Arcane Disciple when some spells are already on spell list

Was just looking for a bit of insight into the Arcane Disciple feat. A quick quote on what that does:

Add the chosen domain’s spells to your class list of arcane spells. If you have arcane spellcasting ability from more than one class, you must pick which arcane spellcasting ability this feat applies to. Once chosen, this decision cannot be changed for that feat. You may learn these spells as normal for your class; however, you use Wisdom (rather than the normal ability for your spellcasting) when determining the save DC for the spell. In addition, you must have a Wisdom score equal to 10 + the spell’s level in order to prepare or cast a spell gained from this feat. Each day, you may prepare (or cast, if you cast spells without preparation) a maximum of one of these domains spells of each level.

I’m looking into a summoner build, and want to get into Thaumaturgist as a sorcerer. I figured I’d take Arcane Disciple and pick the summoning domain for Lesser Planar Ally. As a sorcerer though, all the Summon Monster spells and Gate are already Sor/Wiz spells. Does this mean I now need 19 WIS to cast Gate and the appropriate WIS for Summon Monster 1/2/3/5/7? Or can I still use these spells as a sorcerer and just rely on CHA for the main stat?

For further context, Vow of Poverty is part of the character build for a bit of game-balancing flavour. Just wondering if I need to allocate one of my 4 stat increases to WIS. Otherwise I’d rather put my points into just about anything else. Has anyone seen any rules regarding this? Or is it just a straight "the spells in this domain list now rely on WIS", regardless of whether or not they were already on your class list?

Thanks,

Erik

Does Improved Abjuration affects spells that only offer an option of having an ability check?

Consider the Abjuration Wizard’s 10th level feature:

Improved Abjuration

Beginning at 10th level, when you cast an abjuration spell that requires you to make an ability check as a part of casting that spell (as in Counterspell and Dispel Magic), you add your proficiency bonus to that ability check.

Some spells, such as Telekinesis, include cases where an ability check is required, either as soon as the spell is casted, or later one.

If the object is worn or carried by a creature, you must make an ability check with your spellcasting ability contested by that creature’s Strength check.

  1. Does an Abjuration Wizard ever adds his proficiency bonus when casting Telekinesis?
  2. If so, does that only apply to the case where a check is made on the same turn as the casting?

Is it possible for a player to gain the innate ability to regenerate body parts without spells?

Using the DMG’s Injuries variant rule (or just having a character who for whatever reason is missing a body part), a character can lose an arm, leg, or eye, and the regenerate spell is the normal way to get it back. But if you don’t have a party member that can cast that, finding someone who can could be quite a hassle. Hence, the question in the title.

Ioun stones are obvious targets for enemies, and a dragon could eat the arm carrying your ring of regeneration. Undying Warlocks get close with their 14th-level feature, but that only lets them reattach body parts, so if their arm does get eaten off, then they’re stuck, too. The UA Armorer subclass for Artificers doesn’t regrow limbs, but it basically gives you an always-on prosthetic limb for any arm or leg that you lose. Eyes (or any other scars or internal injuries), however, aren’t "limbs". I can’t find any other feature (and don’t know of any race) that gets closer to the goal of regeneration without needing to rely on spells or magic items, other than just playing a monster campaign as a troll (AKA not something a "PC" is generally able to do)

Can a Kenku use verbal spells?

A Kenku can only speak by mimicry, so can a Kenku fulfill the verbal portion of spells of his class? I would assume that he could only cast a verbal spell if he has heard the spell be cast by another caster of his same class. Also, the other caster would have to have cast the spell in a way that the Kenku knew what was spoken and why.

Do any published adventures contain spells a wizard can copy that aren’t written in a spellbook?

A wizard can copy a spell they find into their spellbook. This is described in the "Your Spellbook" section of the Wizard’s class features:

When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a spell level you can prepare and if you can spare the time to decipher and copy it.

Notably, it does not say "when you find a wizard spell in a spellbook". Are there any instances in published adventures where a wizard can copy a spell from something other than a spellbook?

I’m obviously not concerned about spell scrolls here. I’m looking for something like a spell written on a wall or stone tablet, or other surface that does not require a check like a spell scroll does.

This Q&A firmly establishes that the wizard can copy their spells from any written source, but I am not aware of any published examples of this outside of found spellbooks.

Does the Witch Bolt spell end if you use a bonus action, reaction, or movement (remaining within the spell’s range)?

The obvious things are:

  • ending it voluntarily
  • losing concentration
  • breaking the tether with range or cover
  • using a normal action on your turn for something other than witch bolt

What isn’t specified is whether or not the spell ends when you use a bonus action, movement or reaction. I would assume that reactions would be fine because they are quick spells and not on your turn. Movement is generally not considered an action in 5e afaik, so it seems fine too. The description is less clear about bonus actions however, because they occur on your turn and witch bolt states

On a hit, the target takes 1d12 lightning damage, and on each of your turns for the duration, you can use your action to deal 1d12 lightning damage to the target automatically. The spell ends if you use your action to do anything else. The spell also ends if the target is ever outside the spell’s range or if it has total cover from you.

BUT Bonus actions are fast and often without a somatic/verbal component, and most cases in the PHB refer to the normal action as "your action". Also, the action required for witch bolt is NOT casting a spell and so the "bonus spell + cantrip" rule is not applicable here. Witch bolt is presumably taking a mental effort to maintain, such that I wouldn’t be able to cast another normal action spell without losing focus on the beam, but for something like misty step, with only a verbal component and taking minimal effort (especially if it’s a wizard spell-mastery spell), it seems to me like it would be possible.

Anyone know if there’s an official ruling for this, or is it entirely up to the DM? If I were a DM I’d rule that it’s allowed, since it requires giving up your standard action, and you’re still limited to the 30ft tether AND line of sight, AND concentration, AND spell slots if you’re not a lvl 18 wizard. Compared to a high level blastlock hitting for 4d10+20+knockback with eblast each turn, with a cantrip that would allow a bonus spell on your turn and a reaction spell on someone else’s turn, witch bolt with bonus action and reaction (now that I think about the math) still seems underpowered at high levels. (especially now that I realize that subsequent turns don’t add the extra damage from a higher lvl spell slot. A lot of text for something not terrible useful. Still curious though.

TL:DR Can I maintain witch bolt on a target and move normally and use my bonus action to teleport around with misty step (provided I maintain line of sight and tether range), while using my reactions on enemy creature’s turns for counterspell or shield?

From what items can a wizard learn his spells?

I’m now wondering after googling for a while, what are the different sources a Wizard can learn his spells from? Is it only limited to scrolls and tomes, or can a Wizard learn spells from other magic items?

The following quotes are from the PHB, page 114 Your spellbook

You might find other spells during your adventures. You could discover a spell recorded on a scroll in an evil wizard’s chest, for example, or in a dusty tome in an ancient library.

Copying a Spell into the Book When you find a wizard spell of 1st level or higher, you can add it to your spellbook if it is of a level for which you have spell slots and if you can spare the time to decipher and copy it.

For each level of the spell, the process takes 2 hours and costs 50gp. The costs represents material components you expend as you experiment with the spell to master it, as well as the fine inks you need to record it. Once you have spent this time and money, you can prepare the spell just like your other spells.

The way this is worded and considering the few examples we’re given, shouldn’t it be possible to learn a spell from more than just written sources?

An example would be Wand of Magic Missile: would it be possible for a Wizard to learn the spell Magic Missile by studying the spell when used by the item and write down his research and thus learning how to use the spell on his own and eventually master it?

How exactly do cylinder spells and effects “ignore obstructions” in their areas? Or what kinds of obstructions they can realistically ignore?

So, Spell descriptions on Area entry says:

When casting a cylinder-shaped spell, you select the spell’s point of origin. This point is the center of a horizontal circle, and the spell shoots down from the circle, filling a cylinder. A cylinder-shaped spell ignores any obstructions within its area.

I feel like "any" is a bit to strong claim for how it does actually work.

Could someone elaborate step-by-step, how do you actually target such a spell when there are:

  • a low wall in a spell’s area;
  • a wall, higher than the height of cylinder’s point of origin, selected by a caster;
  • ceiling above one of desireable "targets", but lower then a mentioned point of origin?

Should all of them really be ignored?

What were the names of the colored bolt spells of old D&D?

I remember hearing from people who played old D&D about a group of spells that were effective at destroying whatever they were aimed at. I think they were called something like black bolt, green bolt, and blue bolt, and they were pretty much the DMs tool for scaring the players… Or the epic players’ tool for scaring the GM. Does anyone know what I’m taking about?

Can a multiclass divine soul sorcerer / wizard add cleric spells to the spellbook?

I am in a campaign where I am a level 2 sorcerer and level 1 wizard and I have a paladin, a cleric, and a druid in my party. I was wondering if I am a divine sorcerer and have access to the cleric spell list, can the cleric or the paladin write cleric spells in my spellbook?
Or if I find or buy cleric spell scrolls can I add them to my spellbook?

Why? or Why not?