How to integrate scientific resources in user research?

I am about to conduct my first user interviews in order to find out why and how musicians are collaborating in music production with digital audio workstations.

Having found several resources that seem to give answers to the first question of why people are collaborating in creative processes, I am now wondering how I should be integrating these insights into the research and whether I should be asking this question at all. Can I expect something new and valuable from asking questions of which I feel like I already know the answer to?

Appropriate research method to understand the target audience

I need to make a mobile app where the client described the problem, why they need the app, the idea about it, but nothing more. I already understand what kind of features it should contain to solve the problems that the end user experiences without the app (from my experience), but keeping in mind the point, that we need to understand the target user, what would be the best method for this if I can’t get to the users? How can I gather this information, so I can validate my assumptions?

Strategy for effective vulnerability research

I have been working on exploit development, and reverse engineering for a few months approx 1 year , and 2-month full time, but I have some doubts after gaining solid knowledge. I want to ask non-technical questions. for example, I am at the main function of adobe reader dc or Foxit, but what next? there are many blocks, and it is easy to get lost over it, and we won't reverse engineering all the product because it is endless, So the question is. how can one find vulnerabilities path or reverse specific blocks? I was thinking about fuzzing and only reverse the crash blocks, but the time I am waiting for a crash. I can use it for doing another kind of analysis. what would you recommend to me? I have been using tools so far like boofuzz, peachfuzz, and I have been using a bit winafl + dynamorio, google sanitizers, libfuzzer, and other tools.

Competitive research: How to use the collected information

When making competitive research, I find similar websites, competitors and see how they achieve something compared to what I need. When I get this information from many websites, how later I can use the information I noticed? How can I validate, that regarding these other sites I need to do something just like they did?

Competitive research: How to use the collected information

When making competitive research, I find similar websites, competitors and see how they achieve something compared to what I need. When I get this information from many websites, how later I can use the information I noticed? How can I validate, that regarding these other sites I need to do something just like they did?

Competitive research: How to use the collected information

When making competitive research, I find similar websites, competitors and see how they achieve something compared to what I need. When I get this information from many websites, how later I can use the information I noticed? How can I validate, that regarding these other sites I need to do something just like they did?

Best way to organize data gathered during research?

What is the best and most scientific way to organize all the qualtative data gathered during research? I think this is important because with easy to understand research and data, it will be difficult to create accurate personas and user scenarios. I started using affinity diagraming to organize data gathered during user research, but I was wondering if anyone else had any other ideas. I feel that another scientific approach would really he helpful.

For example, I may have pages and pages of word and excel docs filled with research data. What is the best way to organize this so it actually makes meaningful sense?

User Research Insights Database

at our company, we are struggling to document all the insights that we gain through user research and make them accessible and easy to find for everyone inside of the company. The perfect solution for us would be:

  • option to enter tags
  • search function
  • option to include media (images, prototypes or videos)
  • having a tool in which we list all the observations during user tests (often times some of the observations that we normally write in PostIt’s are not digitalized, because they are not relevant at that moment)

How are you solving this issue in your company? Any best practices? Do you maybe know a good tool that could serve here as a solution?

Thanks in advance.

How long do user research studies tend to take when the participant needs a translator?

My team is running several user research studies on a mostly internal product with both English-speaking and non-English-speaking users. The studies are written in English.

One is a quantitative Google Forms survey with multiple choice questions. This has taken most English-speaking users 15-20 minutes to complete (internal pilot with self-reported completion time). The other is a qualitative benchmark usability study using UserTesting. This has taken English-speaking participants 15-25 minutes to complete.

Making the following assumptions:

  1. The translators are familiar with the users’ domain, but not familiar with user research. (No one on our team speaks the natural languages that these users speak.)
  2. All of the studies take place remotely, not onsite. The non-English-speaking users are in different countries from us.
  3. Due to time zone differences, our team is not available to assist the participants.
  4. The product is translated into the users’ languages and has the same features and a consistent layout with the English version.

How long should we tell the participants that these studies will take? Is there any research that compares how long English-speaking participants take vs. participants requiring an English translation?