Can a readied range attack provoke an attack from the intended target?

Pathfinder 1e rules question…

A and B are medium sized creatures. A is a ranged character, B is a melee character.

Lets say A readies a ranged attack at anyone that comes into visibility. No enemies are visible nor within range at the moment.

Lets say B (an enemy of A) appears to A as part of their move + attack turn. B appears by moving adjacent to A — perhaps because B is in fog/stinking cloud and comes within 5 feet, or perhaps the room is in darkness and A only has a candle illuminating 5 feet.

So A gets to use their readied action — they see B, and they shoot (with appropriate miss chances and such). Does B get an AOO in addition to their planned attack?

I would guess that no, B does not get an AOO, for at least 1 of 2 reasons:

  • B becomes visible to A as B is entering the adjacent square, and thus I believe A’s attack would interrupt B’s movement and B is technically not in melee range when the ranged attack is made.

  • I’m not even sure you can make an attack of opportunity when it is your turn, or, if you can AoO when you are triggering the readied action on your turn. (Can B even take AoOs on their turn in PF1e?)

There is a similar question for 4e supporting my guess, but I’m not familiar with 4e and am unaware of the rules differences. That question is here: If a readied ranged attack action is used against the appearance of a burrowing creature, does the attack provoke an attack of opportunity?

However, I couldn’t find a discussion/ruling for PF1e — either my google skills failed me or it hasn’t been asked.

help with readied action

we play on fantasy grounds and each round we roll a new initiative each turn to make it more random. my question is the fighter readys to attack the creature when it moves into his range. the creature moves but doesnt reach the fighter. next turn we roll initiative and the creature goes first. he moves into range and the fighter uses his action from the last round for his readied action, which is a reaction, now the creature goes and attacks the fighter. now its the fighter turn to go again? since the first attack was a reaction from the previous round. Does the fight go as normal and attack twice in the round and get his reaction back since he now had his turn?

How does Blink work versus a readied action in this PvP scenario?

Bit of an odd one but I want rulings for this scenario:


Yes this is PVP and it ending up been fun at the table, and no one was upset.


Playing a Level 7 college of sword Bard with a Homemade Magic item that gives me access to the Blink Spell.

Fighting a Level 7 Paladin who is a new party member and wants to test their skills.

We are sparing with each other, the goal is first to score three hits or to KO the opponent.

During the fight, the Bard casts Blink, ends their turn, the roll is lucky – he gets a 15 and enters the ethereal plane.

The Paladin not knowing what to do ready’s an action to attack when they reappear.

On the Bards turn, the Bard reeappears and attacks. The Bard is a dual-wielder and has multi-attack.

The DM rules that the Bard gets their first attack, then the Paladin gets their ready action to attack back. After that, the Bard can then take their second attack, and then their bonus attack, if they wish.

Note that the Paladin had cast a spell a few turns ago that on their next hit the target has to pass a Wis-save or become frightened of them – I can’t remember the spell or ability

The first attack by the Bard is a miss.

The Paladin hits back and misses as well.

The Paladin uses a second Attack which the DM allows them before the Bard gets theirs and hits, the Bard fails their save-throw, is now frightened and at disadvantage.

The Bards second attack misses at disadvantage.

The Bards off-hand-attack misses at disadvantage.

The Bard rolls their blink, but the roll is low, so they stay.

The Paladin takes two attacks and both hit, accumulating three hits and is declared the winner.

We laugh and move on.

I think it should have gone different. The Bard should have been able to use all three of their attacks before the Paladin got any, and the Paladin should have only been able to attack once – Since a second attack should have only have been on their turn.

It might have made no difference, but the attacks could still have missed. I felt that the bard, who used a smart tactic of Blink – using their speed over the Paladins strength, was punished by the DM.

Did my Dm make a correct ruling?

In case a trigger for a readied action is someone else’s reaction, what is resolved first?

I asked this question. The answer is YES.

But I’m still not sure – in such a case (i.e. a trigger for reaction being another reaction) – which reaction is resolved first, the triggered one or the triggering one?

Does the readied action interrupt someone else’s reaction that triggered it? Is there a possibility of a chain of such consecutively triggering and consecutively interrupted reactions?

How should I be handling readied actions and turn order?

The monster my players were fighting acted first in the intitative order. It dove into the lake and out of sight. They all readied actions to attack when it revealed itself. On its next turn it attacked, triggering all of their readied actions, so it got off its attack, but then they all attacked him. We all got really confused as to whose turn it now was, the monster again or my players. I ruled that it was the monster but now that seems wrong. Did I rule this correctly? How should I be handling this?

With Crossbow Expert feat – can you Bonus Action attack on your turn, and then use a readied action to attack on someone else’s turn?

I am playing a crossbow expert ranged rogue and trying to maximize my sneak attack capabilities in order to remain competitive with regard to DPR (Paladin and Fighter in the group).

I am wondering if by RAW, I can use the bonus action attack provided by this feat first and then if it is successful, ready my regular attack to trigger on someone else’s turn – essentially allowing me a chance at two sneak attacks within the round.

I am solo-classed, so I don’t have access to Extra attack and not looking to abuse Haste. I am wondering if this is in DM-rule territory or if there is some source I can point to that would allow something like this?

Can a player use both a readied action and an immediate action?

Character A readies an action to counter a spell if Enemy Wizard casts a spell

Character A is then attacked by Enemy Rogue, and uses an immediate action (like Windy Escape, or in this example, Emergency Force Sphere) to avoid being hit.

Enemy Wizard was also secretly holding a readied action for if Character A was to cast a spell, as Enemy Wizard knows Character A is also a caster.

So: Character A readies an action to dispel Enemy Wizard if he casts spell > Enemy Rogue attacks Character A> Character A immediate action Emergency Force Sphere> Enemy Wizard’s readied action dispel Character A if he casts a spell goes off on Emergency Force Sphere > Character A’s readied action dispel Enemy Wizard if he casts a spellgoes off on Enemy Wizard’s dispel

DM Ruling: Character A can’t use his readied action to dispel Enemy Wizard’s dispel of Character A’s immediate action because a readied action is an immediate action, per:

Immediate Reaction: A readied action is an immediate reaction. It takes place after your enemy completes the action that triggers it. Interrupting an Enemy: If you want to use a readied action to attack before an enemy attacks, you should ready your action in response to the enemy’s movement.

Is this correct? Or what should actually happen here?

Can a caster use a readied spell to counterspell a lower (less potent) version of the same spell?


I have a scenario that will likely never happen, but I am curious in how it would work.

First, the preliminary, Combining Magical Effects:

The effects of different spells add together while the durations of those spells overlap. The effects of the same spell cast multiple times don’t combine, however. Instead, the most potent effect — such as the highest bonus — from those castings applies while their durations overlap, or the most recent effect applies if the castings are equally potent and their durations overlap.

Now the setup:

Bob the 3nd-level Generic Wizard and Doug the 3rd-level Earth Wizard face off. Bob knows Doug’s favorite tactic and readies a spell. Doug casts Earth Tremor under Bob. The spell say, "You cause a tremor in the ground within range. Each creature other than you in that area must make a Dexterity saving throw."

But Bob was ready and casts Earth Tremor as a 2nd-level spell for his reaction making it more potent (more damage) in the same area.

So what happens?

Doug’s casting means Doug is not targeted by the tremor. But as a reaction Bob casts a more powerful version where Bob is not targeted by the spell. So does that overpower Doug’s spell? And if so, does that mean Bob no longer has to make a Dexterity save and Doug does?

There may be other spells that do this but Earth Tremor was the first I found with wording stating that regardless of the target point, the caster is not affected.

Do you lose concentration on a Readied spell when you use your reaction for something else?

The War Wizard gets the Durable Magic feature at 10th level which states:

[…] While you maintain concentration on a spell, you have a +2 bonus to AC and all saving throws.

The Ready action states:

[…] When the trigger occurs, you can either take your reaction right after the trigger finishes or ignore the trigger. Remember that you can take only one reaction per round.

When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, which you release with your reaction when the trigger occurs. To be readied, a spell must have a casting time of 1 action, and holding onto the spell’s magic requires concentration. If your concentration is broken, the spell dissipates without taking effect. […]

Thus a War Wizard with a Readied spell would gain bonuses to their AC and saving throws. But what happens if the Wizard chooses to make an opportunity attack or use their reaction on something else? Do they maintain concentration on fire-bolt or do they drop concentration; Do they continue to benefit from Durable Magic or not?


The only thing I was able to find was that the Sage Advice Compendium document (pdf link) states the following (emphasis mine):

Q. I have a readied action. Can I stop readying to take an opportunity attack? Or is ready a full turn commitment?

A. If you have an action readied, you can make an opportunity attack, which causes you to stop readying.

Notably, this only addresses opportunity attacks and doesn’t give any justification, so part of my question is this: Is there support for the conclusion made in the Sage Advice Compendium anywhere in the rulebooks themselves?