The power level of the Sword of Sharpness doesn’t justify its very rare rating – am I missing something?

After asking this question about the Sword of Sharpness, I was presented with this answer which distinguishes between the two main features of the Sword of Sharpness:

Feature 1 (emphasis mine):

When you attack an object with this magic sword and hit, maximize your weapon damage dice against the target.

Thus feature 1 only applies to attacking an object.

Feature 2 (emphasis mine):

When you attack a creature with this weapon and roll a 20 on the attack roll, that target takes an extra 4d6 slashing damage. Then roll another d20. If you roll a 20, you lop off one of the target’s limbs, with the effect of such loss determined by the GM. If the creature has no limb to sever, you lop off a portion of its body instead.

This 2nd feature applies to attacks against creatures and has a 1/400 chance of lopping off the creature’s limb.

There is also a third feature to the sword:

In addition, you can speak the sword’s command word to cause the blade to shed bright light in a 10- foot radius and dim light for an additional 10 feet. Speaking the command word again or sheathing the sword puts out the light.

My question: if the first feature doesn’t apply to attacks against creatures, then why is the Sword of Sharpness a very rare weapon requiring attunement? Is there something amazing about cutting off a limb that outweighs its low probability of occurring? I am especially curious since there are many benign ways of creating light, meaning that to me the 3rd feature pales in comparison to the first two. But if the first 2 features don’t synergize at all, then why is this item so rare (and consequently expensive)?

I ask since compared to other magical items of similar rarity, the sword, should it not synergize, seems a bit underpowered. Consider for example the Flame Tongue:

You can use a bonus action to speak this magic sword’s command word, causing flames to erupt from the blade. These flames shed bright light in a 40-foot radius and dim light for an additional 40 feet. While the sword is ablaze, it deals an extra 2d6 fire damage to any target it hits. The flames last until you use a bonus action to speak the command word again or until you drop or sheathe the sword.

Having a constant 2d6 fire damage seems, from a damage perspective, to be greater than the 1/20 chance of dealing 4d6 slashing damage. This sword also produces more light than the Sword of Sharpness.

A similar concern exists with the Scimitar of Speed:

You gain a +2 bonus to attack and damage rolls made with this magic weapon. In addition, you can make one attack with it as a bonus action on each of your turns.

Having an extra attack to use on my bonus action and consistently having +2 to hit and damage also seems to be a stronger option than the 1/20 chance of dealing 4d6 extra slashing damage or the 1/400 chance of lopping off a limb.

Assuming the above to be true, why then is the Sword of Sharpness a very rare weapon requiring attunement? What am I missing?

If my assumptions or arguments are wrong, please tell me, but to me this weapon seems like it should either have a lower rarity or have the first and second features synergize.

To add a higher level of objectivity, I am comparing both its damage output (no maximum damage against creatures, but 4d6 slashing on a crit and the chance to lop off a limb) as well as frequency of using its ability (1/20 to land a critical, 1/400 to lop off a limb) to those of other magical weapons of a similar rarity.

Make Google Search Console ignore missing review and rating

Google Search Console complains that the “review” and “aggregateRating” are missing (optional) on the product scheme

A lot of posts say “Just ignore it, it’s optional”

But we are never ever going to get reviews. As in never.

Is there really no way of turning these warnings so I don’t see the 746 products with these useless warnings, which hide the few products which DO have errors in the descriptions?

I’m tempted to add a 5-star rating and a revivw saying “we like this product” on all products to get rid of the warnings, but I’m not sure it’s a good idea 😉

How would a major buff ability effect challenge rating (stat block modified)

I’m homebrewing a creature that has the ability to summon things that buff its attacks and gives it resistances/immunities. The stat block is shown below.

Toadstool

Huge monstrosity, unaligned

Armor Class 17 (Natural Armor) Hit Points 479 (29d12+290) Speed 15 ft.

STR 24(+7) DEX 10(+0) CON 30(+10)INT 3(-4) WIS 10(+0) CHA 7(-2)

Saving Throws STR +14, CON +15, WIS +7

Skills Intimidation +17, Perception +14

Damage Immunities Poison Condition Immunities Blinded, Deafened, Frightened, Poisoned Senses Darkvision 60ft., Passive Perception 14 Languages — Challenge 24 (62,000 XP)

Amphibious. The toadstool can breathe air and water.
Fungal Body. Any critical hit against the toadstool counts as a normal hit.
Buff. The toadstool becomes more powerful depending on the number of sporecaps summoned, as seen below.
1-4: The toadstool deals an extra 1d10 poison damage on all attacks, it can release an extra boomshroom.
5-7: The toadstool deals an extra 2d10 poison damage on attacks, it gains resistance to all damage from piercing, slashing, & bludgeoning damage from nonmagical attacks, and it can release an extra 2 boomshrooms.
8+: The toadstool deals an extra 3d10 poison damage on attacks, it gains immunity to all damage from piercing, slashing, & bludgeoning damage from nonmagical attacks, resistance to all damage from piercing, slashing, & bludgeoning damage from magical attacks, and it can release an extra 3 boomshrooms. The toadstool must be within 30 feet of the sporecaps in order to gain these benefits.

Actions

Multiattack. The toadstool makes three attacks, one with its bite and two other actions.
Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +15 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 22 (3d10 + 6) piercing damage, and the target is swallowed if it is a Medium or smaller creature. A swallowed creature is blinded and restrained, has total cover against attacks and other effects outside the toadstool, and takes 10 (3d6) acid damage at the start of each of the toadstool’s turns. The toadstool’s gullet can hold up to two creatures at a time. If the toadstool takes 20 damage or more on a single turn from a creature inside it, the toadstool must succeed on a DC 20 Constitution saving throw at the end of that turn or regurgitate all swallowed creatures, each of which falls prone in a space within 10 feet of the toadstool. If the toadstool dies, a swallowed creature is no longer restrained by it and can escape from the corpse using 10 feet of movement, exiting prone.
Sporecap.(Recharge 4-6) The toadstool can use its action to summon 1d4 sporecaps. Sporecaps are large, tree-size mushrooms. The sporecaps buff the toadstool. The number of sporecaps determines how powerful the toadstool is. These sporecaps have 40 (3d10+24) hit points each.
Boomshroom. The toadstool releases 4 (1d8) Boomshrooms. Boomshrooms are small mushrooms that grow and explode, and any creature within 5 feet of the it takes 12(2d12) poison damage.

Ground Pound. The toadstool can hop on the ground, and any creature within 25 feet of it must succeed on a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw, taking 27(3d12+7) bludgeoning damage on a failed save, or half as much on a successful one. This radius then becomes difficult terrain. The toadstool ignores the difficult terrain.

Legendary Actions

The toadstool can take 3 legendary actions, choosing from the options below. Only one legendary action option can be used at a time and only at the end of another creature’s turn. The toadstool regains spent legendary actions at the start of their turn.

Spore Bomb. The toadstool attaches a spore to a creature of its choice within 20 feet of it. This spore explodes at the end of the target’s next turn, creating a 10-ft radius of necrotic gas for 1 minute. Anyone who enters the space of the cloud takes 13 (3d8) necrotic damage for each round they spend their turn inside the gas.
Ground Pound (Costs 2 actions.) The toadstool uses its ground pound.

How would the buff ability affect challenge rating?

How would a major buffing ability effect challenge rating? [closed]

So I’m homebrewing a creature that has the ability to summon things that buff its attacks and gives it resistances/immunities. The ability is shown below.

Buff. The toadstool becomes more powerful depending on the number of sporecaps summoned, as seen below.

1-4: The toadstool deals an extra 1d10 poison damage on all attacks, it can release an extra boomshroom.

5-7: The toadstool deals an extra 2d10 poison damage on attacks, it gains resistance to all damage from piercing, slashing, & bludgeoning damage from nonmagical attacks, and it can release an extra 2 boomshrooms.

8+: The toadstool deals an extra 3d10 poison damage on attacks, it gains immunity to all damage from piercing, slashing, & bludgeoning damage from nonmagical attacks, resistance to all damage from piercing, slashing, & bludgeoning damage from magical attacks, and it can release an extra 3 boomshrooms.

Each sporecap has 10 hit points. How would this ability effect the final challenge rating? Please help!

How is Challenge Rating (CR) calculated for a mixed group of multiple monsters in regards to the Treasure Table?

I understand that encounters are balanced around exp thresholds in the DMG (e.g. https://rpg.stackexchange.com/a/105360).

With that said, there are loot tables in the DMG 136-139 that have “Challenge Rating” ranges for how loot should be distributed.

I understand CR is not supposed to be summed or multiplied, but if the party kills 20 CR 3 monsters, in the loot table, what would the challenge rating range be for these monetary loots?

As a tangential note: the DMG item loot tables don’t really explain which table to use “A vs B vs J, vs K…”.

What challenge rating should the Ebondeath stat block have been given?

In the adventure Divine Contention, there’s a creature called Ebondeath, and the adventure provides a stat block for this creature, available on D&DBeyond.

This creature’s stat block appears to be a modified version of the Ghost’s stat block. The Ghost is a CR 4 creature. Ebondeath has also been given a CR of 4, but it has:

This looks like a mistake to me, and given that some traits have been updated where others have not been, it also looks like a lazy effort without paying much attention to the details.

Ebondeath is clearly stronger than a Ghost, and therefore surely must be of a higher CR that 4. What CR should1 this stat block have been given? As a bonus question, what else should be updated to make things more consistent with the CR it should have been given (meaning the Withering Touch attack, and should the save DC of Horrifying Visage be 20 as well)?

1. Note that by “should”, I mean if it were to be derived from its stat block, not just an opinion (the word “should” often has that association, so I just wanted to make that clear).

How does a dragon gain Challenge Rating & thereby increase their spell power?

According to the spell casting variant suggested in the Monster Manual in the True Dragon section, dragons gain a number of spells based on their charisma and their maximum level is based off of 1/3rd of their Challenge Rating. Here is a table that sums it up.

Assuming a dragon reverse extrapolated and is aware of this variant for draconic spell casting, they would seek to gain greater CR in order to cast the better spells. Take an Ancient Greens with CR 22, she needs a few more CR ‘points’ so as to gain Clone or Mighty Fortress.

Note: ALL the questions below revolve around True Dragons gaining increased Challenge Rating. If i require a separate StackExchange question for each, please let me know!

  • Does a dragon existing-residing ‘in lair’ gain CR? Does their maximum spell level ‘drop’ the moment they leave?

  • Does a leading dragon gain CR based on the number and quality of her servants, minions, slaves, toadies, &/or henchpersons (or ‘livestock-property’ in the case of Green dragons)? Would this also increase based on magic items, traps or well-defended real estate (such as castles on mountains – they have a lot of hit points and good armour class, making a dragon MUCH tougher).

  • If any True dragon becomes a Shadow dragon, how much does it gain in Challenge Rating? Why?

  • Does a vast &/or terrifying amount of knowledge equate to CR? It would mean better tactics, strategy &/or knowing weaknesses of friends and foe alike. Does a vast amount of intelligence infrastructure (i.e. ‘a powerful spy network & strike force’) equate threat and danger and thus increase CR?

  • Would gaining the spell power of an arch-mage (CR 12) add to her high-ranking CR? If so, how much?

Most dragons would want at least CR 24 for 8th level spells at the very least. Getting CR 27 would allow for the real game-changer spells like True Polymorph and Wish.

Long story short: Assuming a dragon figured out that CR = Spell power, how would such a being best gain Challenge Rating?

Do the high-fashion armour clothings from Run & Gun that are tagged as ‘Newest Models’ lose armour rating over time?

Relevant rules snippets from Run & Gun, p. 59:

NEWEST MODEL

These items are the most recent incarnations of their corporate creators. That means they lose a little more when purchased as Lightly Worn, namely a 20 percent loss of Armor Rating (round adjusted Rating up) when buying older models of the clothes.

LIGHTLY WORN

The Lightly Worn option provides runners with a chance to buy some primo gear at a discount rate, with a few catches. Buying from the Lightly Worn section requires the character to have Armand as a contact with a Loyalty of at least 2. When gear is purchased Lightly Worn, the character gets a price discount of 25 percent, but they only get the Armor rating; they do not get any of the Features of the armor. The Lightly Worn feature can be bought off by having the piece of Armor refit. This requires an Armorer + Logic [Mental] (10, 1 hour) Extended Test and costs 10 percent of the original armor cost for each Feature the character is trying to have restored.

Do I need to refit a Newest Model every so often to avoid having it degrade into Lightly Worn and lose 20% of its armour rating? Or is Newest Model only meant to imply that purchasing the used version gets you an older model that isn’t as good, and applies the -20% armour rating in addition to Lightly Worn’s lack of armour features?

What should the rarity rating be for this homebrew Healing Brick?

I read about this item on reddit (with a different name) a while ago and planned to implement this in my campaign, but I’m unsure what its rarity should be.

Healing Brick

As an action, make either melee or ranged attack roll against target. It is treated as improvised weapon (1d4+STR dmg) with 20/60 range. On a hit, target is healed by 2d4+2 HP, then takes the damage from the attack. On a hit or a miss, the brick loses its magic.

The main thing I’m concerned about is being able to wake knocked out allies from afar, without exposing the user to danger.

Should this item be common like a Healing Potion? Or it should have a higher rarity?