Is Corpse Flower the only non-undead that can make an undead creature (excluding spells)?

Is the Corpse Flower the only creature that isn’t the undead-type to be able to make any sort of undead creature?

I mean by means other than the ability to cast spells and one of those spells might be a spell like Animate Dead.

I’m looking for other creature’s abilities, lair actions or diseases or magic items that aren’t simply vectors for spells like a Spell Scroll of Animate Dead.

Is the star chart a material component for the Guidance and Guiding Bolt spells from the Circle of Stars druid’s Star Map feature?

The Circle of Stars druid’s Star Map feature grants the following benefits (TCoE, p. 38):

You’ve created a star chart as part of your heavenly studies. It is a Tiny object and can serve as a spellcasting focus for your druid spells. You determine its form by rolling on the Star Map table or by choosing one.

While holding this map, you have these benefits:

  • You know the guidance cantrip.
  • You have the guiding bolt spell prepared. It counts as a druid spell for you, and it doesn’t count against the number of spells you can have prepared.
  • You can cast guiding bolt without expending a spell slot. You can do so a number of times equal to your proficiency bonus, and you regain all expended uses when you finish a long rest.

Neither guiding bolt nor guidance have a material component. It would seem from the language that RAW one must hold the chart in one hand and cast these spells with the other, unless one has the War Caster feat.

Is my interpretation of the rules correct? And what is actually intended?

Is the star chart a material component for guidance and guiding bolt?

Is this Enhanced Eyebite balanced vs other spells of comparable level and utility?

Motivation: Many, me included consider Eyebite be cool, but mechanically very underwhelming spell for its level. So, let’s make it a balanced choice. Still, this question does not depend on if original version really is weak or not, this is only about this homebrew version.

The classes to consider as users of the spell: Bard, Sorcerer and especially Warlock, who needs to choose it as an Arcanum, the only and unchangeable 6th level spell they’ll have.

The other spells to consider as comparison points specially: Hold Monster (similar effect on target at 5th level already, for Bard and Sorcerer up-castable to 6th level for 2 targets) and then as actual 6th level aternatives, Mass Suggestion and Mental Prison (in XGtE so paywalled link), which also can be used to take enemies out of a fight, and for which Mass Suggestion has great utility use as well. There doesn’t need to be comparison against the original version of Eyebite. You can also compare to other spells up to level 6, if you think they’re relevant for the same role.

Goal of the homebrew: Eyebite should be an equal contender, when the character reaches the point where they can choose these spells.

Does this Enhanced Eyebite, description below, meet the above goal?


Enhanced Eyebite

Level: 6th
Casting Time: 1 Action
Range/Area: Self
Components: V, S
Duration: Concentration, 1 hour
School: Necromancy
Attack/Save: WIS Save

For the spell’s duration, your eyes become an inky void imbued with dread power. One creature of your choice within 90 feet of you that you can see must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw or be affected by one of the following effects of your choice for the duration. On each of your turns until the spell ends, you can use your action to target another creature. If you target a creature again after it has succeeded on a saving throw against this casting of Eyebite, the creature has advantage on its saving throws.

Asleep. The target falls unconscious. It wakes up if it takes any damage or if another creature uses its action to shake the sleeper awake.

Panicked. The target is frightened of you. On each of its turns, the frightened creature must take the Dash action and move away from you by the safest and shortest available route, unless there is nowhere to move. If the target moves to a place at least 90 feet away from you where it can no longer see you, this effect ends.

Sickened. The target has disadvantage on attack rolls and ability checks. At the end of each of its turns, it can make another Wisdom saving throw. If it succeeds, the effect ends. If it fails, it takes 2d8 points of necrotic damage.

When cast at higher levels: The distance needed for Panicked effect to end increases by 10 feet for each level above 6th. The damage done by Sickened effect increases by 1d8 for each level above 6th.


Notes: Changes to original are highlighted for the benefit of those who know the original spell, even though comparison to original is not what I’m asking. The duration is increased to give this spell more utility, and ability to last for several encounters. The range is increased to match Hold Monster. The damage is added to Sickened effect, so it wouldn’t be strictly inferior to Panicked, which also gives the same disadvantages with different and arguable much stronger condition to end the effect. Scaling with level is added to keep the spell competitive at higher character levels. The ability to target same creature again is given so the spell doesn’t become useless if all enemies succeed at their saving throw, but disadvantage is given so that in most situation it’d still be better to do something else than keep spamming Eyebite at disadvantage.

How do the Spirit Guardians and Sanctuary spells interact?

A player in my group asked the DM:

  1. What if Cleric 1 was to cast spirit guardians and go for the heart of battle
  2. Then Cleric 2 cast sanctuary on him
  3. Then Cleric 1 just sits there not actively attacking, probably taking the Dodge action while keeping concentration on his spell.

This makes it OP because he would be sitting there dishing out massive damage, while enemies would have to make a DC 15 Wisdom saving throw to hit him, and if they actually succeed they would have to hit with disadvantage due to the Dodge action.

The crucial point lies in the wording of sanctuary:

If the warded creature makes an attack or casts a spell that affects an enemy creature, this spell ends.

Cleric 1 cast spirit guardians before sanctuary came into effect, so he will not attack or cast something for the time being; he just sits there.
But he is also keeping concentration on a spell that harms others.
What do you think? Does the sanctuary spell end or not?

Can a character without arms cast spells with somatic components?

My DM and I have been having friendly arguments, and we recently came to what would happen if my character lost all their limbs.

As a gnome beastmaster I said I would always sit on my mount and use mage hand (from magic initiate) when I need to eat or lift things. HOWEVER he argues I wouldn’t be able to perform the somatic component.

So, I ask: is there a way to cast spells without arms? My argument is that since I am learning the cantrip after losing my arms I would have learned it in a way that works with my stumps, but he points out the PHB is pretty clear you need a free hand.

Casting Somatic Spells while handless (rules as intended) [duplicate]

This question hasn’t popped up in any of my games, whether as DM or player, but I thought of it while coming up with character concepts and wondered how it should be ruled.

If a caster does not have hands, can they perform the somatic components of their spells?

For example, if a player has the idea to have a caster born without arms who uses somatic components using their "ghost limbs" should they be able to since the restriction that they’re not wielding weapons or a shield isn’t being infringed?

Alternatively, if the above is true, does that mean players couldn’t disable an enemy caster they captured by Skywalker-ing their hands so they don’t have a free hand to cast the spell with?

The Player’s handbook describes somatic components as:

Spellcasting gestures might include a forceful gesticulation or an intricate set of gestures. If a spell requires a somatic component, the caster must have free use of at least one hand to perform these gestures.

But I don’t know how I’d interpret this.

I guess the main question is do somatic component rules emphasize having a (free) hand or do they emphasize not wielding an item/weapon? Are there any official rules for these edge cases or is there a way to interpret the rules on somatic components that answers these questions?

Denying (NPC) divine casters the ability to regain spells

I am playing an epic D&D 3.5e PC in a medium-optimization (for an epic 3.5e, as I understand it, at least) game:

  • Most regular spells are available to the party (modulo those labeled Evil), although Wish/Miracle are significantly nontrivial in cost
  • Magic item creation isn’t something that can be relied on beyond scribing scrolls
  • Epic spells are seriously limited (I suspect most high-optimization epic casting is off-limits due to achievable spell DCs being limited to the sub-100 range after party spell slot contributions modify the DC, and even some basic epic spells like the SRD’s Soul Scry are a no-go)

My character (don’t ask me how) and their party, consist of:

  • My char: arcane gish, basically (the precise build details aren’t terribly important)
  • Party member A: another arcane gish (lower level than my char but not by too much)
  • Party member B: sneaky archer cleric (epic caster, but in the low epics)
  • Party member C: another cleric (capable of 9th circle casting, but not into epics yet)
  • Party member D: an epic FS (again, low epics AFAIK)
  • Party Member E: a rangerish / roguish sort

We are up against a problem in the form of a band of hostile NPC Lolthite priests that are going to need significant "softening up" done to them before we can carry out much else, operationally speaking. Considering that simply going in and being stabby isn’t really an option (again, don’t ask me how we know this), what approaches are there to preventing the NPC spellcasters from regaining spells over an extended period of time (a tenday or more in the in-character timeline)?

So far, using Daylight cast repeatedly through Eye of Power and direct castings of Symphonic Nightmare have come up from my research, but I would like to know if there are other options out there that I haven’t seen, especially ones that’d be more optimal (harder for divine casters to enact countermeasures against and / or requiring less invested effort) for long-term targeting of divine casters.

Can you target yourself with touch spells

I have been asked by one of my players “can I touch myself with a spell the has a range of touch?” Most touch spell say “you touch a willing creature of your choice,” or something along those lines. And my judgement is that you’re willing if you want to impose the effects on yourself. So I say, a touch spell is a spell that is kind of like a self that you can also use on other creatures or characters. Please correct me if I’m wrong and tell if I’m right.

Can a wizard prepare new spells while blinded?

For a wizard, preparing new spells at the end of a long rest seems to require studying their spellbook (emphasis added):

You can change your list of prepared spells when you finish a long rest. Preparing a new list of wizard spells requires time spent studying your spellbook and memorizing the incantations and gestures you must make to cast the spell: at least 1 minute per spell level for each spell on your list.

Assuming a wizard’s spellbook is a mundane book or other written medium, does this mean that they cannot prepare new spells if they are blinded at the end of a long rest? What if their spellbook is something more exotic, such as a spellshard?