How useful is the 5e ‘Wish’ spell (‘Basic Use’ version) for spell research?

The 5e Wish spell does, literally, whatever you wish, but for a price. The Basic Use version may be useful for instant spell research without the usual time / gold costs. Logically, one could use this Basic Wish to learn all the wizard spells lvl. 8 and lower. But what are the limits? To quote:

The basic use of this spell is to duplicate any other spell of 8th level or lower. You don’t need to meet any requirements in that spell, including costly Components. The spell simply takes effect.

Here are some possibilities:

  1. Casting ‘Wish’ may allow one to have a version of any existing / official spell (found in Player’s Handbook, Volo’s &/or Mordenkainen’s manuals). This exists as a memorized spell ‘slot’, uncast, in one’s mind. Wizards (class) could then write-scribe this spell, providing this was a wizard’s (spell-list) spell in the first place. This learning technique may also extend to some ritual spells, q.v.

  2. As the Basic Use of a ‘Wish’ spell does NOT require material components. As such, the caster of this spell can automatically gain one (1) fully transcribed non-magical version in a book (or scroll / carved tablet / scribed on a skull / whatever suits your fancy). Should this be a ‘wizard’ spell, the caster could then use this written version as though they had transcribed this themselves. Other wizards would need to endure the usual transcription-study-cost process from this origin material, as normal.

  3. This Basic Version of the spell vetoes any and all requirements! As such, any spell imaginable (of less than 8th level value) can be instantly scribed into a book. If it were considered a ‘wizard’ type spell others of that class could make use / transcribe it as usual. If it were a spell for any other list, those of the appropriate class could use this written spell to re-establish a new relationship with their deity, patron or other spell-delivery creature.

Off the cuff, the first one seems reasonable. The second version seems to be pushing boundaries a little (not sure why). The last one, drafting out Brand New Spells every day, seems totally implausible for a mere Basic Wish (perhaps a FULL wish could do this?) – yet i have no known RAW defence on this. It just seems like a bad idea to let a CR 11 ‘arch-mage’ pump out 300+ spells (of any class / up to 8th lvl) in any given year, risk free. But… why not?

Gathered Exchangers of Stackings… what say ye?

What are some advanced background topics I’ll need for distributed systems and networks research?

I am a new graduate student in Computer Science who would like to be able to read and understand modern and new distributed systems research papers. My current background / courses and understanding is in the level of undergraduate and beginner graduate level courses in:

  • Networks (TCP/IP stack and applications)
  • Distributed Systems (Graduate level course with Time (logical/vector clocks), 2PC and 3PC, Multicast and membership, election, Consistency , Consensus and Quorums (Paxos), DHTs and Overlays and some modern applications like ZooKeeper etc)
  • Undergraduate Algorithms, Discrete Mathematics and Theory of Computation (basic DFA/NFA and intro to Turing Machines with no rigorous mathematics)

However, I find this background insufficient to read modern research in networks and distributed systems and in particular, I am not aware of modern protocols like QUIC and the formal methods mentioned in the papers which I believe include some sort of model checking and the likes. Also many of the topics I have mentioned above in distributed systems – I lack the background to verify and prove correctness of these protocols and even follow the proofs that they have given.

Any suggestions on a reading list that can prepare me to be in a position to understand modern research in this area would be very helpful.

How are scientific research projects planned? In particular computer science, but possibly there exists processes for all research?

Possibly some context: Take any research endeavor. Finding a vaccine. Going to the moon. Clean energy. I don’t have a background in these scientific areas so picking one closer to home (Comp Sci) might be better. But the idea is how to battle the Unknowns? How to do it economically? How to make progress while not getting analysis paralysis?

Some might suggest a scrum, or an agile process try to solve these questions. I’m not certain that they address the same level or kinds of Unknowns.

Are there previous experiences that work, and those that don’t work? And why? The questions grows on the way forward through unknowns, and by definition the Unknown doesn’t exactly have a road map, and new context is developed regularly.

This maybe simply the question of the ‘meta’ variety: Is there research on comp sci research? If so does Comp Sci research have approaches or techniques that they rely on?

counting keywords of a research paper

While solving a research article I didn’t understand the following statement: “The number of keywords in study 1 was between 10 and 20, while in Study 2, it was between 100 and 1000”.

How can I find keywords of study 2 which are between 100 and 1000 where the keywords given in study 2 are: Non-Functional Requirements, Automatic Classification, Support Vector Machine

kindly help me on early basis. thanks

Recent research on custom hardware to break RSA-1024

In 2003, Adi Shamir and Eran Tromer proposed an ASIC device called TWIRL, which should be able to sieve RSA-1024 using the General Number Field Sieve during a year, “only” using 10-20M$ of investment including NRE and power costs. Now, 17 years later, the cost of such a device should be exponentially lower. Has any research concerning custom ASIC cracking been done for RSA-1024?

Can a Warlock research Original spells?

The Dungeon Master’s Guide (Page 198) details how to create your own custom spells by doing in-universe research. It states that “A spellcaster of any kind can create a new spell”. Whether a Warlock is even a spellcaster is already arguable. They don’t technically cast spells, they have invocations. However, they do have caster levels. Meaning that they are, perhaps, spellcasters without spells.

My question: Does a Warlock qualify for researching new spells? And if yes-… Can they actually learn their own spells as an invocation? Or have they made a ‘spell’ that they can therefore never use?

If there is any research on Goal Based Programming (GBP)?

The more I think about programming and optimization, the more I think “why not just specify a goal and have the program figure out the optimal solution to it”.

I am familiar with basic “optimization problems” such as finding the best fit line to a curve, or gradient descent sorts of things. What I’m talking about is way more complicated than that.

What I’m imagining is to say something like “An HTTPS server exists”, and for the system to figure out how to build one. Obviously given just that info, it’s not enough. It would require human-level training in programming and understanding concepts and everything.

But my question is, what could you do to build a system to support such a “goal statement”? What would the key parts be?

It seems at first, the simplest goal is “Action x is performed”. This is required to change the current world into the desired (goal) world. For example, "Add" is performed on 1 and 2 is a goal stating that the “add” function is applied to the two arguments. It seems that from this foundation, you can build up higher and higher levels of abstraction to the point where you could then say “An HTTPS server exists”. But this HTTPS server is a structure, not an action. So you need some way to have some intermediate goals that transcribe goals into (not actions, but) structures. Perhaps, The result of x operation exists is a simple transformation between the two.

But then I’m stuck haha. What do the goals look like in the intermediate realm? Has anyone done any research into this area? Searching doesn’t yield much, though it brings up a book Goal programming and extensions which I might have to purchase.