Should your font size change based on size and orientation of the device?

I am created a cross platform app and I was wondering if and when fonts should scale based on the size of the screen. Also, I was wondering if the scales of fonts should change based on the orientation of the device or on very large/very wide devices.

For example, I have one screen which has the text as the main subject of the screen. This font looks a bit odd on different devices when it doesn’t scale.

On buttons, however, the font looks fine without scaling.

Also, there are certain titles that look fine with rotations and others that look atrocious.

Are there any guidelines about which, if any bits of text, should scale and based on what (ppi, size of phone)? I know the common web standard is rem, but that doesn’t exist in mobile in certain cases (including mine).

How to explain to traditional people why they should upgrade their old Windows XP device?

This is an issue I’m recurringly facing: older people from my family (or people who my family members know) can be surprisingly reluctant to apply most basic security measures when they’re using they’re PCs. The particular issues vary, but this time I’m struggling with a really eggregious one: the refusal to upgrade from their ~20 years old Windows XP PC. (Or is this an even older version of Windows? I don’t really know as I did not see it yet.)

How can I explain that it is a bad idea nowadays to connect to the internet with such a PC?

I think that this question will only be clear and meaningful if I add an addendum about the mindset of such people… which seems to me to be really peculiar:

  • They seem to have no notion of obsolescence of things. In their minds, a computer is in good shape if and only if it is capable to perform the tasks they need it to perform (eg. “receive this important document sent to my e-mail address, make such-and-such modifications to this document, send it back“). Thus if they’re able to do this it is hard to explain to them they should buy a new PC.
  • They remember the times of poverty, when it was irresponsible (and actually plain stupid) to replace things carelessly. In their times broken things were being fixed if possible, and only replaced if repairs were no longer possible. Some of them are still poor, so they may have actual (rather than just mental) reasons to refuse to spend a three digit sum on new things.
  • They seem reluctant to understand how to operate stuff from the modern era. They seem to want a concise, clearly defined order of steps necessary to perform a task (rather than understanding of the abstractions of modern GUIs so that they can operate their PCs regardless of whatever it shows them). If anything strays from this clear order of steps (eg the computer shows them an unexpected dialog) they get confused and may deem their computer “broken” (and call me to “fix” it for them).
    • Actual example: “I don’t know what happens, why can I not get to my e-mail inbox without all of this annoying stuff? It keeps displaying me these annoying messages about passwords and phone numbers! Please fix it for me so that clicking this picture will get me to my e-mail inbox!”
    • As a result, whenever anything changes in their computer (eg this WinXP is upgraded finally…) that interferes with their well-known, predictable order of steps / responses from their PC it is likely they’ll say I “broke more than I fixed”. They have a clear definition of “fixing” their PC… “make it behave exactly as it used to“.
  • When told about security (eg that a middle school kiddie next door could break into their PC) they tend to respond along the lines of “Am I working in a three letter agency?” or “Who am I, a millionaire? There’s no reason anyone would want to target me!

Actually, if I think about it, their point of view, even if fallacious, kind of makes sense… They simply treat a PC as a tool like that they’re accustomed of, something like a hammer or a (traditional, simple, devoid of electronics) vacuum cleaner… Their approach, listed above, seems reasonable if they were talking about a hammer rather than a PC, I guess…

I’m running out of arguments. In the spirit of this question, may I ask how to talk to such old-timers?

How should I handle a player attacking from the top of a tree?

There is a player in my group whose character is developed around staying in trees, climbling, Athletics, Acrobatics, and such. He likes to climb trees and then leap down onto enemies from the tree branch in the beginning, but how should this be properly handled?

According to rules, he should take fall damage for falling off 10+ feet onto an enemy, but I consider the fact he is skilled in doing this as per his background.

There is no actual skill that he has that says he would nullify fall damage or instead apply it to the enemy, or that he should gain any benefit from this action.

Should I simply give him advantage on the attack roll, ignore fall damage, and call it a day?

When choosing payment options during checkout, should the Paypal option go directly to Paypal, or show a “continue to Paypal” link?

I currently have 2 payment options during checkout: Credit Card and Paypal. Currently, clicking on the Credit Card option will reveal a credit card form, and clicking on the Paypal option will take the user to Paypal checkout (on the Paypal site).

I have also seen it where sites such as Netflix, will show a “continue to paypal” link after selecting the Paypal payment method, instead of going straight to Paypal (shown below)

Payment Options

Paypal option selected

Is the “continue to paypal” link helpful to the user, or does it just add an extra step/confusion (because the user isn’t taken straight to Paypal after selecting the Paypal option)?

What should my database design look like if I want to implement an invoice preset?

I just finished creating the invoice part of my database and now I need to implement an invoice preset feature wherein it basically takes different products and services, both main and sub and puts them into an invoice with one click of a button through the client’s app.

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I do have a couple of questions with this design:

  1. Is the current design enough?
  2. I had some trouble with figuring out how do I recreate an invoice exactly how it was made (wherein the items are listed in the proper order) so a db admin from another website suggested I use a timestamp on the invoice items so I could keep track. Was that correct?
  3. I’ve created some mockup designs of the invoice preset (yellow and blue) but couldn’t decide which one is correct or if both of them are wrong.

Should colons be styled in the same way as the preceding label is?

Is it common for designers to style a colon in the same way as the preceding label, even though the following text does not follow this style?

For instance, I have the habit of making the colon bold if the label is bold as well.

Bold: the colon is bold, as is “Bold”, but the text following isn’t.

But when italicizing, I often do not make the colon italic (for no apparent reason, simply a habit)

Italic: the colon isn’t in italics, just like the text following.

However, I think it’s best to adopt an identical approach for each case. Also, in webdesign this might be crucial to provide a semantically valid HTML structure. Would one write markup like so:

<p><span class="bold">Bold:</span> the colon is bold, as is "Bold", but the text following isn't.</p> 

Or like so?

<p><span class="bold">Bold</span>: the colon is not bold and neither is the text following it, but "Bold" is.</p> 

Should we allow email invitations sent to an email address to be used with another?

Let’s say I have a SaaS platform, like a B2B platform where there are company accounts.

In this platform users can invite other users to join the company account by sending them an invitation link in an email with a secure token (à la Google Drive or GitHub).

Should we then let the invited user subscribe using a different email from the one where they received the invitation ?

That question regards primarily UX experience, although some security concerns might also be raised (I couldn’t find a more appropriate site for that kind of questions).