If I twinned spell cast Glyph of Warding as a spell glyph, can I store two different spells, or does it need to be the same one?

I have a sorcerer wizard. He wants to use twinned spell metamagic to cast glyph of warding as a spell glygh, twice on two different surfaces.

Spell Glyph. You can store a prepared spell of 3rd level or lower in the glyph by casting it as part of creating the glyph.

Can he cast two different spells to be stored in the spell glyph, or would it be the same spell twice?

Digital Products Web Store

Why are you selling this site?
As a webdeveloper i setup and develop custom sites, i set this up for interested clients who would like to use it to build their own online store

How is it monetized?
Via selling products on the websites the ones of your choice

Does this site come with any social media accounts?
Not currently, but i can setup the required accounts for you

How much time does this site take to run?
It should be as much as you want, from 30 minutes…

Digital Products Web Store

online store advice

Hi folks, I hope things are well.

I am creating a new online store. I don't have a website yet. I don't need my own domain at first. I am located in Canada and would like to sell to Canada OR to (Canada and the US). I will be selling hockey / baseball cards etc. Some but not all items will have images. I need to be able to bulk uploads / updates of items (from csv, excel etc) and have them automatically go into specified categories (tens of thousands of items eventually). Would be…

online store advice

Cowrie (Honeypot) to not store passwords for certain username entries [closed]

I have a honeypot setup on port 22 (using "cowrie"). I need certain usernames to be logged without passwords. So if someone logs in with the username "jack" and the password "passw0rd", it will only not log the password while if someone were to login with "harvey" and the password "password" it will log the harvey’s username and password.

Server (please complete the following information):  OS: NAME="CentOS Linux" VERSION="7 (Core)" ID="centos" ID_LIKE="rhel fedora" VERSION_ID="7" PRETTY_NAME="CentOS Linux 7 (Core)"  Python: Python 2.7.5 

Is there a way to store an arbitrarily big BigInt in a bit sequence, only later to convert it into a standard BigInt structure?

I am trying to imagine a way of encoding a BigInt into a bit stream, so that it is literally just a sequence of bits. Then upon decoding this bit stream, you would generate the standard BigInt sort of data structure (array of small integers with a sign). How could you encode the BigInt as a sequence of bits, and how would you decode it? I don’t see how to properly perform the bitwise manipulations or how to encode an arbitrary number in bits larger than 32 or 64. If a language is required then I would be doing this in JavaScript.

For instance, this takes bytes and converts it into a single bit stream:

function arrayOfBytesTo32Int(map) {   return map[0] << 24     | map[1] << 16     | map[2] << 8     | map[3] } 

How would you do that same sort of thing for arbitrarily long bit sequences?

Does PGP passphrase necessary if I store private key and passphrase in the same place?

I’m building a system that generates PGP key and store private key in secret vault. One thing I’m not fully understanding is the need for passphrase.

I can generate a random passphrase during the key generation and then store it in the secret vault along side with the private key, but I’m wondering if it has any benefit. If I store both passphrase and private key in the same place and that place can be considered secure, is there any additional benefit of using the passphrase? Or just storing the private key securely is enough?

What’s the best way to encrypt and store text in a MongoDB database?

I have a "cloud service", which consists of 2 parts:

  • Web application, written in Next.js;
  • MongoDB database (uses MongoDB Atlas).

I allow users to sign in with GitHub and handle authentication using JWT. User can create & delete text files, which are saved in the database as so:

{     "name": string,     "content": string,     "owner": number    <-- User ID } 

I would like to encrypt the content so that I can’t see it in the database. I was thinking about using the Web Crypto API, but I’m not sure how I’m going to store the encryptions/decryption key securely.

What’s the best way to handle this case and which encryption algorithm should I use?

Are web worker / service worker secure environments to store a password, credit card information, access tokens?

If there is a case where I wish to store sensitive data like a password, credit card information, or access tokens:

Are web workers / service workers a secure environment, where such data can not be compromised? If so, what to do to really secure it? If not so, why not exactly?

Can one trust OS and apps from Onyx: app store, modified Android, Onyx Cloud

Onyx Boox is a brand of e-book reader produced by Onyx International Inc, based in China. They have e-book readers based on Android OS. They have features that can violate user privacy or other accounts security:

  1. App store with optimized for e-book apps from other App stores: kindle, office, evernote and etc
  2. Account manager: Dropbox, Evernote and etc
  3. Option to enable Google play and other Google services (like Calendar)
  4. Onyx Cloud (sync personal notes and etc)

So the question is: are there any sings of backdoors or vulnerabilities known about their modified apps or OS itself or other stuff that can lead to user data leaks (like privacy leaks or leaks of sensitive information: like passwords or other data)?