Would the Gust spell be able to move someone under the effect of the Levitate spell?

I am playing an air genasi storm sorcerer. Air genasi have the Mingle with the Wind racial trait, which lets them cast the levitate spell once per long rest (with no material components).

The description of the levitate spell says:

One creature or object of your choice that you can see within range rises vertically, up to 20 feet, and remains suspended there for the duration. The spell can levitate a target that weighs up to 500 pounds. An unwilling creature that succeeds on a Constitution saving throw is unaffected.

The target can move only by pushing or pulling against a fixed object or surface within reach (such as a wall or a ceiling), which allows it to move as if it were climbing. You can change the target’s altitude by up to 20 feet in either direction on your turn. If you are the target, you can move up or down as part of your move. Otherwise, you can use your action to move the target, which must remain within the spell’s range.

The description of gust states:

You seize the air and compel it to create one of the following effects at a point you can see within range:

  • One Medium or smaller creature that you choose must succeed on a Strength saving throw or be pushed up to 5 feet away from you.

  • You create a small blast of air capable of moving one object that is neither held nor carried and that weighs no more than 5 pounds. The object is pushed up to 10 feet away from you. It isn’t pushed with enough force to cause damage.

  • You create a harmless sensory affect using air, such as causing leaves to rustle, wind to slam shutters shut, or your clothing to ripple in a breeze.

I wanted to use the gust cantrip to move myself 5 feet in a direction, but my GM said it wouldn’t work, as levitate only allows the target to move by physical means as the spell states, and I couldn’t cast gust to target myself anyways.

I didn’t argue at the time, but having reread the spells, I’m not sure why it wouldn’t work.

Is it possible to cast levitate on yourself, then use gust to move yourself 5 feet?

Does the Clone spell make someone effectively immortal?

While reading through PHB 5e spell list, I found an interesting spell: Clone.

This spell grows an inert duplicate of a living creature as a safeguard against death. This clone forms inside a sealed vessel and grows to full size and maturity after 120 days; you can also choose to have the clone be a younger version of the same creature. It remains inert and endures indefinitely, as long as its vessel remains undisturbed.

At any time after the clone matures, if the original creature dies, its soul transfers to the clone, provided that the soul is free and willing to return. The clone is physically identical to the original and has the same personality, memories, and abilities, but none of the original’s equipment.

One might assume that dying of old age triggers the spell, and that the character is restored to life in a new (younger, of course) clone. That would make anyone with access to that spell (either by being a 15th-level wizard or by having such a wizard nearby) and a little bit of gold (3k, really? And if the wizard is 17th level, it isn’t even a problem) effectively immortal, right? And, if we were talking about the real world (or at least some fictional world where such thing is explicitly available by design, such as EVE Online’s world), than the answer would probably be YES.

But, we live in the cruel world of D&D, where characters can have this ability:

At 15th level, your ki sustains you so that you suffer none of the frailty of old age, and you can’t be aged magically. You can still die of old age, however. In addition, you no longer need food or water.

…and can, as being said, still die of old age without ageing. So the question is not really as simple. There is a point suggesting that such a scheme of constantly recloning yourself each time back to your younger self might work by RAW:

  • All spells, that somehow restore the dead back to the living (like Resurrection) have an explicit exception defined, that this spell cannot restore life back to someone who died from old age. The Clone spell does not have that kind of exception, however. So, by the basic D&D rule of Specific beats General, it seems that any spell that would restore life back to dead without such an exception would be able to do so even if they would die from being too old.

So, to summarize my reasoning, the question bothering me is this:
Does the Clone spell allow someone with access to it to be able to live forever?

P.S. If I self-answered the question, I apologize. It just seems to me kind of confusing and I would like to hear some other opinions to understand the designer intentions behind this spell.

When or why would someone use a programming language (Swift, Java, C++, Rust etc…) over an engine like Unity?

Everytime I’ve read about people asking whether they should write their game in C++ or Unity, Unity is usually the default answer, unless they want to go through the hassle of creating an engine by themselves when Unity already does everything for you. If that’s the case is there ever a case where writing a game in C++, Java, Rust etc… is better than using Unity? If so what are these cases?

Can you force Arcane Armor off of someone?

I’m a DM and one of my party members wants to use it to be able to walk without legs so it’s just armor carrying a body (were starting at 5th level if your wondering). I want a way to make this a disadvantage and basically render him useless for a battle or two for fun. I know it says that The armor attaches to you and can’t be removed against your will but i was wondering if there was a spell or some condition that would get rid of the magic on it or something.

Can I use a Ring of Telekinesis to tie someone in ropes and then levitate them?

My character recently obtained a Ring of Telekinesis:

While wearing this ring, you can cast the Telekinesis spell at will, but you can target only Objects that aren’t being worn or carried.

I also happen to have some unbreakable rope. Since the Telekinesis spell allows me to

…exert fine control on Objects with your Telekinetic grip, such as manipulating a simple tool, opening a door or a container, stowing or retrieving an item from an open container, or pouring the contents from a vial

Could I use my action to wrap/tie an opponent in rope, and then move the rope into the air, dragging them along?

Can the Command spell force someone to answer a question in a Zone of Truth?

If you have an enemy in a Zone of Truth who failed their save, they can still choose to not answer. If a player casts Command on them with the word being "answer" would that force the creature to answer the question posed? Similarly, what if you cast the command "lie" on a creature in a Zone of Truth?

Can someone under the effect of Join Pasts lie?

Specifically looking at Pathfinder’s Join Pasts, which reads:

With touches to the targets’ foreheads, you bring them into mental communion. The targets can share thoughts and experiences, but not words. When one target attempts to Recall Knowledge, the other can Aid the first target’s skill check, using any Lore skill (even if that Lore wouldn’t normally apply) without having made any preparations to Aid.

Could someone under the effect of this cantrip lie when sharing a thought or an experience? In my game, we’ve used this spell to look at a target’s past experiences and see things through their eyes – but the idea that they could just lie (for instance, by sharing that they grew up impoverished or were stolen from) came up recently.

Can you carry someone while levitating?

The levitate spell targets "One creature or loose object of your choice that you can see within range . . . that weighs up to 500 pounds." If you’re airborne from casting levitate on yourself, could you then pick up another creature?

Is the answer different if your total weight is greater than or less than 500 pounds?

Would the weight of the second creature also need to fit within your carrying capacity as described in Can someone flying with winged boots/boots of flying carry someone?

If your passenger was unwilling, would you simply need to have successfully grappled them?