How do the Warding Bond and Sanctuary spells interact?

So I (war cleric) and my friend (paladin) want to use warding bond. It says:

[…] While the target is within 60 feet of you, it gains a +1 bonus to AC and saving throws, and it has resistance to all damage. Also, each time it takes damage, you take the same amount of damage. […]

So the questions are:

  1. If I cast sanctuary on myself, does the enemy who attack my friend have to roll a saving throw first before it hits me because of warding bond? Or does warding bond nullify the sanctuary effect on me?
  2. Is it okay to cast healing spells inside the sanctuary?
  3. If I have the defensive duelist feat, can I use my reaction to nullify the attack I got from warding bond?

Who can create copies of spells that can subsequently be copied into spellbooks, etc?

Character A finds a spell written on a wall and copies it. He takes the copy to character B who copies it into her spellbook or Book of Shadows for her future use. Assume the spell is one B can prepare and use. Character B is a wizard, a tome warlock, or has the ritual caster feat.

What must be true about A for this to be possible?

The best answer will cite sources and cover multiple cases with a simple TL;DR.

How does the dispel check work for single-target spells becoming multi-target using higher levels? [duplicate]

The 2nd level spell Hold Person can affect multiple targets when upcast with a higher level slot.

Suppose a wizard uses a 6th level slot and successfully holds 5 humanoid king’s guards with the spell.

The Dispel Magic spell simply works automatically if it targets any spell 3rd level and below. The caster needs to make an ability check to ends spells of a higher level with a DC of 10+spell level.

If the king’s adviser wished to dispel the spell on one of the guards, would a check be unnecessary because he is attempting to end a 2nd level spell that affects multiple targets or does he need to attempt a DC16 ability check?

Does a golem’s magic immunity bypass its opponent’s defensive spells?

What happens if, for instance, a Golem tries to grapple a foe that had freedom of movement cast on it?

Immunity to Magic (Ex) Golems have immunity to most magical and supernatural effects, except when otherwise noted.

An iron golem is immune to any spell or spell-like ability that allows spell resistance.

Freedom of movement allows spell resistance, therefore the Golem is immune to it. However, the spell isn’t on the golem, even though it is affecting the Golem. Is there a clear rule/precedent for which way this would go?

My gut instinct is to say "yes, the Golem ignores your defensive spells". They may not be being cast on the Golem, but they are still "magical effects", and thus covered by the blanket statement at the start of the Golems entry. Also, I dislike that freedom of movement completely shuts down grappling as a viable strategy for both PCs and enemies at higher levels; SR and magic immunity bypassing it seems like an elegant solution.

Can a spontaneous caster use higher level slots to cast non-heightened lower level spells?

I’m an Oracle. I’ve picked up Divine Access (Ragathiel) which adds True Strike to my spell list. I’ve also added it to my spell repertoire as a 1-st level spell.

Since it is not one of my signature spells I can’t heighten it (not that it can be heightened to begin with).

I’m out of 1-st level spell slots. Can I use a 2-nd level spell slot to cast True Strike?

If a fighter multiclasses into sorcerer, when they cast spells do they also replace material components with somatic?

From the Sorcerer class page,

Because you’re a sorcerer, you can usually replace material components with somatic components, so you don’t need to use a material component pouch.

I interpret this to mean that whenever a sorcerer casts a spell that requires a material component (without a cost), then they can choose to replace that component with a somatic one. From the listing on spell components, this means that the spell would keep the manipulate trait, but one important thing would change: the spell no longer requires you to have a hand free to retrieve and manipulate the material component.

Now, if a fighter takes the sorcerer dedication, then from the dedication page,

You cast spells like a sorcerer.

I interpet this to mean that the fighter also gains the ability to replace any material component with a somatic component, and that as a consequence the fighter can cast sorcerer spells without needing a hand free.

Is my interpretation correct?

How does Wish work with spells that interact with material components?

How does wish work with spells that interact with material components?

For example, how does wish work with a spell like leomund’s secret chest? Do an exquisite chest and small chest just appear with the wish? Or do you need them?

Wish says it doesn’t need any expensive components to cast, but things are a bit unclear here.

What’s the cheapest way for an Eldritch Knight to be able to wield two weapons while still being able to cast spells with somatic/material components?

For the purpose of this question, assume "two weapons" to include "a one-handed weapon and a shield".

Compared to other spellcasters, Eldritch Knights are sort of at a disadvantage when it comes to achieving dual-wielding and the like, as they generally cannot use spellcasting foci (except when using magic items such as a Ruby of the War Mage). Thus, they normally seem to require a free hand for casting spells with components other than verbal ones. For comparison, a wizard could wield a Staff of Power, which – due to being a staff – counts as an arcane focus and thus solves the issue of noncostly material components, but it can also be used as a +2 quarterstaff.

For an EK trying to trivialize somatic components, Warcaster is the obvious choice (no difference to other spellcasters in this regard), and the requirement of a free hand for material components (without a GP cost) can be avoided with a Ruby of the War Mage. However, the former requires spending a feat (even though Warcaster is a pretty good feat for EKs anyway, especially considering that fighters get more ASIs than the average class), and the latter blocks an attunement slot and doesn’t work for costly material components. Plus, if you happen to die in a battle, your attunements end, even if you get Revivified right away (although that’s probably a very rare or even legendary problem ^^).

Is there a cheaper way to get around the issue? For the purpose of defining "expensive", please consider this order (the higher up on the list, the more expensive):

  1. Multiclassing (and requiring three multiclass levels is obviously worse than requiring one)
  2. Requiring additional actions
  3. Feats
  4. Attunement Slots
  5. Requiring additional bonus actions
  6. Choosing specific (sub-)class options, such as a Fighting Style.
  7. Magic Items without attunement
  8. Ingame time (e.g. downtime training)
  9. Requiring your object interaction
  10. Money

I’m aware of other questions on almost the same topic, namely this one (warlock-focused or at best generic), this one (technically answers the issue, but some GMs might consider dropping and picking your weapon up cheesy, plus there are downsides and it only works with Sage Advice rulings), as well as this one (answers claim it’s not an issue, which is not true IMHO – for example, Booming Blade or Green Flame Blade, both great melee cantrips for an EK, have material components).

With Blind Fighting style from Tasha’s Cauldron Of Everything, can you cast spells that require a target you can see?

Blind Fighting, as phrased in Tasha’s Cauldron Of Everything, contains additional wording beyond the description of mere Blindsight. The entry for Blind Fighting reads:

You have blindsight with a range of 10 feet. Within that range, you can effectively see anything that isn’t behind total cover, even if you’re blinded or in darkness. Moreover, you can see an invisible creature within that range, unless the creature successfully hides from you.

Using the optional Class Features for the Fighter class which are presented in TCoE, this Blind Fighting fighting style offers not only 10ft of Blindsight, but the wording above, which by my reading at least heavily implies that you should be able to cast spells which target a space, object, or creature "you can see", within the 10ft range of this ability.

You can explicitly "see an invisible creature", but does "you can effectively see anything that isn’t behind total cover" mean that you can cast sighted spells on targets within that 10ft range?