How does a low Strength stat translate into the narrative?

I’m having trouble with something. In a ADnD 2e campaign how should a low Strength translate into the narrative/roleplay of the campaign? It’s easy to figure out how high Strength would work when narrating or roleplaying, but I can’t quite figure out low Strength scores. I like to narrate what’s happening like a story with as much detail as I can to really paint a picture for the players. This is throwing a wrench into that.

For example, characters can end up with an effective Strength of 5 if they get hit by a ray of enfeeblement spell. Though the spell says what this means for game mechanics it states "Your DM will determine any other effects appropriate to the affected creature." and I’ve got no idea what sort of effects it may have. I know, according to the Player’s Handbook, that a Strength of 5 offers only a ten pound weight allowance with a twenty-five pounds Maximum Press so a fighter would likely end up dropping their weapon and shield but what about the armour they’re wearing or the other stuff they may be carrying? They can’t just drop that stuff so, what, can they just not move or something? What would a character with a Strength of 5 be capable of? How should a DM or Player portray such a character?

What would a character with a Strength of 1 be capable of? From a narrative stand-point, not just a mechanical one.

How might one permanently change the key ability for a specific skill from a mental to physical stat?

How might one permanently change the key ability for a specific skill from a mental to a physical stat?

Specifically the Craft skill, and from INT to DEX, relating to a character that can carve whatever they see but doesn’t use intellect to do so as they are something of the classic Savant type which does not interface with the world through intellectual logic or thinking patterns.

I am ideally looking for a rule or mechanic that supports the concept, rather than just home-brewing something, if possible. If such a rule or mechanic doesn’t exist, then knowing that is helpful too. And something that can be taken at as low a level as possible, be it feat, trait, feature, item, or power.

I am aware of the Void Disciple ability of Void Release which swaps primary stats for all purposes temporarily, however, taking 10 levels of a prestige class for a 3/d ability is very suboptimal, and does not meet my requirements. The Variant rule for alternate ability skill checks is DM dependent, therefore it may not work when moving the character between different groups and thus is likewise not what I’m looking for.

WotC officially approved materials only please; such as Dungeon, Dragon, Rokugan, Dragonlance, Kingdoms of Kalamar, official co-owned sites, etc..

What does “+6 to hit, Hit: 13 (2d8 + 4)” mean in a creature’s stat block?

My friends and I are very new to D&D, played like 3 times. In a monster’s stats next to weapon damage it says stuff like “+11 to hit” and “Hit: 5 (1d8+1)”. For the premade characters it just says things like “+4, 2d6 + 2 slashing”, though. Why are there two “hit” numbers for monsters? Which do I use for the d20 roll to hit against a target’s AC?

I mean for example like in the Ogre entry in the “Starter Set: Excerpt 7” article on monsters.

How should I stat very powerful artifacts that the party acquires too early?

A few weeks ago I started DMing a campaign that involves five divine artifacts that all of the gods’ powers are filtered through. I planned on the paragon level quest being collecting these in order to either destroy or protect them. Unfortunately, one of my players rolled a natural 20 on Thievery to steal the chestplate artifact at Level 2 (next encounter will level them up). How should I handle the stats on this item?

Opening a skill with B1 stat as root

Suppose a character has perception B1 (maybe they are a young troll or something). If they open their observation skill, either in character burning or through play (testing, practice, instruction). Are all of the following consequences true, or have I misunderstood something? The points are in no way specific to perception and observation; those are just examples.

  1. The new skill opens at B0.

  2. The new skill can not be rolled, even with artha. That is, it is no longer possible for the character to even try rolls they could try before opening the skill, even under neutral or favourable conditions.

  3. The only way to reacquire the ability to make observation tests is to get practice or instruction to increase the skill to B1. (In character burning, one might have extra skill points to increase the skill beyond just opening, but let us ignore this for now).

The consequence number two seems quite unintuitive, which is why I am asking.

is a bigger creature with similar str stat automaticaly stronger?

I had a discussion with my dm about how to handle str stat on a creature of large size. Lets say i have an orc with str 20 and something big like a basilisk or something, and i try to beat it in some str check or “contest” the dm states something like ” You cant tell me that an orc is stronger than a much larger basilisk!”. Even though it doesnt make much sense wouldnt i be still stronger because my str stat simply is higher?