Can a character rest while under the Etherealness spell?

Etherealness lasts for 8 hours and doesn’t require concentration:

You step into the border regions of the Ethereal Plane, in the area where it overlaps with your current plane. You remain in the Border Ethereal for the Duration or until you use your action to dismiss the spell…

A Short Rest is:

… a period of downtime, at least 1 hour long, during which a character does nothing more strenuous than eating, drinking, reading, and tending to wounds.

Meanwhile a Long Rest is:

…a period of extended downtime, at least 8 hours long, during which a character sleeps for at least 6 hours and performs no more than 2 hours of light activity, such as reading, talking, eating, or standing watch.

If I did nothing for an hour while on the Ethereal Plane, could that count as a short rest? Likewise, if I did nothing for the full 8 hours, would that count as a long rest?

Alternatives to rest for restoration of spell slots

Is there a mechanism (established in the rules) for restoring the spell slots of an arcane caster (particularly interested in Wizard) that does not involve rest?

The method must be external to the caster (e.g. a potion or an artifact), and cannot require the caster to have chosen specific skills or class abilities.

As a footnote, I am willing to consider divine intervention, but that is akin to me just making up a DM ruling to get the job done. I need this effect for a story element at the end of a campaign, and would like to keep it legitimate in the context of what is going on.

How to register meta field with checkbox to REST API with default value true?

I have a meta field with checkbox, it has by default checked value, but when I register it to REST API my checkbox become unchecked.

How can I get it checked by default?

Here is my code for metabox:

function modest_gutenberg_meta_add_meta_box() {     $  post_types = array('post', 'page', 'modest_portfolio');     foreach ($  post_types as $  post_type) {         add_meta_box(              'modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_option',              esc_html__( 'Title Options', 'modest-gutenberg-meta' ),              'modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_settings',              $  post_type,              'normal',              'high',              array('__back_compat_meta_box' => true));     } }  add_action( 'add_meta_boxes', 'modest_gutenberg_meta_add_meta_box' );  function modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_settings($  post) {     $  visibility_title = get_post_meta($  post->ID, '_modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility', true);     $  checked_title = 'checked';     if($  visibility_title == 'unchecked' && !empty($  visibility_title)) {            $  checked_title = '';     }      wp_nonce_field( 'modest_gutenberg_meta_update_post_title_settings', 'modest_gutenberg_meta_update_post_title_nonce' );     ?>          <input type="checkbox" name="modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility_field" id="modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility_field" value="1" <?php echo $  checked_title; ?> />             <label for="modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility_field"><?php esc_html_e( 'Display Title', 'modest-gutenberg-meta' ); ?></label>      <?php }  function modest_gutenberg_meta_save_post_title_settings($  post_id, $  post) {      $  edit_cap = get_post_type_object( $  post->post_type )->cap->edit_post;     if( !current_user_can( $  edit_cap, $  post_id )) {         return;     }     if( !isset( $  _POST['modest_gutenberg_meta_update_post_title_nonce']) || !wp_verify_nonce( $  _POST['modest_gutenberg_meta_update_post_title_nonce'], 'modest_gutenberg_meta_update_post_title_settings' )) {         return;     }     if(defined('DOING_AUTOSAVE') && DOING_AUTOSAVE) {         return;     }      if(array_key_exists('modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility_field', $  _POST)) {         update_post_meta(              $  post_id,              '_modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility',              sanitize_text_field($  _POST['modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility_field'])         );     } else {         update_post_meta(              $  post_id,              '_modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility', 'unchecked');     } } 

And then I register_meta:

function modest_gutenberg_meta_register_meta() {     //title     register_meta( 'post', '_modest_gutenberg_meta_post_title_visibility', array(         'show_in_rest' => true,         'type' => 'boolean',         'single' => true,         'sanitize_callback' => 'sanitize_text_field',         'auth_callback' => function() {             return current_user_can( 'edit_posts' );         }     ) ); }  add_action('init', 'modest_gutenberg_meta_register_meta'); 

I’m registering meta for Gutenberg Plugin to add a new Sidebar, there I have ToggleControl, which make my meta update and it’s working.

But I can’t understand what am I doing wrong with default value?

How can I get my value checked by default inside WordPress REST API?

If I delete register_meta() function and switch inside add_meta_box() __back_compat_meta_box to false and refresh the page which I’m editing,

I will get my checkbox true and then if I register_meta() again and refresh page I will get my meta in REST API checked.

Sorry for my English, hope someone can help me)

Thanks in advance.

In Eberron: Rising from the Last War, can Warforged become exhausted if they decide not to take a long rest?

In “Eberron: Rising from the Last War” under “Constructed Resilience”, it states the following as a bonus:

You don’t need to sleep, and magic can’t put you to sleep.

and it goes on to say

Sentry’s Rest. When you take a Long Rest, you must spend at least six hours in an inactive, motionless state, rather than sleeping. In this state, you appear inert, but it doesn’t render you Unconscious, and you can see and hear as normal.

Now, what I’ve noticed that has changed from “Wayfinder’s Guide to Eberron” it read

Warforged Resilience … You don’t need to sleep and don’t suffer the effects of exhaustion due to lack of rest, and magic can’t put you to sleep.”

So, in this approved version of warforged, if this living construct refused to take a long rest, would it suffer exhaustion that a normal humanoid of the flesh would likely take, or would it be safe from this kind of treatment?

Can you be in a perpetual state of short/long rest?

Based on this question: Does the Aspect of the Moon Eldritch Invocation effectively allow for unending Wild Shape?

In that question the OP is wanting to know if they could keep regaining use of wildshape to stay in wildshape for a week of downtime. Perpetual state of resting to me means that each hour of downtime would count as the end of a short rest or each 8 hours spent in downtime as the end of a long rest.

Is it possible to be in a perpetual state of short/long rest whether during downtime or not for the purpose of regaining class/racial features?

In other words: Can a PC use 16 short rests then an 8 hour long rest each day and continuously regain features that replenish on short rests?

What triggers the benefit of the bard’s “Song of Rest” feature?

In D&D 5e, the benefit of the Bard’s “Song of Rest” feature triggers “if you or any friendly creatures who can hear your performance regain hit points at the end of the the short rest.”

Does Song of Rest’s benefit apply just when spending hit dice to regain hit points?
Or does it apply to any other way that a player might regain hit points at the end of a short rest (e.g. by casting a spell, using a Second Wind, eating a Goodberry, etc.)?

Does Beacon of Hope cast during the last minute of a short rest maximize the healing received from rolling hit dice?

The spell Beacon of Hope lasts for one minute and states:

For the duration, each target … regains the maximum number of hit points possible from any healing.

If a party is taking a short rest, can the party Cleric cast this spell during the last minute of the rest to ensure that the party regains the maximum possible hit points on their hit dice rolls?

If casting the spell interrupts the rest for the Cleric, can they still use Beacon of Hope to maximize the hit dice healing for the rest of the party?

What are the repercussions of being able to finish a short rest in only 10 minutes instead of taking 1 hour?

Currently we are playing a horror adventure in D&D 5e. Due to circumstances (beings locked in a haunted house, rooms changing just when we close the doors, etc.), a 1-hour rest is hardly possible.

Our DM ruled that short rests can be as short as 10 minutes. The obvious result is that we can take it. What are other changes that we, both players and DM, should be aware of?

If it matters, party consists of Lore Bard, Vengeance Paladin, Chaos Sorcerer and Divination Wizard, all level 3.