Can I repeatedly Awaken something in order to give it a variety of languages?

So, the Awaken spell must be cast on a beast or plant with int of 3 or less. For beasts, it has the following permanent effect: "The target gains an Intelligence of 10. The target also gains the ability to speak one language you know." It has a casting time of 8 hours.

The Feeblemind spell will, among other things, reduce the target’s int to 1 for a duration measured in months. The 4d6 psychic damage is nontrivial, but still manageable. Feeblemind does not appear to do anything to known languages, and can be cured with Greater Restoration, Heal, or Wish.

Would it be possible, then, to repeatedly Feeblemind and Awaken something so as to give it an arbitrary number of spoken languages? (Assuming you could get the assistance of reasonably high-level druids who knew the various languages in question.)

Does something count as “dealing damage” if its damage is reduced to zero?

An example of a feature where this sort of thing matters is the Optional Favored Foe feature for the Ranger from Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything (emphasis mine):

[…] The first time on each of your turns that you hit the favored enemy and deal damage to it, including when you mark it, you can increase that damage by 1d4. […]

This clearly means that if you hit with an attack that never deals damage, you would not trigger Favored Foe, but what happens if you hit with an attack that can deal damage but that damage was reduced to zero by either damage reduction, resistance, immunity or some other sort of feature; have you still dealt damage?


This question is different from the following:

  • Does dealing 0 damage to a concentrating spellcaster require a saving throw?

As Constitution saving throws result from a creature taking damage, not from a creature dealing damage.

Heat Metal on Animated Armour – Can something be both an object and a creature? [duplicate]

Heat metal says (Emphasis mine) :

Choose a manufactured metal object, such as a metal weapon or a suit of heavy or medium metal armor, that you can see within range. You cause the object to glow red-hot. Any creature in physical contact with the object takes 2d8 fire damage when you cast the spell. Until the spell ends, you can use a bonus action on each of your subsequent turns to cause this damage again.

The target in this case was Animated armour (which is a construct).

In our session we did rule that it could work just because it fit well with the story. We played it out that the metal was melting and deforming so the joints wouldn’t work. However the issue we had comes down to:

Can something be both an object and a creature?

The armour needs to be a manufactured object for the spell to work (and it specifically mentions a suit of metal armour) but also needs to be a creature to take the damage.

I don’t understand something very basic about proxies – please help

Hi,

I don’t get all of this proxy thing, I will explain.

1. If I do many searches in google in a short period of time, my IP will get banned from doing further searches – thus I need a proxy – right ?

2. If I buy a proxy IP and do the same thing it then will ban my proxy – right ?

So why do I need a proxy ?  and how will it help me ?

What happens when I’m invisible and something I’m wearing has Light cast on it?

The bard in my group cast the light spell on an amulet he was wearing. Then after triggering a trap, he cast invisibility on himself.

What happens in this situation? The amulet is now invisible but does it stop emitting light because of this? Or is the amulet invisible but the light it emits still visible?

Has anyone got a decent ruling on what should happen in this situation?

When a ysoki is holding items in his cheek pouches, can others tell if they have something in there?

The rules on ysoki cheek pouches are rather vague on whether objects held inside them are actually concealed. It seems possible that someone else would be able to determine that the ysoki was concealing something either by visible bulge or by the impact the object has on the ysoki’s speech. Is there any published Starfinder source that addresses this question? If not, is there anything about rodent biology that suggests a good ruling?

Something weird going on with my algorithm?

I wrote an algorithm for data analysis using the CERN ROOT framework. It takes in three files of sorted UNIX timestamps from a single year, and pairs them up in the closest triplets, where each file contributes a triplet, and each triplet is unique. I know there are some more "well known" algorithms for accomplishing this, however this algorithm completes the task much faster, clocking in at about 20 minutes on my machine, as compared to many, many hours for some of the other algorithms I’ve tried. When complete, the algorithm plots the triplets (of the form {a,b,c]) on a 2-dimensional histogram, where the horizontal axis is a-b, and the vertical axis is a-c.

Problem is, it seems to be acting very weird. Namely, when I feed the algorithm one file of real data (these are timestamps generated by an experiment) and two files of completely random data, I get these weird diagonal lines: https://filebin.net/spbswnhkfy8xdkp8/random_plot.pdf?t=48f2yhjq. When I feed the algorithm three files of real data, a single diagonal line through the middle (and two more lines, running horizontally and vertically) appears if I use enough bins. Any idea what’s going on with my algorithm?

void unbiasedAnalysis(){  TNtupleD *D  = new TNtupleD("D","D","x:y");  ROOT::RDataFrame statn1("D", "./pathtodata"); ROOT::RDataFrame statn2("D", "./pathtodata"); ROOT::RDataFrame statn3("D", "./pathtodata");  vector<double> vec_1, vec_2, vec_3; statn1.Foreach([&](double tstamp){ vec_1.push_back(tstamp); },{"UNIX"}); statn2.Foreach([&](double tstamp){ vec_2.push_back(tstamp); },{"UNIX"}); statn3.Foreach([&](double tstamp){ vec_3.push_back(tstamp); },{"UNIX"});  vector<vector<double>> pairs; for(auto tstamp : vec_1){      double first,second;      //get iterator pointing to closest element greater than or equal to     auto geq = std::lower_bound(vec_2.begin(), vec_2.end(), tstamp);     //get iterator pointing to nearest element less than     auto leq = geq - 1;      double foo = tstamp - *geq;     double bar = tstamp - *leq;      //compare iterators, save the closest      if(dabs(foo) <  dabs(bar)){ first = *geq; }     else { first = *leq; }         //repeat     geq = std::lower_bound(vec_3.begin(), vec_3.end(), tstamp);     leq = geq - 1;      foo = tstamp - *geq;     bar = tstamp - *leq;      if(dabs(foo) < dabs(bar)){ second = *geq; }     else { second = *leq; }      //add to pairs     pairs.push_back({tstamp, first, second, (tstamp-first), (tstamp-second), std::min((tstamp-first), (tstamp-second))});  }  //sort vector of vectors by size of smallest difference std::sort(pairs.begin(), pairs.end(),     [](const vector<double>& A, const vector<double>& B){         return A[5] < B[5]; });  std::set<double> cache;  ROOT::EnableImplicitMT();  for(auto pair : pairs){     //if not in cache, add to TNtuple     if(cache.find(pair[1]) == cache.end() && cache.find(pair[2]) == cache.end()){              D->Fill(pair[3],pair[4]);          //add to cache         cache.insert(pair[1]); cache.insert(pair[2]);     } }  D->Draw("x:y>>htemp(100,-0.02,0.02,100,-0.02,0.02)","","colz"); 

}

Does sslstrip have to do something with Bettercap’s certificate?

I am trying to perform a MITM attack using bettercap against a website that doesn’t have the HSTS security policy implemented at all.

When I try the following command: bettercap -T AddressIpoftheTarget -X --proxy --https-proxy, it works fine. Bettercap succeeds in injecting his own self-signed certificate to the web browser. The browser shows the "Not Secure" warning, and lets me accept the invalid certificate by proceeding to the website in an unsecure way.

When I try this command: bettercap -T AddressIpoftheTarget -X --https-proxy it doesn’t work. I don’t understand why the --proxy is needed. Is it because it enables the sslstrip? How does sslstrip contribute in all of this during this scenario?