Can a lower-level spellcaster recharge a staff?

While doing research for another recent question, I ran into two back-to-back lines that seem to contradict each other. From the PFSRD, emphasis mine:

Each morning, when a spellcaster prepares spells or regains spell slots, he can also imbue one staff with a portion of his power so long as one or more of the spells cast by the staff is on his spell list and he is capable of casting at least one of the spells. Imbuing a staff with this power restores one charge to the staff, but the caster must forgo one prepared spell or spell slot of a level equal to the highest-level spell cast by the staff.

Say you have a simple fire staff with burning hands, fireball, and maybe even delayed blast fireball. The first line says that any spellcaster capable of casting any 1 of the 3 should be able to recharge that staff. But the second line states that the recharging spellcaster needs to give up a slot of the highest spell level the staff holds specifically. So how does one reconcile the two statements?

I have a few ideas… in order from least to most forgiving to the player ^_^

a) The spellcaster cannot recharge the staff (statement 2 being more specific overrides statement 1).

b) The spellcaster can recharge the staff by forgoing his highest available spell slot (gets as close as possible to fulfilling statement 2 while being allowed by statement 1).

c) The spellcaster can recharge the staff by forgoing his highest spell slot that matches a spell the staff can cast (so in the example, a wizard without fireball could forgo a first-level slot for burning hands, but a wizard with 3rd to 6th level spells would have to give up a 3rd level instead; the most literal combination of the two statements).

d) The spellcaster can recharge the staff for free (statement 1 clearly says “he can recharge this staff” but the cost defined in statement 2 is unpayable; ergo the cost is waived but the explicitly allowed effect is still granted).

Can a spellcaster anticipate that the duration of a spell he’s concentrating on is about to end?

For example, when a wizard casts invisibility, that target is invisible until they attack or after the duration of an one hour. Say a player wants to explore for 59 minutes, then duck into an alley as the duration expires. It would be a challenge for anyone to anticipate, by the second or even by the minute, when a 60 minute interval is going to end. Or maybe they would feel the spell waning?

This is similar to Does a spellcaster know when concentration ends?, but it’s a different question.

Does a spellcaster have knowledge of remaining spell duration?

Simply put, does a spell caster know how much time is left until a spell they cast expires? For example, if Espio the spymaster cast Disguise Self (PHB 233) to infiltrate a city, would he know how long until his disguise wears off? Or is he left “in the dark” until it expires?

Currently, I can think of 3 possibilities:

  1. Precision Knowledge: Espio knows precisely how much time remains.

  2. Imprecise Knowledge: Espio has a vague sense of when the spell is running out, but not exactly when it will (think a yellow traffic light).

  3. No Knowledge: Espio doesn’t know how much time is left.

I would prefer RAW, but anything logically argued would be appreciated as well.

Under what conditions does a Martial Spellcaster need the Warcaster feat to comfortably cast spells?

I had a player recently come to me about playing an Eldritch Knight character, and they had questions about their ability to cast spells while holding a weapon (or two), and were debating taking the Warcaster feat (PHB, 170) to mitigate specifically those issues. At my table, I try to take the somatic/material component requirements of spells seriously, so I want to make sure I have a grasp of what can or cannot be done when a spellcaster holding weapons tries to cast a spell, or return to attacking after having cast a spell.

One thing I’m especially interested in is the degree to which the character can "comfortably" do the actions listed. "Comfortably" in this context means that the character isn’t taking certain actions which might be technically legal according to the rules of the game, but which might inconvenience them under common circumstances. A common example is a Two Weapon Fighting character who drops a weapon to the ground to grab their spellcasting focus for casting; if they have to move, they risk leaving their weapon behind on the ground, so from my perspective, this wouldn’t qualify as a "comfortable" maneuver.

So, for the following builds, under what conditions is the character able to cast spells, and to what degree does the Warcaster feat improve their ability to do so?

  • Holding a one-handed weapon
  • Holding two one-handed weapons
  • Holding a one-handed weapon and Shield (neither Cleric nor Paladin)
  • Holding a one-handed weapon and Shield (Cleric or Paladin)
    • I’m separating these two out because Clerics and Paladins both get the ability to affix a Holy Symbol to their shield and therefore use their Shield as they would a Material Component. So I think the answer to this question is necessarily different depending on whether the spellcaster is a paladin or an Eldritch Knight, for example.
  • Holding a two-handed weapon

How to get the most feats for a spellcaster?

I have an idea for a spellcaster character but it needs as many feats as possible.

I’m aware that things that grant bonus feats are rare or non-existant. I don’t really need any feats, just spellcaster-relevant feats – you know, Spell Focus, Spell Penetration, Metamagic feats and such.

Things like Fighter bonus feats are ofc irrelevant here since it only grants combat feats and I wouldn’t get spell slots.

Is there a way to get more spellcasting feats than the obvious Human Wizard?


Loremaster Prestige class can grant a bonus feat at first level while progressing spellcasting which is good. The catch is that it requires a Skill Focus feat as prerequisite which makes it useless unless there is a way to get Skill Focus as a bonus feat somehow.

Does a PF2e spellcaster who takes multiclass dedications into other spellcasting classes, and related spellcasting feats, gain more spell slots?

Ezren is a level 10 evocation wizard, and hence would have spell slots of the following levels:

+-------------+-----------------+ | Spell level | Number of slots | +-------------+-----------------+ |           1 |               4 | |           2 |               4 | |           3 |               4 | |           4 |               4 | |           5 |               4 | +-------------+-----------------+ 

However, at level 2 Ezren took the Sorcerer multiclass dedication. At level 4 he took Basic Sorcerer Spellcasting, and Bloodline Breadth at level 8.

How many spell slots does Ezren have in a given day? Is it:

+-------------+-----------------+ | Spell level | Number of slots | +-------------+-----------------+ |           1 |               6 | |           2 |               6 | |           3 |               6 | |           4 |               4 | |           5 |               4 | +-------------+-----------------+ 

Because at level 8, spellcasting archetype feats grant an additional spell slot of first, second and third level, AND the bloodline breadth feat increases each of these by one?

Or do these sources of spell slots not stack for some reason? Coming from fifth edition, a wizard who multiclasses sorcerer still has the same number of spell slots as a pure wizard, so I’d like to clarify my understanding here.

Can Rainbow Servant be combined with Versatile Spellcaster and Spontaneous Divination to cast all Cleric spells spontaneously?

A ridiculous idea has occurred to me and I’m looking to verify if really works. Consider the following build:

  • Wizard 5/Rainbow Servant 10 (a class from Complete Divine)
  • At Wizard 5, take Spontaneous Divination from Complete Champion so that you qualify for Versatile Spellcaster from Races of the Dragon.
  • Take Versatile Spellcaster at some point.
  • At Rainbow Servant 10, you gain access to the entire Cleric spell list.
  • Put together, Versatile Spellcaster and Rainbow Servant 10 should let a Wizard cast spontaneously from the entire Cleric spell list.

This gives me two questions, the first as a focus and the second as a supplemental:

  1. Does this actually work? My first objection is that I’m not quite sure if the Wizard automatically knows all of the Cleric spells at Rainbow Servant 10. If you have to record them in your spellbook, you’ll soon run out of gold.
  2. If this does work, can the "powerful non-Diviner spellcaster class that can also cast spontaneously from the entire Cleric spell list" idea be done better? The term "Rainbow Warake" seems to be in my memory.

Can others understand the content of the words embedded in the Message spell by the spellcaster, as well as those who respond to him?

Can others understand the content of the words embedded in the Message spell by the spellcaster, as well as those who respond to him?

Am I right that the meaning of the Message spell is transmitted through the verbal component, and for the answer the target must move its lips? (Can someone in this case understand the content transmitted by the spellcaster, by listening to sound or by reading lips, and the contents of the answer of the target, reading by its lips?)

Multiclass Paladin + Primary Spellcaster = What paladin spells can I prepare and cast?

I’m sure this has been asked somewhere already, but I couldn’t find it.

Let’s say I’m Paladin 5 / Warlock 7. https://www.dndbeyond.com/sources/basic-rules/customization-options#Spellcasting

When I choose what Paladin spells I know, I consider myself as a single-classed Paladin 5, which would have 2nd level spell slots, so I can know 2nd level Paladin spells.

Spells Known and Prepared. You determine what spells you know and can prepare for each class individually, as if you were a single-classed member of that class.

When I consider what spell slots I actually have, I look on the multiclass spellcaster table, and see that I only have 1st level Paladin spell slots.

Spell Slots. You determine your available spell slots by adding together all your levels in the bard, cleric, druid, sorcerer, and wizard classes, and half your levels (rounded down) in the paladin and ranger classes. Use this total to determine your spell slots by consulting the Multiclass Spellcaster table.

So, if I want to cast one of those 2nd level Paladin spells, I’ll need to use one of my 4th level spell slots from Warlock.

Is all of that correct?