Is this 9th-level spell Find Greatest Steed balanced with respect to other 9th-level spells?

Since the paladin gets the spells find steed and find greater steed, it only seemed natural to take this theme to its logical end: find greatest steed:

FIND GREATEST STEED
9th-level conjuration

Casting Time: 10 minutes
Range: 30 feet
Components: V, S
Duration: Instantaneous

You summon a spirit that assumes the form of the loyalest, majestic-est mount. Appearing in an unoccupied space within range, the spirit takes on a form you choose: a unicorn, a bulette, a felidar, or a nightmare. The creature has the statistics provided in the appropriate statblock for the chosen form, though it is a celestial, a fey, or a fiend (your choice) instead of its normal creature type. Additionally, if it has an Intelligence score of 7 or lower, its Intelligence becomes 8, and it gains the ability to understand one language of your choice that you speak.

You control the mount in combat. While the mount is within 1 mile of you, you can communicate with it telepathically. While mounted on it, you can make any spell you cast that targets only you also target the mount.

The mount disappears temporarily when it drops to 0 hit points or when you dismiss it as an action. Casting this spell again re-summons the bonded mount, with all its hit points restored and any conditions removed.

You can’t have more than one mount bonded by this spell or find steed at the same time. As an action, you can release a mount from its bond, causing it to disappear permanently.

Whenever the mount disappears, it leaves behind any objects it was wearing or carrying.

A mount summoned with this spell cannot take legendary actions. If it normally would have legendary actions, on its turn, it can use its action to take one of its legendary actions.

A paladin can cast this spell consuming two 5th-level spell slots, instead of one 9th-level spell slot.

This spell would appear only on the Paladin spell list, and could be prepared and cast by a paladin once the paladin was 19th-level. Additionally, this spell would be available to an 18th level Bard via magical secrets. I think this spell only being available to 18th level and higher characters is going to be enough to balance it. Compared to true polymorph, the effects here actually seem pretty modest for a 9th level spell; and for the paladin, casting is always going to be limited to once per long rest, as it uses up all of their highest level spell slots.

The mounts I have chosen range from CR 3 to CR 5. The original 2nd-level spell find steed mounts range from CR 1/8 to CR 1/2, and the now penultimate 4th-level spell find greater steed provides mounts ranging from CR 1 to CR 2. These two spells are given a comparative analysis in this answer. This CR 3-5 range seems like an appropriate increase in power, but as with both its predecessors, some of these greatest steeds will be less greatest than others. I’ve carefully chosen four creatures for this spell, I feel that each brings something unique to the table, even though one of them seems to be a head above the rest. Speaking of which…

The Unicorn (CR 5)

If I’m being totally honest, this spell could have been called find unicorniest steed. The unicorn is easily the best mount on the list. It is not the best damage dealer, not even close, but the utility and support the unicorn provides is unparalleled by other creatures on this list. It can cast pass without trace at will, and its ability healing touch is equivalent to a 2nd-level cure wounds twice a day.

The unicorn is the only creature on the list with legendary actions. I felt that giving the unicorn unbridled access to its legendary actions was too much. Additionally, its just easier to keep track of things when I’m not keeping up with my own turn, my mount’s turn, and legendary actions for my mount on other turns. Instead, the unicorn can opt to use one of its legendary actions on its turn. In particular the unicorn’s shimmering shield ability is quite good, and allows the unicorn to excel in its support role.

The Bulette (CR 5)

This guy is the bruiser of the group. At +7 to hit for 4d12+4 damage, the bulette’s bite attack hits like a truck, and AC 17 averaging 93 hp gives him respectable staying power. The bulette really gets interesting with his movement: burrow 40 ft. If you’re nostalgic about catching your first diglet in a cave outside of Vermilion City, the bulette is for you.

The Felidar (CR 5)

The felidar packs a similar punch to the bulette with identical AC and hitpoints, but the felidar is for the more psychically minded adventurer. The felidar has the ability to form a special bond with another creature, granting these benefits:

  • The felidar can sense the direction and distance to the bonded creature if they’re on the same plane of existence.

  • As an action, the felidar or the bonded creature can sense what the other sees and hears, during which time it loses its own sight and hearing. This effect lasts until the start of its next turn.

Similar combat prowess as the bulette, but has some interesting abilities that make the felidar an excellent scout and great insurance policy if his owner gets kidnapped.

The Nightmare (CR 3)

This goth version of the pegasus features an ability that makes it better than his winged celestial brother, earning him a spot on this list. For the most part, the nightmare is identical to the pegasus, which makes him probably the weakest choice on this list. But the nightmare has one ability the earns him his place here:

Ethereal Stride. The nightmare and up to three willing creatures within 5 feet of it magically enter the Ethereal Plane from the Material Plane, or vice versa.

This guy can disappear to the ethereal plane at will. And he can bring his three closest friends. The utility of this ability is limited only by your imagination and how annoyed your DM is that your flaming horse can walk through walls.

Is there a class ability, spell or other, that lets you share spells with your familiar?

Scenario:

I have a Wizard/Warlock with pact of the chain feature, who I have themed off He-Man. I love the idea of using Tenser’s Transformation to buff both he and his familiar up for combat. However, it has a range of self, which seems to really limit my options.

Anyone have a work around? I am willing to change my class or multi class as needed. (We stick to using the hardcover books, and not UA or 3rd party stuff)

Does a Wizard copying a spell count as one of their two new spells for a level?

In D&D 5E Wizards get an additional two spells per level to add to their spellbook:

Each time you gain a wizard level, you can add two wizard spells of your choice to your spellbook.

If a Wizard has a handful of Scrolls and another Wizard’s spellbook they have found while adventuring, can they attempt to scribe them all (assuming they are of the necessary spell level and have the time and money to do so), or are they limited to 2 new spells per level?

Should magic items which allow to cast spells be considered as material components? [duplicate]

For using Counterspell, a spell needs to contain some kind of component, otherwise it cant be countered.

When casting spells from magical items the spell is cast at the lowest possible spell level, doesn’t expend any of the user’s spell slots, and requires no components, unless the item’s description says otherwise. DMG p141.

spells you cast from items can be countered

https://www.sageadvice.eu/2016/12/21/does-the-counterspell-work-against-wands/ https://www.sageadvice.eu/2016/08/21/is-it-possible-to-counterspell-a-magic-item/

So, does it mean that the magic items are considered as the material components of the spell?

Can spells with different types of components be cast in the same action?

Would someone who is casting something with a Somatic and Material component, say Minor Illusion, also be able to cast something with only a Verbal component, say Thaumaturgy, in the same action? I’m making a character who will be casting these cantrips on a regular basis for cosmetic changes, and want to know if there is an official ruling on this.

Is there a way (other than using a wish spell) for a Wizard to cast Ranger spells?

Using a wish spell you can duplicate any other spell of 8th level or lower.

However..

That’s a pretty high lv spell for gaining the use of a 1-5 level Ranger spell. I couldn’t find a version of limited wish. And the feat Magic Initiate doesn’t seem to apply to Ranger’s spells.

Is there another way to cast 1 or 2 Ranger spells without dipping into the Ranger class? Specifically I am looking at Conjure Barrage and Swift Quiver. Mostly because I think it would be cool to launch a ton of darts like a Naruto style Ninja…and it would be unexpected from my wizard.

Worth noting we only use the hardcover books. No UA or 3rd party stuff please.

How does Mythic Haste interact with 1 round spells?

Mythic Haste states:

Affected creatures gain an additional move action each round.

The rules for casting spells state:

A spell that takes 1 round to cast is a full-round action. It comes into effect just before the beginning of your turn in the round after you began casting the spell. You then act normally after the spell is completed.

If I cast a 1 round spell before using my move action, does the spell finish early?

Can a Transmutation Wizard cast ritual transmutation spells to change the active effect of their Stone?

The text for a School of Transmutation wizard’s transmuter’s stone is as follows (PHB p.119):

Each time you cast a transmutation spell of 1st level or higher, you can change the effect of your stone if the stone is on your person.

Does this mean that if a ritual spell such as skywrite (XGE p.165) was cast, the wizard would be able to change what effect their Stone has active?

Is DR/magic weak to all spells, or does it resist spells that cause physical damage?

Ok, so one of the characters in our game is getting DR and is arguing that any damage caused by any spell bypasses the DR.

A creature with this special quality ignores damage from most weapons and natural attacks. Wounds heal immediately, or the weapon bounces off harmlessly (in either case, the opponent knows the attack was ineffective). The creature takes normal damage from energy attacks (even nonmagical ones), spells, spell-like abilities, and supernatural abilities.

The rest of the group is in agreement though that if a spell causes physical damage as opposed to energy or straight magic (like magic missile), then DR should apply. He gave the example of bombardment, saying that because the rocks are created by magic that it counts as a magical damage. The spell doesn’t specifically say a damage type, but obviously the damage is caused by the rocks falling, and not any sort of magic (since it references a non-magical avalanche in the spell). But if you conjure a non-magical animal, that animal’s attacks don’t automatically become magical because it was summoned magically. So, should DR reduce the physical types of damage from spells, or would throwing a rock with a spell count as magic damage as well? *note, the DM already ruled in favor of DR reducing bludgeoning, slashing, etc from spells, so it doesn’t actually effect the rest of us and if he gets his own character killed then so be it. I would actually just like clarification on it because I can’t find anything about it.