonus to attack rolls, easily calculated to be +3 from its Strength and a +2 proficiency modifier. Does the wildshaped druid attack at +5, or at +7? I’ve seen the first interpretation to be more common but I’d like to know the reasoning for such.

Would it be unbalanced for Dex-based Fighters to choose proficiency in Dex saving throws instead of Str saving throws?

Whilst building a Dex-based Fighter (an Arcane Archer), I decided to pick the Resilient feat at level 4 so that I could have proficiency in Dexterity saving throws, which makes sense given that they are a Dex-based character. Then I thought about how odd it was that they had proficiency in Strength saving throws just because they’re a Fighter even though they’re not a Str-based character. Sure, it makes sense for a lot of Fighters, but not all of them.

Therefore, I’m considering introducing a new homebrew rule for whenever I’m running a game and a player of mine wants to make a Dex-based Fighter:

Saving Throws: Strength or Dexterity (your choice), Constitution

The “choice” would be made at level 1 (I don’t plan on allowing them to switch it back and forth).


Given that this class is the only one listed under the Multiclassing section in the PHB (pg. 163) has having an “or” in their requirements (“Strength 13 or Dexterity 13″), this seems to fit the intent that Fighters aren’t tied to Strength.

The Battlemaster archetype (PHB, pg. 73) also allows either for the saving throw for some maneuvers, again implying that Fighters are supposed to be flexible regarding using Strength or Dexterity:

Maneuver save DC: 8 + your proficiency bonus + your Strength or Dexterity modifier (your choice)”


Would there be any problems with this? They would still be outclassed in Dexterity saving throws by Rogues and Monks once they get Evasion, so I don’t see this stepping on their toes too much (at least not at higher levels), but on the other hand no class RAW allows a choice in saving throw proficiency like this, so would there be any other problems I’m overlooking?

Effects of awarding extra skill proficiency for high intelligence score

After a discussion in my Pathfinder group about D&D 5e, someone threw the (often heard) complaint that intelligence was mostly a useless stat outside of the classes for whom it is a primary stat. Seeing as the knowledge skills heavily depends on the GM’s style, investigation is, in my experience, usually replaced with perception (again partially the DM’s fault) and added to the fact that there seem to be only a few classes that uses Int for their ability.

We eventually came up with a house-rule suggestion :

  • An Int score of 14 grants an additional skill/tool proficiency.
  • An Int score of 16 grants another proficiency.
  • An Int score of 18 grants double proficiency for a single skill (similar to Expertise)
  • An Int score of 20 grants another double proficiency.

Since none of us have extensive experience with the D&D 5e system, we’re not sure if this rule would break the system at some point. Has anyone used a similar rule or sees a reason this might imbalance the party?

Double proficiency from blessing of knowledge

A player in my new game chose knowledge domain gaining blessing of knowledge.

At 1st level, you learn two languages of your choice. You also become proficient in your choice of two of the following skills: Arcana, History, Nature, or Religion.

Your proficiency bonus is doubled for any ability check you make that uses either of those skills.

My player chose two of the skills but had the other two from elsewhere and thus noted double proficiency in all four.

I’m pretty certain that double proficiency is only gained on the chosen two skills, because

  • It was implied in this question: How does the Cleric's Blessings of Knowledge feature interact with the rules for gaining proficiency when already proficient in a skill?

  • It seems like in 5e you do not usually gain double proficiency for skills you might not even be proficient in. I might be wrong on this one.

  • It says "either of those" instead of "any of those" implying that it is of two and not of four. Then again, I’m not a native speaker.

I told the player my reading of the feature and they accepted it without problem, however, they said they find the wording ambiguous.

My question is: Are my assumption above correct and can blessing of knowledge give double proficiency in skills that you might or might not have?

If a feature gives proficiency in a skill you are proficient with, can you always choose any skill to replace that proficiency?

Page 125 of the PHB has this statement:

If a character would gain the same proficiency from two different sources, he or she can choose a different proficiency of the same kind (skill or tool) instead.

This statement is given in the context of character creation, and specifically skill proficiencies given by backgrounds.

Does this rule apply to any feature gained at any level that gives proficiencies, or only at first level?

Language proficiency per week of downtime

One of my players does not speak common as they come from a village the speaks entirely elvish. We are coming up on a couple weeks of downtime in the campaign and another one of the players wants to teach them common. According to the Xanthar’s rules it takes 10 weeks to become proficient in a language, but they would learn some over a couple weeks. My question is how much of a language would a character pick up in that time span? How would they role play speaking common with a limited knowledge?

Where has my History proficiency come from?

I’m new to DnD. I was typing up my character sheet (I’ve decided to do this every now and then as my annotations become more messy), and in the process I didn’t spot any reason for me to have the History proficiency I have.

It’s likely that I just made a mistake when making the sheet, but maybe I didn’t…

I’m a Dragonborn Paladin with an Outlander background and my subclass (Oath) is Redemption. According to this wiki, the race or subclass doesn’t give me any skill proficiency, while the background gives me Athletics & Survival and the class gives me a choice of two from Athletics, Insight, Intimidation, Medicine, Persuasion & Religion; I chose Medicine & Persuasion. So the 4 skills I have from my background and class are Athletics, Survival, Medicine & Persuasion… none of those are History (which I have in addition).

I also noticed an “origin” feature for my background, from which there are 10 origins: Forester, Trapper, Homesteader, Guide, Exile or outcast, Bounty hunter, Pilgrim, Tribal nomad, Hunter-gatherer, and Tribal marauder. The wiki doesn’t give any information on those, and I haven’t got one written on my sheet.

I’m currently Level 4; I don’t believe a level feature has given me an extra skill proficiency so far.

Where might I be getting this proficiency from?
Does my “origin” have anything to do with it?
What are the possible ways of getting a History proficiency?
Have I/my DM simply make a mistake when creating my character?

Does hurling a thrown weapon change the weapon’s category for determining proficiency?

On Weapon Categories says, “A melee weapon with the heavy thrown or the light thrown property counts as a ranged weapon when thrown” (Player’s Handbook 215). (Similar text is absent from the Rules Compendium, but I’m not familiar enough with 4e to know if this absence is an issue.)

With this in mind, if a character who has proficiency with military melee weapons but lacks proficiency with military ranged weapons throws a handaxe—a military weapon—, does the character still receive his proficiency bonus on the attack roll?

That is, when a military melee weapon is thrown does the military melee weapon remain a melee military weapon therefore the character above gains his proficiency bonus with it? Or does the thrown military melee weapon now count as a military ranged weapon therefore the character above does not gain his proficiency bonus with it? Or is this even more—or less!—complex than I’m imagining?


Note: My level 3 battlemind who has Strength 10, Dexterity 12, proficiency with simple and military ranged weapons, and proficiency only with simple ranged weapons will still normally make his ranged basic attacks with daggers—preferring accuracy to damage—, but I want to assess my future options just in case. Also, I know I’m late to the party, and I apologize if this is a topic that’s already been discussed to death elsewhere.