Does a creature under the effect of Motivational Speech still get advantage on their next attack if the spell ends for them?

The spell motivational speech (Acquisitions Incorporated, pg. 77) says:

For the duration, each affected creature gains 5 temporary hit points and has advantage on Wisdom saving throws. If an affected creature is hit by an attack, it has advantage on the next attack roll it makes. Once an affected creature loses the temporary hit points granted by this spell, the spell ends for that creature.

So when the effected creature is hit by an attack, the spell grants the creature advantage on their next attack. But getting hit by an attack is going to be accompanied by damage – and 5 points seems like it will very often be gone with a single attack.

Does a creature hit by an attack still get advantage on its next attack if that attack dealt 5 or more damage? Or does the spell end for them immediately and they do not get advantage on the next attack?

It just seems like this effect is going to be self-defeating a lot of the time – the thing that grants the advantage is the thing that takes it away. Am I missing something?

Note, temporary hitpoints are always lost first, so no holding on to them while subtracting damage from your standard hitpoint pool. Sorry Jim, it was a clever thought.

Can I exclude characters from understanding my magically understandable speech from the monk’s Tongue of the Sun and Moon feature?

The rules for the monk ability Tongue of the Sun and Moon state:

Starting at 13th level, you learn to touch the ki of other minds so that you understand all spoken languages. Moreover, any creature that can understand a language can understand what you say.
PHB, pp.79

The text says that this ability is something you learn to do, not something that simply happens to you, so it’s not necessarily always on. Further, it seems logical to say that this is something you would do actively. That is, you could choose not to touch someone’s mind, thereby excluding them from understanding you. You could also choose not to understand someone yourself, just in case they’re telling the funniest joke in the world, or using a subliminal trigger.

Assuming you can choose not to touch someone’s mind, let’s reason further. Suppose you’re speaking and don’t know that there is someone listening in nearby. Would they understand you, i.e. is the default that you are or aren’t touching someone’s mind? Similarly, if you are speaking to a large group of people, would you have to focus on all of them at once for them to understand you? Would this take effort? Is there a range?

My questions are:

  1. Can you exclude some characters from understanding you while allowing others to do so?
  2. Can you decide not to understand someone who is speaking?

Basically, these boil down to: Can you choose not to touch someone’s mind?

Then, assuming that the answer to the above is yes:

  1. Do you have to know someone is listening in order for them to understand you?
  2. Is there a limit to the number of people you can affect? A range?

I also asked this related question about the mechanism of the ability.

What’s the mechanism for magically understood speech from the monk’s Tongue of the Sun and Moon feature?

The rules for the monk ability Tongue of the Sun and Moon state:

Starting at 13th level, you learn to touch the ki of other minds so that you understand all spoken languages. Moreover, any creature that can understand a language can understand what you say.
PHB, pp.79

How does the meaning get transferred? Some possibilities I’ve thought of:

  1. The listener hears the words as the speaker forms them, and the meaning is sort of empathically transferred.
  2. The listener hears the words in a language he understands, Star Trek style, without hearing any of the actual mouth-sounds.
  3. When monk comes in contact with someone who speaks a language A, he rips the understanding of the language out of their mind and can thereafter actually speak A.
    • This is less likely, because it doesn’t say that he gains the new language, as such. However, perhaps he gains only the spoken language, and not the written part.
  4. The monk simply does understand all spoken languages after this level, and the bit about ki is just flavor text.

The first two answers imply that there needs to be another mind present who speaks A. The third implies that the monk at least needs to come across an A-speaker to understand it. The fourth implies that he can just speak and understand A upon leveling up.

I then have a follow up question, which might influence the way we think about the first one. The Magic Mouth spell (PHB pp.257) allows you to leave a message for others to hear, triggered by a circumstance of your choice. I think I’m in safe territory to say that the monk would definitely understand the message (“all spoken languages”). When the monk hears the message, how is he understanding it? The speaker’s mind isn’t there to be touched. Further, even if there’s some magic hoodoo going on there, what if (and please do forgive me for going outside the setting, but I couldn’t resist exploring the theory) he heard a radio, or a phonograph?

Along a similar vein, if (the gods only know why) you had a Monk 13/Wizard or Bard 3, and you cast Magic Mouth, could you specify that anyone hearing it would understand?

Summing up:

  1. How does the monk communicate meaning?
  2. Would the monk be able to understand a recorded message, where the one who left it might not even have a mind anymore?
  3. Can the monk leave a fully understandable message?

I also asked this related question about choosing who gets to understand the monk.

4 Steps to Reach Your Goals Achieve Success FASTER Emotional Speech

4 Steps to Reach Your Goals Achieve Success FASTER Emotional Speech Set goals. Setting goals and putting them in a plan is important for achieving them, as there are some basics to follow when setting goals, including: Clearly define the goal, which is what needs to be achieved, and be measurable, in addition to its realism in order to challenge the person himself, while avoiding setting impossible goals to avoid frustration and failure, and a time limit must be set to achieve them. Setting…

4 Steps to Reach Your Goals Achieve Success FASTER Emotional Speech

Can a character with the Actor feat mimic speech they heard before they learned the feat?

The Actor Feat:

You can mimic the speech of another person or the sounds made by other creatures. You must have heard the person speaking. or heard the creature make the sound, for at least 1 minute.

If a player learns this feat at 8th level, can they mimic speech they heard back when they were first level and did not have the feat?

What about a speech heard 200 years ago when they were but a small elven child?

RAW, I think it’s allowed. And I don’t think it breaks the game to allow it. But I’m curious if there are any aspects of this that I’m missing. I would assume that for the 200-year old speech, that it would at least have to have been memorable in some way! 🙂

What is Dark Speech?

In the D&D 5e DMG, the artifact called the Book of Vile Darkness has the following property (pp. 223-224):

Dark Speech. While you carry the Book of Vile Darkness and are attuned to it, you can use an action to recite words from its pages in a foul language known as Dark Speech. Each time you do so, you take 1d12 psychic damage, and each non-evil creature within 15 feet of you takes 3d6 psychic damage.

What actually is Dark Speech (as in, the language)? Is there any lore from 5e or previous editions of D&D that expands on this?