Can a Kensei monk spend a bonus action to use the Kensei’s Shot feature after they make an attack roll, and still do the extra damage on that attack?

The Way of the Kensei monk’s Path of the Kensei feature grants several benefits, including Kensei’s Shot. The wording of Kensei’s Shot is as follows (Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, p. 34):

You can use a bonus action on your turn to make your ranged attacks with a kensei weapon more deadly. When you do so, any target you hit with a ranged attack using a kensei weapon takes an extra 1d4 damage of the weapon’s type. You retain this benefit until the end of the current turn.

Can you choose to spend the bonus action to use Kensei’s Shot after rolling to hit, and still gain the extra damage on the attack you just made? Or do you have to declare that you’re using Kensei’s Shot before you make the attack roll?

Does making a melee weapon attack with Shillelagh still counts as a Strength-based attack?

Playing a melee Circle of Spores Druid and wanting to use that 1d6 extra damage I’d get if I cast Guardian of Nature and take the Primal Beast form. Here are the relevant texts from each spells:

Shillelagh
"…For the duration, you can use your spellcasting ability instead of Strength for the attack and damage rolls of melee attacks using that weapon…"

Guardian of Nature
"Primal Beast. Bestial fur covers your body, your facial features become feral, and you gain the following benefits:

  • Your walking speed increases by 10 feet.
  • You gain darkvision with a range of 120 feet.
  • You make Strength-based attack rolls with advantage.
  • Your melee weapon attacks deal an extra 1d6 force damage on a hit."

I know the Great Tree form specified Wisdom-based attack rolls, but would it be out of the question if the benefits from the Primal Beast form would apply to melee weapon attacks despite under the effect of Shillelagh?

if booming blade or green flame blade are counter-spelled, does the attack still go through?

Booming blade says:

As part of the action used to cast this spell, you must make a melee attack with a weapon against one creature within the spell’s range.

Counterspell reads

You attempt to interrupt a creature in the process of casting a spell. If the creature is casting a spell of 3rd level or lower, its spell fails and has no effect.

Does counterspell interrupt the attack made in conjunction with casting booming blade?

Considering “PointSize[0]” and even $[-1]$ in NumberLinePlot, why those circles still exist?

In this code, I put "PointSize[0]" (or [-1])

NumberLinePlot[{Sin[x] < 0, Sin[x] >= 0}, {x, 0, 13},   PlotStyle -> {Directive[Thickness[0.001], Red, CapForm["Butt"],      PointSize[0]],     Directive[Thickness[0.001], CapForm["Butt"], Black, Opacity[100],      PointSize[0]]}]  

but I get this plot

enter image description here

As can be seen, those circles still exist (cf. magnified part). How can I get rid of these circles and have only line segments?

If a player casts Hunter’s Mark and the target dies and combat ends, is the spell still functioning for a later combat? [duplicate]

I’m a new DM and new to this forum!

I’m running a game and one of my players is playing a ranger, we’re all still pretty new to the game and ran into a question about how one of her spells, Hunter’s Mark works.

Here’s what happened. We had a short combat in which the player cast Hunter’s Mark on one of the guards. He and the other guards were all eventually killed and combat ended. The players then proceeded to finish sneaking into the house they were trying to break into. A few minutes later, the group ran into another set of guards. So here’s where my question comes into play. Is her former Hunter’s Mark still active?

I thought no, since she did not mark a new Hunter’s Mark target "on a subsequent turn of yours," since the original combat had ended and we had therefore left turns. She thought it was still working, since the duration of the spell is one hour, and that hadn’t passed yet.

Thanks for your insight!

Does an unconscious creature still use its dexterity to avoid attacks?

Related – How does one dispatch a helpless opponent?

Here’s the unconscious condition description:

Unconscious

An unconscious creature is Incapacitated, can’t move or speak, and is unaware of its surroundings The creature drops whatever it’s holding and falls Prone. The creature automatically fails Strength and Dexterity saving throws. Attack rolls against the creature have advantage. Any attack that hits the creature is a critical hit if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature.

So attacks against the creature have advantage, and any attack that hits is a critical – but you still can miss because of the creature’s AC. Armor Class includes dexterity bonus. The description doesn’t say the creature’s AC changes somehow.

Does it mean the creature still benefits from its dexterity, both in terms of mechanics and in-game world?

An example situation

A low-level party of Barbarian and Bard fights a sneaky thief, who has AC of 15 due to his +4 dexterity bonus. The Barbarian attacks, so does the Bard, but their results are 12 and 13. DM described that the thief was twisty enough to dodge both attacks.

Next round, the Bard puts the thief to sleep (hence, unconscious) with the Sleep spell. The barbarian makes a melee attack with advantage, but his best result is 14. It is still a miss, isn’t it? As a DM, how can I plausibly describe such an outcome?

Can a character inlay a +1 wand into a weapon and still gain its casting benefit?

I’ve been playing 5e for about a year now and recently started my own campaign DMing for a group of people that have never played before. They took to it immediately! Things have been going pretty well so far and we’ve been having a great time.

Our group’s warlock recently found a Wand of the War Mage +1. He’d like to find a high level wizard who can help him inlay it into a dagger (or, for those more flavour text oriented, a black kris blade). The goal being to then have a functioning dagger that gives a +1 to spell attack rolls. It would still be primarily a spellcasting focus, but would additionally give him a little bit of melee should he be caught in close range and not able to escape (he is a pure caster and not a bladelock so will be doing his best to avoid direct combat most of the time).

I asked my former DM (a very much RAW kind of guy) and he said NO. He didn’t really have a good explanation as to why though. I am, however, leaning in the opposite direction, If he’s willing to part with his gold I see no reason not to let this happen. Still, is there support for or against this decision?

I don’t yet have all the materials myself and was wondering if there is anything outright stated about this type of crafting (inlaying) in RAW. That being said, I would love to hear more opinions, either for or against, from some more experienced DMs.

Are you still two-weapon fighting if you’ve thrown one of your two weapons and are no longer holding it?

In this question we see that two-weapon fighting with darts is not possible because they are not melee weapons. Let’s replace the darts in that scenario with daggers, which are valid light melee weapons for two-weapon fighting, and also have the thrown property.

Two-weapon fighting says:

Two-Weapon Fighting.

When you take the Attack action and attack with a light melee weapon that you’re holding in one hand, you can use a bonus action to attack with a different light melee weapon that you’re holding in the other hand. You don’t add your ability modifier to the damage of the bonus attack, unless that modifier is negative.

If either weapon has the thrown property, you can throw the weapon, instead of making a melee attack with it.

Consider this scenario:

Bob the rogue has two daggers drawn and ready to go. He throws his first dagger as his attack action, satisfying the condition of "when you take the Attack action and attack with a light melee weapon that you’re holding in one hand."

At this point, he is no longer holding this weapon in hand because he has thrown it. He is now holding only one dagger, in his other hand. In this case, the condition above has been met, but does he get to use the bonus action to attack with a "different light melee weapon [held in his] other hand" even though he is now wielding only a single weapon?

In other words, is the bonus attack granted at the moment the first attack made, as long as you meet that first condition of "attack[ing] with a light melee weapon that you’re holding in one hand," regardless of how many weapons you end up holding after the first attack?