User Profile synchronization connection has been deleted but still user profiles show up in SharePoint

We have SharePoint 2013 environment and we have 2 AD connections (ie. 2 different domains) in User Profile Service Application. All the users from DomainA have been moved to DomainB and AD team have created new user accounts for these users. Now I want to delete the old user accounts of DomainA. So , I went ahead and deleted the DomainA connection and ran a full synchronization and this did not resolve my issue. As domainA users still show up in SharePoint.

AD Import is the synchronization method we are using to import users from AD.

Appreciate any help 🙂

Sharepoint site still down even after restore the content databse to new web app

We’ve a major issue in our main intranet portal. It’s down with a lot of errors that were not fixed by investigating on event viewer and ULS logs.

However, I’ve restored the content database to a date before the incident, but still the same issue was happening. So I created a new web app in the same farm and attached the main content database to it, but still I’m getting some errors as shown below:

Notes:

  • The central admin is working fine, but the web app is down, and they are on the same server.

  • The original web app name (which is down) is: http://sp-l1

  • The new web app that I created and attached the db to it is: http://sp-l1:8080

Here is the error I’m getting when open the site:

Sorry, something went wrong

Unknown server tag ‘dev:datetimelabel’.

Correlation ID: cef1ea9e-da03-0010-814b-70100b22910d

When I search for the ID in the ULS logs, I get the below:

https://pastebin.com/raw/UZYW5wGf

How do you export still images from an MPEG?

I have Mac Mojave with the regular version of Quicktime (not Pro). How do I export my short MPEG to a series of frames/images where I can grab and keep one of the images?

Note, I am looking for a way to grab a frame without playing the video, pausing it, and then taking a screen capture. Also I would prefer not to pay for software to help me to do this.

Still not understanding why the Knapsack Problem does NOT have a polynomial-time solution

All the explanations for why the $ O(nW)$ DP algorithm that solves the Knapsack Problem is NOT polynomial repeat the same thing: it is the length (in bits) of the input that matters, not its value/magnitude. The solution has the following structure:

# some preprocessing for i in range(n):     for w in range(W):         # compute stuff 

They repeat the same example: $ W=10_2=2$ , but $ W=100_2=4$ , i.e. every extra bit doubles the length of $ W$ . Here’s my confusion

  • Why can’t I apply the same logic for $ n$ ?

Disabling Gatekeeper is unfruitful : still get the prevention

I found out googling around that while the option to manually allow apps from anywhere to be opened directly was removed : https://www.techjunkie.com/gatekeeper-macos-sierra/

you could still use a terminal command to make the same thing happen :

sudo spctl --master-disable 

yet I ran it, then rebooted and tried running the app again, and I still got the same message preventing me from opening the app and forcing me to open it from the “Security&Privacy” menu in settings.

In a context of multiple back to back tests of my app on a fresh reinstall of mac & also new accounts, I cannot put up with it anymore I’d like to be able to do something to the mac when I use one of it’s accounts for the first time (or better yet something GLOBAL that applies to ALL accounts) and not have to think about it anymore.

At this point, placebo buttons are still helpful for users in web design?

I had this question related to the redirect buttons. Some apps or websites need time to save data before making a redirect or load some content. Usually, an action from the user can’t help. In these actions, a loader or a progress bar help the user see the progress. I was wondering if a “redirect” or a “refresh” button really has benefits.

I did some research and I read this article, “Idiot Buttons: The Placebo in UX Design” and this question from 6 years ago, “Examples of placebos in UI design?”.

I realized it is the same case for the “save” buttons because most apps auto-saves everything and I read this interesting answer for the question “Why don’t we auto-save for users instead of having them save manually?”:

In Marketo, the app auto-saves everything. We have very few “Save” actions.

However, interesting side-effect. In the email editor, some users were so panicked that there was no “Save and close” button, that we added one.

All these articles and question have some good arguments to use placebo buttons, but all the studies I found are from 2-6 years ago. In the last years, people use a lot of apps with autosave or other automate actions.

A placebo button is one more element on the screen and can be replaced with a “info” message, but this will be enough? What do you think?

What are the best practices, in this case, to keep the UI familiar and give to the user the illusion of control or to keep it simple?

At this point, placebo buttons are still helpful for users in web design?

I had this question related to the redirect buttons. Some apps or websites need time to save data before making a redirect or load some content. Usually, an action from the user can’t help. In these actions, a loader or a progress bar help the user see the progress. I was wondering if a “redirect” or a “refresh” button really has benefits.

I did some research and I read this article, “Idiot Buttons: The Placebo in UX Design” and this question from 6 years ago, “Examples of placebos in UI design?”.

I realized it is the same case for the “save” buttons because most apps auto-saves everything and I read this interesting answer for the question “Why don’t we auto-save for users instead of having them save manually?”:

In Marketo, the app auto-saves everything. We have very few “Save” actions.

However, interesting side-effect. In the email editor, some users were so panicked that there was no “Save and close” button, that we added one.

All these articles and question have some good arguments to use placebo buttons, but all the studies I found are from 2-6 years ago. In the last years, people use a lot of apps with autosave or other automate actions.

A placebo button is one more element on the screen and can be replaced with a “info” message, but this will be enough? What do you think?

What are the best practices, in this case, to keep the UI familiar and give to the user the illusion of control or to keep it simple?

I can’t find my .nomedia folder or the folder it is in anymore, but the files still seem to be there

So i recently followed the advice posted here: How do I keep audiobook separate from Google Music? by @Tzunki in order to keep my audiobooks out of Google Play Music. I made a .Audiobooks folder and put them all in there and then added a .nomedia folder for good measure. It worked great, but now I’m trying to delete out an old audiobook and add a new one, and i can’t find the folder or any of the audiobooks.
I’ve tried searching for the files and the folder names, etc, but it looks like they are all hidden somehow and i can’t find any of them in order to edit them. I went back to my audiobook player to make sure they are still there and played them and they play. I checked the rood folder for the files in my audiobook player and it shows /storage/emulated/0/.audiobooks (which is not where i told it to look when i created the .Audiobooks folder) but i looked there and there is some data file instead of the audiobooks, so i’m thinking it is just like a bookmark so it knows where in the audiobook i left off?
anyways, any help you can offer would be great, thanks.

*edit with a little more info: I’ve tried to just type in Computer\Galaxy S6\Phone.Audiobooks, but it says Windows cant find it. Also, i thought i might try to re-create it, and see if it repopulated with my files but when I try to change the name of my New Folder to .Audiobooks it won’t change. Just reverts back to New Folder.