Are there any poisons which reduce ability scores?

In D&D 5e, there are a number of poisons listed in the Dungeon Master’s Guide page 258. Most of these poisons deal poison damage or inflict conditions. I know that in Pathfinder there are many poisons which reduce ability scores, but I notice an absence of such poisons in this DMG list for D&D 5e. As a DM I’m considering introducing a wider variety of poisons, which also means considering a wider variety of effects.

Are there any examples of poisons in other D&D 5e materials which reduce ability scores?

When and why did the order of ability scores change in D&D?

In OD&D, the order in which abilities were presented and listed was: Strength, Intelligence, Wisdom, Constitution, Dexterity, Charisma. Today, the broadly accepted order is Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma. When did this generally accepted order change and are there any sources–or logical theories–indicating why the abilities were in that original order and why they changed?

How to extend Pathfinder point buy to scores below 7?

In Pathfinder point buy, ability scores of lower than 7 (before adjustments from race) may not be bought with point buy.

What would be a balanced price for such low ability scores?

I am looking for personal experience from people who have done such an extension, or for a reasonably accepted view in the character optimization community.

Motivation for the question: How likely is to roll elite array or better with 3d6 in order?

In particular, I am not worried about players creating horrible malformed monsters with only threes and eighteens as their ability scores.

The question Is it allowed to buy ability scores lower than 7? addresses whether buying low ability scores is allowed (no), which is not the question here. The answer also argues that allowing buying such scores is a bad idea. My use case is very different – I want to have a method of measuring how good or bad ability scores are, and allowing anyone to buy them is not an issue here.

Is it possible to turn a monster into a humanoid without giving them average physical ability scores?

Savage Species lists some rituals through which a creature can–in one example given–transform from an ogre into an elf.

If nothing else, it’s an interesting and evocative idea: a 6th level ogre barbarian who tires of racial prejudices and transforms into an elf. His RHD disappear, and he becomes a 6th-level elf barbarian. His lower effective level means he can no longer travel with ECL ~12 parties, but he decides to do it anyway. Heck, maybe he did it partly because he was tired of that +2 LA that Savage Species likes to pretend isn’t a big deal.

Unfortunately, losing all those hit dice is far from the worst thing that happens to him. Doing any of the book’s major rituals means his physical ability scores become, at best, 11/13/9. Considering his ogre-born mental scores aren’t picking up much slack either, this is pretty much unacceptable for a barbarian in all but either very silly or very gritty games.

Is there any printed way around this, or to compensate for this beyond things like wishing for inherent bonuses and equipping magic items (which any high level barbarian is going to get anyway, so the transformed elf barbarian still finishes with noticeably poor scores)?

Can a Way of Astral Self Monk use wisdom related scores for jumping?

I have several questions on the interactions between the Arms of Astral Self and the Jumping mechanics. According to the 3rd level feature, Arms of the Astral Self:

While the spectral arms are present, you gain the following benefits:

  • You can use your Wisdom modifier in place of your Strength modifier when making Strength checks and Strength saving throws.
  • You can use the spectral arms to make unarmed strikes.
  • When you make an unarmed strike with the arms on your turn, your reach for it is 5 feet greater than normal.
  • The unarmed strikes you make with the arms can use your Wisdom modifier in place of your Strength or Dexterity modifier for the attack and damage rolls, and their damage type is force.

The Jumping session of the PHB states:

Long Jump

When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing long jump, you can leap only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement.

This rule assumes that the height of your jump doesn’t matter, such as a jump across a stream or chasm. At your DM’s option, you must succeed on a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check to clear a low obstacle (no taller than a quarter of the jump’s distance), such as a hedge or low wall. Otherwise, you hit it.

High Jump

When you make a high jump, you leap into the air a number of feet equal to 3 + your Strength modifier (minimum of 0 feet) if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing high jump, you can jump only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement. In some circumstances, your DM might allow you to make a Strength (Athletics) check to jump higher than you normally can.

You can extend your arms half your height above yourself during the jump. Thus, you can reach above you a distance equal to the height of the jump plus 1½ times your height.

My questions would be, assuming that I have Arms of the Astral Self activated:

  1. Can I use my Wisdom Score instead of my strenght score to determine my long jump distance?
  2. Can I make a Wisdom (Athletics) check instead of a Strenght (Athletics) check?
  3. Can I use my Wisdom modifier instead of my Strenght modifier to determine my high jump’s height?
  4. Can the extra 5 feet range of the Arms of Astral Self be used when accounting for "extending your arms half your height above yourself" on the high jump, making it 1½ your height + 5 feet instead of only 1½ your height?

I am aware that some of the answers to these questions are up to DM discretion, so I would like to know, if possible, what would be the RAW interpretation and also how would you rule it in your games.

In advance, I’m extremely grateful to whoever takes time to answer these 🙂

Are the giant strength scores in the Monster Manual wrong?

The Storm Giant has a STR score of 29. According to the encumbrance rules that means the maximum weight a giant could lift is 435 lb. which really isn’t that much.

To put it in perspective. The Storm giant is 5x taller than a human, at the same proportion and thus has about 25x more mass. An average human male weighs around 180lb. A Storm Giant thus weighs around 4500 lb. So it’s impossible for one Storm Giant to carry another.

Another way of looking at it. A human-scale sword might be around 4ft. long and weigh 3 pounds. However, a sword that’s long enough for a Storm Giant would need to be around 20 ft. long and to maintain its own integrity would need to be about 2 inches thick at its centre and might be a foot wide. A sword like that would weight about 800 lb.

To even be able to wield a sword like that without being encumbered, the Storm Giant would need a minimum STR score of 160.

So in conclusion, Storm Giants must be about the weakest creatures in the Multi-verse on a pound for pound basis 😛

Am I missing some encumbrance rule somewhere that adjusts this based on creature size category?

CEO wants to terminate fifty developers (three developers each month with the interval of ten days) based on the lowest test scores

XYZ Soft is facing a big loss in the industry. Therefore, the company has started to offload its software developers. It started to conduct a test of hundred developers on daily basis and store their test scores in a data structure. After ten days, its CEO wants to terminate fifty developers (three developers each month with the interval of ten days) based on the lowest test scores.

Suppose you are working as a most senior developer in the company then which of the following data structure you will recommend to the CEO in the above given scenario.

  1. 1.  AVL Tree 
  2. 2.  Heap 

Justify your answer with solid reason.

Is a creature’s Innate Spellcasting save DC affected by changing ability scores or adding Spellcasting features from another creature?

I’m creating a Svirfneblin Evil Mage by combining the stat blocks for each Evil Mage and Svirfneblin.

A Svirfneblin’s Innate Spellcasting Save DC is 11 and its INT is +1. An Evil Mage’s Spellcasting Save DC is 13 and its INT is +3.

I’m taking the abilities from Evil Mage and Svirfneblin and taking the higher ability scores (and modifiers), does the increased INT modifier from the Evil Mage’s score affect the Innate Spellcasting spell save DC?