Can someone figure out the damage equation in this game?

So there’s this pretty obscure turn based RPG game called Gods Lands of Infinity. So there’s a melee power of each character in this game. In this case, the Melee Power is 132. Each weapon also has a damage of their own, and in this case, the weapon damage is 9-11. Now, attacking on a enemy who has defense of -30, the damage output is 11-13. If the weapon’s base damage is increased to 12-14, the damage output becomes 14-17.

Can someone figure out the damage equation in this game?

I got this error code while trying to connect to a minecraft server can someone help me with it

error message I received upon trying to connect to the server

upon trying to connect to a Minecraft server but I got this error message “io.netty.channel.AbstractChannel$ AnnotatedConectException: Connection timed out; no further information” I think it has something to do with input/output since the first letters are IO but other than that I’m completely in the dark I asked several moderators on the server and they didn’t have any idea what was going on either so I was hoping some of the users on here could help me solve this error and play on the server with my friends

Why it bothers if someone can de-anonymize anonymous network (like Tor)?

So we all know that NSA has the ability to track down Tor, I2P and all those anonymous networks. I know it’s a piece of old news, but the question always shows up in my mind. Which is why bother it? I mean all your communication is encrypted through public key cryptography even through the simplest HTTPS connection, so apparently, they can’t see what you’re sending through the network. So unless you’re visiting know illegal website, they shouldn’t be able to track you down isn’t it.

Like if you’re talking with your friend through FB’s Messenger, let’s say. There’s so much traffic in and out through FB’s servers, how would they be possible to identify that this traffic is between you and server and then track you down to your location by the IP exploit from the connection (as it’s one of the few stuff that isn’t encrypted).

If that’s true, then why bother if NSA has the ability to de-anonymize Tor network. Or even simpler, why should you use Tor network there isn’t any difference between standard HTTPS anymore? Plus, they still can’t identify you out from that pool of connection through FB server and with a Tor it might even standout from theirs view.

Whatsapp How to hide someone profile picture?

I’m not sure whether this is the right place to ask this. Just let me know if there is a more appropriate place to ask this question.

I hate her profile picture I don’t want to see it. It’s hurting me. However we still do chats.

How to achieve this?

Problem is it’s not possible and inappropriate to request her to remove me from her contact right?

Can someone tell me a different way of writing this line of code?

I know this is a strange question but for research purposes could anyone tell me a different way of writing this line of code? I am making a word cloud in The “forEach(s -> ignoreWords.add(s.toUpperCase()));” is the line of code I would like to change. Preferably not a lambda

Thanks very much in advance!!!!

Researched numerous pages

BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(input));

ignoreWords = new HashSet<String>();  

Stream stream = Files.lines(Paths.get(“/ignorewords.txt”));

stream.forEach(s -> ignoreWords.add(s.toUpperCase())); 

How can Enigma secret contract prevent someone to see transactions history of a user?

Enigma protocol is a second-layer, off-chain network that aims to solve the two problems for blockchains: scalability and privacy. Enigma is a peer-to-peer network, enabling different parties to jointly store and run computations on data while keeping the data completely private. An external blockchain is utilized as the controller of the network, manages access control and identities, and serves as a tamper-proof log of events. (Enigma website: https://www.media.mit.edu/projects/enigma/overview/) (Enigma blog: https://blog.enigma.co/)

In Enigma blog, there is an article (Link to Article), explaining the secret contract, including an example as follows:

“To give an example of a potential secret contract, imagine a lending dApp that can autonomously give out loans to users. To function, it operates a smart contract that tests each individual’s eligibility by scanning their wallets and prior transactions, then computing if the individual should receive a loan (and if so — how big it should be). For example, it may examine if you asked for loans in the past, and whether you paid them back on time.

With a normal smart contract, a user would need to disclose all of their transactions publicly. This means that everyone would have complete visibility to your finances. Since most users aren’t likely to opt into such a service, the only option left to the dApp provider is to keep the actual computation of eligibility centralized, in order to limit the exposure of the sensitive data to the provider itself. In this hybrid approach the dApp is no longer autonomous or truly decentralized, as it cannot operate without the aid of the provider. The dApp thus retains all of the weaknesses of centralized applications, with few of the advantages.

Instead, in a setting where secret contracts exist, a user can share their transaction history safely with the secret contract itself. The nodes can execute the contract and receive the eligibility result without being able to observe the user’s transactions. There is no longer a need to create a hybrid dApp. This dApp could be autonomous end-to-end, while guaranteeing both correctness — if a user is eligible for a loan, she will get a loan; and privacy — no one but the user can see their transaction history.”

My question is about the following phrases:

(1) “With a normal smart contract, a user would need to disclose all of their transactions publicly”

(2) “Instead, in a setting where secret contracts exist, a user can share their transaction history safely with the secret contract itself. The nodes can execute the contract and receive the eligibility result without being able to observe the user’s transactions.”

From my point of view, a user eventually needs to present himself by using his address (either by normal contract, or by secret contract), by which it is possible for everybody to see all his transactions history using an explorer website.

(1) How can Enigma secret contract prevent someone to see transactions history of a user?

And

(2) How can a user conceal his address and at the same time receive the loan, using secret contract?

Note: Please note that according to an agreement, questions about blockchain is brought up in Bitcoin stack exchange.

Can someone explain what exactly is derived address?

Let’s say my mnemonic words are

army van defense carry jealous true garbage claim echo media make crunch

When I used https://iancoleman.io/bip39/#english, the section, Derived Address, showed me a lot of addresses. Among them, I found an address that my wallet showed, but the address would change time to time?

Why does my address change?

I understand that Derived Address are children of Account Extended Private/Public Keys, but why isn’t my wallet showing me all of those addresses that I can use?

What is the maximum number of Derived Address for m / 44 / 0 / 0 / 0 / * ?

Are all the address valid and working? Meaning, can I send a payment to any of the address from the Derived Address and will I still get the cryptocurrency?

If I import any listed Derived Private Key to another wallet, can I use the funds in there?

If I am able to generate the same public key as someone else, do I also get the same private key?

I have a very basic understanding of the asymetric encryption. I have a couple of simple questions. I know I can generate a key pair, of public and private keys.

  • If by co-incidence my public key that is generated is the same as a public key of someone else. Does this mean we will also have the same private keys?

Second related question.

  • If the answer is yes to the first question. Then, is it in theory, possible to have a huge database of all known public keys and keep randomly generating key pairs and checking against the database if any of them match.

Breaking one specific key, is very hard. But is breaking any key also hard? If someone tries to find a match with publicly known key they could somehow break one or a handful of them. If not, what stops this from happening.

Thanks! : )