Does the mandatory piloting check at the beginning of a helm phase count as the pilot “acting” for the purposes of a Taunt action?

In starship combat, a successful Taunt captain action imposes penalties on opposing crew members for a period of 1d4 rounds if they "act" during the phase in which the Taunt occurs. To quote the rules (emphasis added):

If you are successful, each enemy character acting during the selected phase takes a –2 penalty to all checks for 1d4 rounds

So if the captain of Ship A Taunts Ship B at the beginning of the helm phase, before Ship B’s pilot has taken their pilot action, then the pilot of Ship B has the option to decline to take an action for that round in an effort to avoid taking the penalty for 1d4 rounds. However, the pilot must roll a piloting check that round to determine which ship moves first. This mandatory piloting check is not a starship combat action, but does it count as "acting" for the purposes of the Taunt?

Does flying while polymorphed into a flying creature count as flying by magical means for the purposes of blizzards?

Icewind Dale is a nasty place, where blizzards frequently turn the frozen wastes into an untraversable nightmare. One of the rules for blizzards included in Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden makes flying nearly impossible:

The wind extinguishes open flames, disperses fog, erases tracks in the snow, and makes flying by nonmagical means nearly impossible. A creature falls at the end of its turn if it is flying by nonmagical means and can’t hover.

Suppose I use polymorph to change into a giant eagle. Does flying as this giant eagle count as flying by magical means?

Is an unsuccessful attack on a creature under the effect of Charm Person “harmful” for purposes of ending the spell?

Consider the following elaborate scenario, which nevertheless actually occurred at our table.

Two PCs, Sophie Sorcerer and Roger Rogue, sneak into the hideout of hapless villain Tarley Target. While hidden, Sophie uses her Subtle Casting metamagic to silently cast sleep, rendering Tarley unconscious without ever alerting him to the intrusion. Sophie and Roger swiftly exfiltrate the sleeping Tarley from the hideout to their camp nearby, where Sophie successfully casts charm person on him. When the sleep spell ends and Tarley awakes, Sophie takes advantage of Tarley’s charmed condition: she dupes him into believing that someone else actually assaulted him, and that the PCs are in fact his saviors. Tarley, overcome with gratitude and having little cause to believe the PCs are really hostile, proceeds to spill his secrets. Once satisfied that she has squeezed every bit of useful information from Tarley, Sophie signals to Roger — who has been quietly, nonchalantly moving into striking position — to kill him. Initiative is rolled. Tarley is ruled surprised. Roger goes first, attacks, and misses.

Does Tarley’s charmed condition end?

The description of charm person says a target that fails its save "is charmed by you until the spell ends or until you or your companions do anything harmful to it." Does an unsuccessful attack count as "harmful" for purposes of charm person? Would it make a difference if Tarley remained unaware of the attack — e.g., because (as happened here) the DM ruled him distracted by Sophie’s riveting conversation?

Related questions:

  • This question asked what "harmful" means vis-à-vis charm person, but only in the context that the charmed condition restricts the charmed creature’s ability to "target the charmer with harmful abilities or magical effects."
  • This question asked whether the target of charm person has to know who damaged them in order for the spell to end, but that presumes damage was actually dealt.

What counts as a sorcerer spell for the purposes of wild magic surge?

Wild Magic Surge:

Starting when you choose this origin at 1st level, your spellcasting can unleash surges of untamed magic. Immediately after you cast a sorcerer spell of 1st level or higher, the DM can have you roll a d20. If you roll a 1, roll on the Wild Magic Surge table to create a random magical effect. A Wild Magic Surge can happen once per turn.

If a Wild Magic effect is a spell, it’s too wild to be affected by Metamagic. If it normally requires concentration, it doesn’t require concentration in this case; the spell lasts for its full duration.

What fulfills the requirements of a "sorcerer spell of 1st level or higher"?

A few options that I can think of for defining a "sorcerer spell"

Any spell that you’ve learned from Sorcerer and that you’re casting through the Spellcasting feature.

This is my idea of the default answer. A sorcerer spell is a spell you’ve learned as a sorcerer and are casting as a sorcerer.

Any spell that you’ve learned from Sorcerer

This is also reasonable. But it opens the door to casting spells through magic items, such as Cape of the Mountebank, triggering wild magic surges.

Any spell on the Sorcerer spell list.

Still reasonable. This would mean that learning the spell Hold Person through Bard’s learned spells and casting it could trigger a wild magic surge, as it’s a spell that’s both on the Bard’s spell list and the Sorcerer’s.

Does a Character with a Custom Lineage belong to a race, for the purposes of racial requirements?

Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything introduces new character options. In the Customizing Your Origin subsection, there is a side panel that details the Custom Lineage options.

This option allows you to, "instead of choosing one of the game’s races for your character at 1st level", select among a few options to shape your character’s origin.

It is unclear if the resulting character is actually part of an official race, for the purpose of picking racial feats, attuning to race specific magic items, or picking race specific subclasses.

What is an ‘appropriate number’ of ‘significant foes’ for the purposes of Never Conquered, Never Feared?

So, I’m giving the players in my campaign a free Story Feat because I think they’re cool from a hand-curated list of choices that they and I feel are appropriate to their characters backgrounds and their motivations.

One of my players has chosen the feat ‘Never Conquered, Never Feared’ from the AP War of the Crown, which states as its goal:

You must individually slay an appropriate number of significant foes in succession, without retreating or withdrawing from a fight.

I’m trying to figure out exactly how to interpret this and would welcome some other peoples’ opinions. Looking at the rules for story feats an ‘Appropriate Number’ of foes is defined as:

These are either creatures whose individual CRs add up to 20, or creatures whose individual CRs add up to 5 times your character level, whichever is greater.

But these rules also define a ‘Challenging Foe’ as:

This is a foe or group of foes with a total CR of 10 or a CR of 3 plus your character level, whichever is higher.

However, the feat’s wording does not state ‘Challenging Foes’ but ‘significant foes’, so can I assume the definition of a Challenging Foe does not apply?

Also, would I be correct in assuming that ‘individually slay’ means ‘by yourself, with no help’?

Does moving behind full cover count as “leaving the opponent’s reach” for purposes of Attack of Opportunity?

Suppose I am fighting an enemy with the usual 5-foot reach. He is standing next to a wall beside an open doorway. I am in next to him in the room. Without leaving his 5-foot range, I move to the other side of the wall. Does he get an attack of opportunity?

                                                 M --------  -----    to  --------M -----  to--------  -----            EM                     E                  E 

Assume that the wall is only a foot thick and is halfway in E’s square and halfway in mine, so that E(nemy) and M(e) are in adjacent squares in the final diagram. But the enemy cannot reach me through the wall, so have I “left his reach” taking an attack of opportunity while in the doorway?

If there was no wall there, I could move to that position without provoking any opportunity attack. Does the wall being there make it easier for the foe to attack me somehow?

Does your analysis change in the 3-dimensional case where the creature potentially leaving reach is an incorporeal creature moving from the square next to an enemy to the square (cube) next to and below the enemy?

Are the spells Leomund’s Tiny Hut and Tiny Hut considered the same spell for the purposes of combining magical effects?

The Player’s Handbook contains the spell Leomund’s Tiny Hut, and the Basic Rules contains an SRD version of this spell called Tiny Hut. The descriptions of these spells are completely identical.

The rules for combining magical effects say:

The effects of different spells add together while the durations of those spells overlap. The effects of the same spell cast multiple times don’t combine, however. Instead, the most potent effect–such as the highest bonus–from those castings applies while their durations overlap, or the most recent effect applies if the castings are equally potent and their durations overlap.

Additionally, the Dungeon Master’s Guide contains a more general version of this rule for combining game effects:

Different game features can affect a target at the same time. But when two or more game features have the same name, only the effects of one of them—the most potent one—apply while the durations of the effects overlap.

These spells notably have different names, but are they considered the same spell for the purposes of applying the rules for combining magical and game effects?

This question was inspired by this quesition concerning stacking tiny huts as a countermeasure against dispel magic.