How close can you get to enemies before having to roll stealth?

The following situation: 2 Members of the party try to sneak up on distracted enemies. The other two, not stealth proficient players want to stay 20 feet behind, not roll stealth and join after the others. The approach is fine by me, but I am really confused about how near they can get before being noticed. This is important because I need to know how long they will take to join the fight afterward.

If I had to guess, I would say there is a detection range, how far a creature can detect others. Is there any rule for that or does the DM have to arbitrarily decide every time? Also, how does the alertness of the detecting creature and the environment (i.e. reverberation in a dungeon) factor into this?

How should a player and GM handle an ability that necessitates a player seeing a GM’s roll?

A Dual-Cursed Oracle gets the following Revelation at 1st level:

Misfortune (Ex): At 1st level, as an immediate action, you can force a creature within 30 feet to reroll any one d20 roll that it has just made before the results of the roll are revealed. The creature must take the result of the reroll, even if it’s worse than the original roll. Once a creature has suffered from your misfortune, it cannot be the target of this revelation again for 1 day.

This can be used against any creature, including those the GM controls; indeed, that appears to be the intent of the ability, hence the name Misfortune. The problem is that in order for it to work on said creatures, the player needs to see the GM’s die roll, which to my knowledge is generally frowned upon, and see it whenever any enemy makes any save since Misfortune can potentially be activated at any time. Is there a better way to handle this?

Similar abilities include a Fate Cleric’s Tugging Strands, and a Nornkith’s Fate Weaver.

What do you roll to sleep in a hidden spot?

Scenario: a character is alone in the forest, and needs to sleep. Of course, they don’t want to get killed in their sleep, so they try to sleep in a hidden spot, like inside the treetops, heavily obscured by branches and leaves from all sides.

Question is, what do they roll for, if at all, since monsters are all but guaranteed to pass by during the night? Do they roll Stealth (assume the most obscured position), or Survival (find the best sleeping spot & camouflage it)?

Can a Circle of the Stars Druid roll a natural d3 (or other odd-sided die) to bias their Cosmic Omen roll?

The sixth level Circle of the Stars feature, Cosmic Omen, allows the druid to, for the remainder of a day, use their reaction to either help their allies or hinder their foes:

Whenever you finish a long rest, you can consult your Star Map for omens. When you do so, roll a die. Until you finish your next long rest, you gain access to a special reaction based on whether you rolled an even or an odd number on the die:

Weal (even). Whenever a creature you can see within 30 feet of you is about to make an attack roll, a saving throw, or an ability check, you can use your reaction to roll a d6 and add the number rolled to the total.

Woe (odd). Whenever a creature you can see within 30 feet of you is about to make an attack roll, a saving throw, or an ability check, you can use your reaction to roll a d6 and subtract the number rolled from the total.

Cosmic Omen, Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, pg. 38

Note, however, that in the description of this feature, the player is simply instructed to roll "a die", without qualifying what kind of die it has to be. This poses no issue for the "standard issue" dice used in 5e D&D, since the d4, d6, d8, d10, d12, and d20 all have an even number of sides, and therefore an [assumed, with fair dice] equal probability of rolling an even or odd number.

However, there are dice that have odd numbers of sides. In this situation, a player could pick up a three-sided die, for example, and they’d have a 2/3rds chance of rolling an odd number, biasing their feature towards hindering enemies.

Is there any rule in 5th Edition D&D that forbids a player from choosing to do this?

Can my Primal Companion roll initiative instead of my character?

In Tasha’s Primal Companion feature it doesn’t say that the beast doesn’t roll initiative, just that it acts during the player’s turn. Is that enough to mean that it’s the player that has to roll initiative?

I assume the answer is yes, but it would be nice if you were playing a strength build ranger, or to take advantage of the Primal Bond.

How many times do you roll damage for Chain Lighting?

Chain Lightning has the following description:

You create a bolt of lightning that arcs toward a target of your choice that you can see within range. Three bolts then leap from that target to as many as three other targets, each of which must be within 30 feet of the first target.

The rules for damage rolls state:

If a spell or other effect deals damage to more than one target at the same time, roll the damage once for all of them. For example, when a wizard casts fireball or a cleric casts flame strike, the spell’s damage is rolled once for all creatures caught in the blast.

Assuming four available targets which of the following is correct?

  • Roll once for damage for all of the targets
  • Roll twice for damage, once for the first target, and once for the three subsidiary targets.
  • Roll damage separately for each targets

On a D20 roll a +1 modifier equals +5%. What percentage would +1 add to 2D10, 3D10 and 4D10?

I have been reading about replacing the D20 in Dnd with 3D6.

One of the criticisms was that modifiers are exaggerated when you use 3D6, with some people saying a +1 modifier acts more like a +10% modifier.

What would be the percentage modifier of a +1 modifier on various numbers of D10 rolls and how would you calculate that?

Roll For Shoes – Does the advancement system work for longer campaigns?

I’m about to start in on a new campaign with the Roll For Shoes system, but I’m concerned that the characters will swiftly outstrip basic and intermediate challenges as they grow in dice.

In the title I mentioned "longer" campaigns. I’m defining "longer" as at least 72 hours of game time spread out over maybe 18 sessions, with hopes of room to grow.

Here is an example:

Ryan has Do Anything 1, and begins a life of roguishness. He starts breaking into houses and achieves Skulduggery 2, starts using lockpicks for Tools of the Trade 3, then eventually gets to Lockpicking 4 and maybe Safecracking 5.

Meanwhile, the GM needs to provide appropriate challenges for Ryan. When Ryan starts out, he somehow has to break into a house with one die. If he can manage that, the GM will later need to provide an appropriate challenge for Ryan’s 4-die Lockpicking skill.

From a story perspective the GM can always provide stronger locks and reasons, but by my very rough estimations getting a character to a four die skill could easily happen in a 4-hour session if the game is moving smoothly.

Does the RFS advancement system work for longer campaigns?

How many dice does the GM roll when challenging the players?

I’d like to run a game of Roll for Shoes, but I’m not sure how many dice I roll when the characters face various challenges.

I’m under the impression that it’s supposed to be the same number of dice the character uses, but that seems to make impossible tasks far too easy to perform.

Is there a general rule saying how many dice the GM rolls against a character’s attempt at a given task? Should the GM’s dice equal the character’s dice, or should the GM’s dice vary depending on the task’s difficulty?

How can I write a formula for this houseruled roll in AnyDice?

So here it goes:

  1. The roll is a pool of dice of d6s, d8s, and d10s. The minimum dice pool is 1d6 and the maximum dice pool is 10 dice. It could be 2d6 + 2d8 + 1d10, for example.
  2. Rolling 5+ is a success.
  3. A number of successes is necessary equal or higher than the Difficulty (that ranges from 1 to 10) to have a successful check.
  4. The maximum value of a die explodes: 6 in a d6, 8 in a d8, 10 in a d10. But there’s a limit by the character’s Protagonism (ranges 1 to 10). It’s like the level of the character, so one with Protagonism 3 could not explode any dice more than 3 times. The eventual 4th time counts only as a normal success, even if it has the maximum value again.

I see it can be very difficult to do this, so I thank anyone who may come up with something. Thanks so much!