How might one permanently change the key ability for a specific skill from a mental to physical stat?

How might one permanently change the key ability for a specific skill from a mental to a physical stat?

Specifically the Craft skill, and from INT to DEX, relating to a character that can carve whatever they see but doesn’t use intellect to do so as they are something of the classic Savant type which does not interface with the world through intellectual logic or thinking patterns.

I am ideally looking for a rule or mechanic that supports the concept, rather than just home-brewing something, if possible. If such a rule or mechanic doesn’t exist, then knowing that is helpful too. And something that can be taken at as low a level as possible, be it feat, trait, feature, item, or power.

I am aware of the Void Disciple ability of Void Release which swaps primary stats for all purposes temporarily, however, taking 10 levels of a prestige class for a 3/d ability is very suboptimal, and does not meet my requirements. The Variant rule for alternate ability skill checks is DM dependent, therefore it may not work when moving the character between different groups and thus is likewise not what I’m looking for.

WotC officially approved materials only please; such as Dungeon, Dragon, Rokugan, Dragonlance, Kingdoms of Kalamar, official co-owned sites, etc..

If your class gives you a choice of skills to be trained in, can you choose a skill you’re already trained in to gain a free skill choice?

I know that if a class would make you trained in a skill you’re already trained in, you can select another skill to become trained in.

My question is about classes that let you pick between certain skills to be trained in, for example the Fighter lets you pick between Acrobatics and Athletics.

If I’m already trained in Athletics because of my background, can I choose Athletics as my Fighter skill, so that I gain another free skill choice, thus having 4+Int skill choices, instead of the usual 3+Int for a Fighter? Or would I be forced to choose Acrobatics?

What is the point of having a different skill for Persuasion and Deception?

2 skills related to Charisma are Deception and Persuasion. A character could be proficient in any of the two. I know that a Cha (deception) check is made when a character attempts to convince someone else of a lie, while a Cha (Persuasion) check is made when arguments are used to convince someone of something.

To me the important distinction was always: is the arguments you are making based on a truth or a lie?

  • Trying to convince a guard that the king is in danger (a truth) and you need to get in the castle, with the intention of saving him? Persuasion.
  • Trying to convince a guard that the king is in danger (a lie) and you need to get in the castle, with the intention of stealing from the treasures? Deception.

But in the end, you’re still just trying to convince someone. The arguments that you use would be the same whether or not you are lying about them.

I’ve seen people say that Cha (deception) checks involve arguments that are harder to defend/prove. Yet a case where the party is ambushed by ghosts, in the middle of the city, would have a better chance convincing the guards that come asking about the commotion that it was simply a few drunks (Deception), than ghosts (Persuasion).

Why then is there a need for 2 different skills?

Preventing character skill from impeding player enjoyment

Let’s consider a player, whom we shall call Bob. Bob loves exciting gunfights and is a big John Woo fan. So he makes up “Shooty McShootenstein,” who is a master with a gun. One thing that Bob is not interested in is the cyberpunk hacking trope. So Shooty doesn’t really have any ability at that. From the player’s choices, it seems they want a game with lots of gunplay but no hacking. But here’s what happens in practice:

  • When Shooty gets into a gunfight, his high skill means he blows everyone away in a round or two, or a few minutes of table time. Bob’s real choices during this time are largely restricted to taking actions to stack additional bonuses that are mostly unnecessary or making tactical choices that are often rote. Bob is left unsatisfied.

  • When Shooty finds he needs to hack a computer, suddenly his choices open up! He can hire a hacker, threaten the owner, bluff about already having the information, etc. This will take considerably more table time. The problem is that it’s still indirectly all about hacking and is exactly what Bob didn’t want to play. He ends up bored because he doesn’t like this theme and his character is bad at it.

Many proposed suggestions don’t seem to help. Putting Shooty against better gunfighters is a good idea, except that in most systems, a gunfight between two characters with Firearms and Dodge skills at 20 have the same actions, probabilities, and modifier stacks as one between two sides with Firearms and Dodge at 2. Essentially, Bob might as well have played a much weaker character. Making the consequences for failing at the hacking-related stuff easier on the character might encourage Bob to experiment a bit, but fundamentally he’s still going to be bored because his share of spotlight time was spent in 2 minutes about him being awesome with a gun and 2 hours about him being a lousy hacker.

What techniques can be used to overcome this contradictory tendency in play, either as a game-master or as a player?

Is Wisdom (survival) skill used for both tracking and finding tracks?

It is mentioned that to follow tracks you need to find them. It is also mentioned it can take up to an hour outdoor to find tracks you have lost (all under tracking, which is Wisdom (Survival).

The way I read it would be to use Survival no matter the situation (for both finding and following) but I read some people would use perception or investigation to find the tracks. When looking at the table for Sylvan random encounter in DMG p.87, in one entry it uses Wisdom (Survival) to both find and follow the tracks.

Also, I see a problem using other skills to find the tracks for a Ranger character because Ranger favored enemy feature states you have advantage on Wisdom (Survival) to track your favored enemy. Then it would be very strange for the Ranger not being able to find tracks he could easily follow due to his advantage on a check. And what if the Ranger for some reason is not proficient in perception would never be able to find tracks so not able to follow any?

So, the question is easy but I fear the answer is not as I was not able to find a straight answer to it.

I want to make sure that any character who want to become a good tracker (either through ranger or rogue sub-class) can do so. I feel that having to be good at 2 or 3 skills to accomplish one thing (i.e.tracking) is not the common usage of skills in 5e.

thanks for helping out.

What is the highest average charisma skill check a solo character can get, without using magic?

I was building a character that had levels in Feywanderer ranger, that gains Otherworldly Glamour which allows you to add wisdom to charisma checks, and then I noticed Samurai fighters get Elegant Courtier which has the same bonus.

Emboldened by the fact they stack, I started to look for other class features that let you reroll failed intimidation checks or gain advantage.

It made me wonder, what is the highest possible charisma skill check by a solo character?

(This means no spells, or magic items and no outside assistance except by summoned/created creatures, e.g. a familiar using the help action is ok, but a party member using flash of genius is not.).

Is there any official (or semi-official) clarification on how often Psychic Virtuoso allows a character to use occult skill unlocks?

The description of the Psychic Virtuoso feat from Occult Adventures states "You can use all of your occult skill unlocks more often and you are more talented at using them." However, the Benefit section only lists a bonus for using them, nothing about using them more often. I cannot find any errata or clarification for this feat indicating either it doesn’t actually let you use occult skill unlocks more often or, if it does, how often it allows a character to use them.

Does Quickness work in the midst of battle without Skill Mastery?

The description of Quickness indicates that it only works with Routine actions.

You can perform routine tasks—anything that can be done as a routine check (see Routine Checks in The Basics)—fast, perhaps very fast. Subtract your effect rank from the normal time rank to perform a task to determine how long it takes you. So, for example, if you have Quickness 7, a routine task normally taking an hour (time rank 9) takes you (9 – 7 = time rank 2) 30 seconds. Non-routine checks are not affected by Quickness, nor is movement speed.

Without Skill Mastery, which allows routine checks in non-routine situations for a skill, does that mean that, under pressure, the person with Quickness can’t employ their skills? That when The Flash is being shot at, his ability to quickly perform normally routine tasks goes away? That seems counter to the source material, and also counter to the Time Stop ability in the Time Powers Power Profile, which includes Quickness with a Quirk that only routine actions can be performed.

Time Stop: Quickness (Subtle 2), Speed (Subtle 2), Quirk: Limited to routine actions while active (–4 points) • 2 points per rank

The 2E version instead used a version of routine tasks based on the "Take 20" mechanic which applied to skills where there was no penalty for failure and included on the chart which skills that could be used for.

You can perform routine tasks quickly. For purposes of this power a “routine task” is one where you can take 20 on the check. At rank 1 you perform such tasks at twice normal speed (x2). Each additional rank moves your speed one step up the Time and Value Progression Table (x5, x10, x25, and so forth). At rank 20, you perform routine tasks at 5 million times normal speed! Tasks where you cannot take 20 (including combat actions) are unaffected by Quickness, nor is movement speed

How exactly would one use the Profession (Cook) skill?

For one of the campaigns I’m going to be starting soon, most of our time will be spent out of ‘civilization,’ so our GM ruled that we would have to either acquire our own food from the wilderness (through uses of the Survival skill), or we would have to buy enough food to sustain us as we travel.

After hearing this, I ask our GM if it would be helpful for me to take ranks in Profession (Cook) to prepare food while we were out (because it might be possible that we could buy some ingredients and then make a lower DC Survival check to find enough food to supplement the ingredients we had already bought). He said that this would be a great idea, I just had to find reasonable rules for buying ingredients.

So I pored over Ultimate Equipment trying to find ingredients, and I found these “ingredients:” Bread, Caviar, Cheese, Chocolate, Fortune cookie, Honey, Ice cream, Maple syrup, Meat, Travel cake mix, and Yogurt, within the “food and drink” section; and Allspice, Basil, Beans, Cardamom, Chicken, Chilies, Cinnamon, Citrus, Cloves, Coffee beans, Cumin, Dill, Fennel, Flour, Garlic, Ginger, Mint, Mustard, Nutmeg, Nuts, Oregano, Pepper, Potatoes, Rosemary, Saffron, Salt, Sugar, Tobacco, Turnips, Vanilla, Wheat in the “trade goods” section.

This is a decent amount of ingredients yes, but there arises a different question, how much of what is needed to make a given meal? Then, how could it be edited to fit the survivalists helping supplement?