Is my adaptation of the Battle Master as a Wizard subclass balanced relative to other Wizard subclasses and to the original Battle Master?


Background Motivation

I wanted to create a subclass for Wizard that uses an expendable die resource to augment its magic and benefit its allies, similar to how the Battle Master Fighter expends superiority dice to fuel maneuvers which augments its attacks and benefit its allies.

Design Process

The following were some significant steps and motivations in my design process.

  • I called the subclass the School of Pedagogy because, thematically, a Wizard of this subclass is an academic who studies magic at a theoretical level. I called the equivalent of Battle Master maneuvers “theorems” for the Pedagogy Wizard and the equivalent of superiority dice “savant dice.”
  • I evolved the Pedagogy concept from the Unearthed Arcana Lore Master and School of Invention, but almost nothing from those inspirations remains.
  • I ported the Battle Master subclass features (at 3rd, 7th, 10th, 15th, and 18th Fighter levels) into the chassis of the Wizard (at 2nd, 6th, 10th, and 14th Wizard levels), trying to keep a similar pacing of improvements.
  • I reduced the die size progression and the utility/skill features for the Pedagogy Wizard to include only d8 and d10 savant dice to account for Wizards generally being more powerful than Fighters at higher levels and for Wizards generally having more skills.
  • I ported many of the Battle Master maneuvers directly into theorems with minimal changes to apply the benefits to spells and magical effects. However, not every maneuver was sensible to port, so I excluded some. Then I created original theorems to fill unique magical needs that exist for a Wizard but not for a Fighter.
  • I compared the resulting theorems to all subclass features of other Wizard subclasses to avoid stepping on their toes. Some features and theorems are inspired by class/subclass features from other classes, in which case I tried to avoid impeding on those as well. I specifically avoided duplicating any Sorcerer Metamagic features.
  • For wording all theorems that add or subtract a die on an attack, check, or save, I tried to use wording identical to that used in Battle Master maneuvers, Bardic Inspiration, and the bless and bane spells: if the intent is that you can add/subtract before or after the roll is resolved, it’s explicitly stated; otherwise, you add it when you make the roll.
  • I iterated the subclass many times using feedback from several other DM’s. We will be playtesting the subclass for two Wizard characters in two campaigns (one where I am the DM and one where I play the Wizard), but it hasn’t made it to the table as of this posting.

Text of the Subclass (version 1.0)

The following is the result of my design effort.

Arcane Expertise

At 2nd level, you gain proficiency in the Arcana skill if you aren’t already proficient in it, and your proficiency bonus is doubled for any ability check you make that uses Arcana.

Magical Savant

When you choose this school at 2nd level, you learn magical theorems that are fueled by special dice called savant dice.

Theorems. You learn three theorems of your choice, which are detailed under “Theorems” below. Many theorems enhance a spell or other magical effect in some way. You can use only one theorem per effect.

You learn two additional theorems of your choice at 6th, 10th, and 14th level. Each time you learn new theorems, you can also replace one theorem you know with a different one.

Savant Dice. You have four savant dice, which are d8s. A savant die is expended when you use it. You regain all of your expended savant dice when you finish a short or long rest.

You gain another savant die at 6th level and one more at 14th level.

Theorems

The theorems are presented in alphabetical order.

Applied Studies

When you make an Intelligence (Arcana, History, Nature, or Religion) check, you can expend one savant die to add it to the check. Alternatively, when you or a friendly creature who can see or hear you makes an Intelligence (Investigation) check, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to add it to the check before or after making the check, but before any effects of the check are applied.

Beguiling Spell

When you cast a spell that forces a creature to make a Wisdom saving throw against being charmed or frightened, you can expend one savant die to make the spell especially beguiling and hard to ignore. Subtract the savant die from that creature’s first saving throw against the condition.

Damping Defense

When a creature damages you with a weapon attack, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to reduce the damage by the number you roll on your savant die + your Constitution modifier.

Distracting Spell

When you hit a creature with a spell attack, you can expend one savant die to distract that creature, giving your allies an opening. You add the savant die to the attack’s damage roll. The next attack roll against the target by an attacker other than you has advantage if the attack is made before the start of your next turn.

Dual Strike

When you cast a spell with a duration of Instantaneous and it deals damage to a creature on your turn, you can use a bonus action to direct one of your companions to strike in tandem. When you do so, choose a friendly creature who can see or hear you and expend one savant die. That creature can immediately use its reaction to make one weapon attack against the same target, adding the savant die to its attack roll.

Elemental Flux

When you cast a spell that deals acid, cold, fire, lightning, or thunder damage, you can expend one savant die and choose one of the spell’s damage types from that list to substitute for another type from that list for the spell’s duration. The first time you roll damage for the spell using the substituted type, add the savant die to the damage roll.

Focusing Oration

When a friendly creature that can see or hear you misses with an attack, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to refocus that creature’s efforts. Add the savant die to the attack roll, possibly changing the outcome.

Galvanizing Oration

When a friendly creature that can see or hear you makes a saving throw to end an ongoing effect on itself or to maintain concentration, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to add it to the saving throw.

Maneuvering Spell

When you cast a spell with an area of effect, you can expend one savant die to direct one of your comrades to exit the area. Choose a friendly creature who can see or hear you in the area. Before the spell takes effect, that creature can use its reaction to move up to its speed, adding the savant die to its AC until it stops moving.

Mental Agility

When you roll initiative at the start of combat, you can expend one savant die to add it to the roll. When you use this theorem and aren’t incapacitated, you can’t be surprised on your first turn in combat.

Merciful Spell

When you reduce a creature to 0 hit points with a spell and the target isn’t killed outright, you can expend one savant die to hold back some of the spell’s energy and merely knock the target out. The target falls unconscious and is stable. You gain temporary hit points equal to the savant die roll + your Wisdom modifier.

Precision Spell

When you make a spell attack against a creature, you can expend one savant die to add it to the attack roll. You can use this theorem before or after making the attack roll, but before any effects of the attack are applied.

Reactive Cantrip

When a creature misses you with a melee attack, you can use your reaction and expend one savant die to cast a damaging cantrip that targets only that creature and has a duration of Instantaneous. Add the savant die to the cantrip’s damage roll.

Stirring Oration

When you cast a spell with verbal components on your turn, you can use a bonus action and expend one savant die to encourage one of your companions with an insightful speech woven into your spellcasting. Choose a friendly creature who can see or hear you. That creature gains temporary hit points equal to the savant die roll + your Charisma modifier.

Swift Spell

When you cast a spell that forces a creature to make a Dexterity saving throw, you can expend one savant die to make the spell especially swift and hard to avoid. Subtract the savant die from that creature’s first saving throw against the spell.

Tough Spell

When you cast a spell that forces a creature to make a Constitution saving throw, you can expend one savant die to make the spell especially tough and hard to withstand. Subtract the savant die from that creature’s first saving throw against the spell. This theorem can’t hinder a Constitution saving throw made to maintain concentration.

Expeditious Research

Starting at 6th level, you can use the Search action as a bonus action.

Improved Magical Savant

At 10th level, your savant dice turn into d10s.

Timely Epiphany

Starting at 14th level, when you roll initiative and have no savant dice remaining, you regain one savant die.

Question

Is this Wizard School of Pedagogy balanced relative to other Wizard subclasses and to the original Fighter Battle Master that inspired it? In other words, can the School of Pedagogy coexist with those other subclasses as a useful, distinct, and coequal option without impinging on their design? Things to watch for…

  • Flawed language with ambiguity or unintended consequences.
  • Features that are not level-comparable with similar features from other classes/subclasses.
  • Features granting benefits that are too powerful relative to existing options.
  • Features that are game-breaking within the game’s existing design.
  • Features that are so niche or unhelpful they would never be chosen or used.

I am not at all concerned with whether the Pedagogy Wizard seems thematically or mechanically similar to the Sorcerer, so any similarity between the concept of theorems and of metamagic isn’t considered to be infringing on the use case of Sorcerers for purposes of my question, unless a theorem directly replicates a particular Sorcerer metamagic option.

(To the best of my ability, I’ve followed the recommendations on Meta for how to present a homebrew balancing question. I’m happy to accommodate actionable suggestions for improvement of the question. However, if I need to iterate the subclass design again after reviewing the answers, that will be done in a separate question. Finally, sorry for the wall of text. I hope it’s easy to follow.)

Is the unofficial Arcane Puppeteer subclass balanced to play with official classes?

One of my players asked me to play this subclass.

It is written there that it has not been playtested, so I am a bit scared to allow him to play that class.
Do you know if it is safe to play? Or more in general, do you have any tip to identify the strength of a class before playing it?

Can a Path of the Totem Warrior barbarian have different totems chosen for each subclass feature at the same time?

I was creating a goliath Path of the Totem Warrior barbarian (PHB, p. 50), and had chosen the Bear totem for his 3rd-level Totem Spirit feature. The 6th-level Aspect of the Beast feature, however, is redundant for a Bear totem/goliath combination, since they both basically double his carrying capacity. I wondered if I could choose a different totem at 6th level.

I did notice the following language for each subsequent totem choice after the first (at levels 6 and 14):

At ___ level, you gain a magical benefit based on the totem animal of your choice. You can choose the same animal you selected at 3rd level or a different one.

My first assumption was that this is like swapping out spells known when you level in some spell casting classes, such as the bard (i.e. if you choose Wolf at 6th level, your abilities switch over to a Wolf Totem barbarian). After all, in online discussions, people often refer to a Bear Totem barbarian, or a Wolf Totem barbarian, but never do I see reference to a multi-totemed Barbarian. However, I wanted the 6th-level Wolf ability, but didn’t want to give up the 3rd level Bear ability.

Can a Path of the Totem Warrior barbarian have multiple totems? That is, can they have different totems chosen for each subclass feature at the same time?

question about the Wildemount Chronugy subclass ability chronal shift

I was playing in a game with friends and I was playing as a level 8 Chronugy wizard, after a creature downed one of us our bard attempted to use id insinuation and it used a legendary resistance. my question was if I had used my chronal shift ability which allows me to force a re roll on a saving throw. my question is can I use my ability to force it to burn a resistance, and alternatively if I use it on a success and it fails can it choose to use a legendary resistance on the re roll.

I personally feel that it is OP if I can force it to burn two resists

but I also feel it is op if it can choose to resist my re roll power as it wastes my ability

I want to know if anyone has a RAW answer and if not, what people think of the problem

Is this revised homebrew Way of the Force monk subclass balanced compared to the official monk subclasses?

This is a monk to emulate be a force user, as from the Star Wars universe.
There is a spoiler from The Last Jedi film. I thought that the ability to telekinetically affect your environment is too cool a concept to be left to a couple of spells, so I wanted to create a martial class that could utilise these concepts.

The homebrew subclass in this question was finally playtested, so I can come back and try and refine it.

However, it was not an extensive playtest, so assessment from the community is appreciated. Prior to playing, I removed the multiple concentration feature of Force Prowess, leaving just the increased cost for more targets component.

The main issues seen were:

  • the contested checks resulted in both more rolling and more swinginess in whether the ability worked
  • using contested checks instead of saves meant that boss targets couldn’t circumvent the abilities
  • the ability to force something prone from range or to restrain something were both very powerful (especially against flying targets)

It was also unsatisfying to attempt to use an effect, just for it to fail, and my limited resource be wasted. As I was playtesting, I also found myself unwilling to use the Greater Telekinesis feature that lets you move creatures as an attack – maybe this was just due to the situations I was in, but it could just be a quirk of the combats I found myself in.

Additionally, I made some changes to Force Choke, but was unable to test it.

The changes I’ve made off the back of the above issues are changing all of the contested checks to Strength saving throws. This simplifies the text, and lets legendary creatures save from the effects, as well as reduce the amount of rolling. I also switched to using the player’s wisdom modifier instead of proficiency modifier for effects that I wanted to have a limited number of targets; I don’t think this should change too much, however.

I am still worried about the balance and feel of this subclass. It still has the issue that, quite often, a turn can be wasted trying to get a target to succumb to a force effect, and you fail consistently, wasting a lot of resources. Other subclasses get features they can use without resources; currently, this subclass only has Life Sense for that. Additionally, the ability to force something prone, or to restrain a target, from range gives a large incentive to just keep trying to get these powerful effects. The use of Strength saving throws instead of Dexterity saving throws is also a tad worrying; I’m not sure how unbalanced that is, though.

How balanced does this subclass seem in relation to officially published monk subclasses? What ways could it be improved to increase player satisfaction, with regards to resource expenditure, that official subclasses take into account?

Way of the Force

Monks that follow the Way of the Force have learnt how to use their ki to manipulate their surroundings with their mind, tapping into the energy that inhabits all things.

Telekinesis

Starting when you choose this tradition at 3rd level, you can use your ki to telekinetically manipulate the world around you. You gain the mage hand cantrip if you don’t already know it, and it is invisible.

Force Radius. A force radius of 30 ft that is centered on you defines where you can use ki specific force features. Your force radius increases to 60′ at level 11, and increases to 120 ft at level 17.

When you take the Attack action on your turn, you can forgo one of your attacks to spend 1 ki point to achieve one of the following effects against a Large or smaller creature, or an object, in your force radius.

  • Force Shove. The target must make a Strength saving throw. If they fail the save, you can do one of the following: knock the target prone, push the target up to half your Force Radius directly away from you, or pull the target up to half your Force Radius directly towards you. Unattended objects automatically fail this contested check, and if an object is held by a creature the creature makes the check.

  • Force Grab. The target must make a Strength saving throw. If the target fails the saving throw, it is grappled for one minute while you concentrate on the effect (as if concentrating on a spell). The target can use an action to try and break the grapple, repeating the saving throw.
    Unattended objects automatically fail this saving throw, and if an object is held by a creature the creature makes the save. An object held in this way can be moved to a location within your force radius up to half your force radius away from its origin point as an object interaction, and stay aloft in the air at the end of the move if you wish.

Greater Force Connection

Mind Powers. At level 6 your connection to the Force grows. You gain the ability to cast Charm Person (1 ki point) and Suggestion (2 ki points) using Wisdom as your spellcasting ability modifier. You can cast Charm Person at higher levels by spending one ki point for every level above first level you wish to cast it at, to a maximum total number of ki points equal to your wisdom modifier.

Life Sense. You can concentrate for a minute and learn the number of creatures within double your force radius, as well as their locations relative to your own. You do not learn any further information about these creatures, such as creature type or identity. You cannot detect either undead creatures or constructs with this feature.

Greater Telekinesis. Your Telekinesis abilities now work on Huge or smaller creatures and objects, and you can move creatures with Force Grab as well as objects. When moved in this way, you must use an attack to force the creature to make a Strength saving throw. If they fail, they are moved to a location of your choice within your force radius, following the same rules as moving objects with Force Grab. If they succeed, they are not moved.

Force Prowess

At 11th level you can apply the effects of Telekinesis to additional creatures and objects beyond the first by spending one ki point for each additional creature, up to a maximum of your wisdom modifier. When moving objects using Telekinesis, you can move any number of held objects using a single object interaction.
Your Telekinesis abilities now work on Gargantuan or smaller creatures and objects.
Finally, when you attempt to Force Grab a creature, you can increase the number of ki points you spend to 3 ki points and try to hold a creature more fully. Instead of being grappled when you succeed on the contested Force Grab check, a target is restrained, and repeats the contested check at the end of each of their turns. When you target additional creatures with this effect you must spend 3 additional ki points for each additional creature.

Force Mastery

At 17th level your mastery over your ki and the ki of others is legendary.

  • The radius of your life sense increases to 1 mile, and you can tell the creature type of each detected creature.
  • Creatures remain unaware of the effect you have had on their mind when you use Greater Force Connection abilities on them.

In addition to the features above, you can choose to gain one of the following features:

  • Force Choke. When a creature is held and restrained by your Force Grab, you can choose to start choking them if they are within half of your force radius. As an action on your turn, you can choose one creature that is under the effects of your Force Grab, and start choking them. They begin choking, and they become paralyzed for a minute. If they take any damage while paralyzed in this way, this effect ends on them. Additionally, you can use an action on following turns to crush the windpipe of any creature that has started choking in this way. They have to make a Constitution saving throw, or be reduced to 0 hit points. Creatures that don’t need to breathe cannot be reduced to 0 hit points in this way, but can still be paralyzed by this feature. If a creature manages to escape your Force Grab, they are no longer under any of the effects from this feature.

  • Force Lightning. As an action on your turn, you can spend 5 ki points to start spewing lightning at your foes, concentrating on this effect for up to one minute. A beam of lightning flashes out from your hand in a 5-foot-wide, 120-foot-long line. Each creature in the line must make a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, a creature takes 10d6 lightning damage. On a successful save, it takes half as much damage. You can create a new line of lightning as your bonus action on any subsequent turn until your concentration ends, without having to spend further ki points. These lines of lightning vanish at the end of your turn.

  • Force Projection. As an action on your turn, you can cast Mislead by spending 5 ki points. Instead of the duplicate appearing where you are, however, you can choose to make the duplicate appear within 30ft of an ally you are aware of on the same plane of existence as yourself.

Is there a Monk or Fighter subclass similar to the Black Butler character?

The Black Butler anime series centers around a bodyguard / butler with, shall we say, a demonic flair. I would love to play a similar class in our upcoming Avernus campaign (say a subclass of fighter or monk, or maybe even a hybrid). I’ve found a couple of homebrew options, such as this Way of the Demon Fist monk subclass.

However, I was wondering if there is a subclass in the official source materials that matches what I’m looking. Homebrew is okay (though not preferred) – so if there are well-used homebrew options that you know of, that would be useful as well.

Relevant abilities:

  • Unarmed strike capabilities (a la monks)
  • Perhaps some sort of eldritch or hellfire-type magic ability

Do class or subclass features that affect spellcasting apply when casting a spell from an Artificer’s Spell Storing Item?

In my recent question about a homebrewed Artificer subclass, I was asked in a comment how one of the abilities that modifies spellcasting would interact with casting spells stored within a my subclass’s variant version of the Spell Storing Item feature that all Artificers get. I’d not considered it before, but I suspect it should work the same as a normal spell cast from a normal Spell Storing Item.

But as it turns out, I’m not actually sure how that works for normal Artificers either. Here’s the relevant rules text for Spell Storing Item (from Eberon: Rising from the Last War, page 58):

While holding the object, a creature can take an action to produce the spell’s effect from it, using your spellcasting ability modifier. If the spell requires concentration, the creature must concentrate.

Notable in that rules text is that it does not say that the creature using the object casts the spell, only that it produces the spell’s effect. This seems relevant because the top voted answers to this previous question seem to mostly attach to the “cast” terminology used by most magical items that grant extra spells.

In combination with the answers to that question, it seems like the different language (not using “cast”) may mean that using a Spell Storing Item isn’t spellcasting, and so no feature that modifies spellcasting will apply. But there’s enough ambiguity that I want to ask about it here. Do an artificer’s spellcasting features apply spells they store in an item? Do spellcasting-related features of the creature using the Spell Storing Item (which may or may not be the Artificer themself) apply?

For a concrete example, if an Artillerist stores Scorching Ray in a wand, staff or rod that they had previously made their Arcane Firearm, would they get an get an extra d8 to add to one of the spell’s damage rolls when they use the stored spell?

How balanced and clear is my Arcane Luthier subclass for the Artificer

I’ve long been disappointed by how brief and largly meaningless D&D 5e’s handling of musical instruments is. Bards can use them as spellcasting focuses, but other than that, there’s not much to them. Hardly anyone has a reason to play a musical instrument for any length of time, nor does it really matter much if you’re any good at it.

To address that, I decided to make my own subclass that focuses on crafting and playing musical instruments. It’s a subclass of the Artificer, using class rules from Eberron: Rising from the Last War (which is not the same as any of the earlier drafts of the Artificer in various Unearthed Arcana documents).

Here’s the subclass, my questions about it are below:

Arcane Luthier

An Arcane Luthier is a master of the magical crafting of musical instruments. While less innately talented than a Bard at musical performance, an Arcane Luthier’s skills at musical composition and the ability to create their own personalized instruments often makes them among the best instrumental performers around. Their abilities to manipulate emotion with music can make them very popular with those who hear them play.

Musical Instrument Proficiency and Crafting

When you adopt this specialization at 3rd level, you gain proficiency in two musical instruments of your choice.

  • If you spend an entire long rest touching a musical instrument you are not proficient with, you can exchange one of your existing musical instrument proficiencies for proficiency with the touched instrument. You are always proficient with musical instruments you have crafted yourself, even if you are not proficient with their instrument type.
  • Musical instruments you are proficient with count as tools for your other Artificer class features (so you may use them as spellcasting focuses, create them with The Right Tool for the Job, and use double your proficiency modifier on ability checks made with them after you gain the Tool Expertise feature at 6th level).
  • If you create a musical instrument with The Right Tool for the Job and keep it with you continuously for one week, you may use appropriate materials worth half the instrument’s normal cost during a long rest to make it permanently become a normal item which will no longer vanish if you use The Right Tool for the Job to create another tool or instrument.

Arcane Luthier spells

After you adopt this specialization at 3rd level, all spells on the Bard spell list count as Artificer spells for you.

  • You must use a musical instrument you are proficient with as a spellcasting focus to cast any spell not normally on the Artificer spell list.
  • At 3rd level, you learn Minor Illusion cantrip. You may not exchange this spell for another cantrip, but it does not count against the number of Artificer cantrips you know.
  • You always have certain spells prepared after you reach particular levels in this class, as shown in the table below. These spells don’t count against the number of artificer spells you prepare.

\begin{array}{c c} \textbf{Artificer Level} & \textbf{Spell} \ \hline 3\text{rd} & \textit{Charm Person, Silent Image} \ 5\text{th} & \textit{Calm Emotions, Enthrall} \ 9\text{th} & \textit{Fear, Hypnotic Pattern} \ 13\text{th} & \textit{Compulsion, Hallucinatory Terrain} \ 17\text{th} & \textit{Dominate Person, Seeming} \ \end{array}

Instrumental Virtuoso

At 3rd level, you know how to blend spellcasting into your instrumental music.

  • While you are playing an instrument you have crafted (either with The Right Tool for the Job or more mundane means), you may change the casting time of an Enchantment or Illusion spell with a casting time of 1 action to instead have a casting time of 1 bonus action. You must follow the normal rules for casting spells with a bonus action (briefly: you may not also cast a leveled spell with your main action, cantrips are OK).
  • When you cast an Enchantment spell in this way, you can prevent one or more affected creatures from knowing they were magically charmed and from becoming hostile when the spell ends. For each creature you wish to do this for, you must spend one action during the spell’s duration performing music they can hear and succeed on a Charisma (musical instrument) check with a DC equal to 10 plus half the creature’s CR or level. The creature will still know their emotions or behavior have been manipulated, but will assume it is just a natural effect of your music, rather than a magical effect.
  • You may play music with an instrument you have crafted in place of the vocal or somatic components of any spell you cast. If a spell has costly material components that you have in your possession, you do not need to use a free hand to manipulate them (though they will still be consumed if the spell says so).

Beguiling Melodies

Starting at 5th level, you can compose musical themes that enhance the abilities of your spellcasting to manipulate the senses and emotions of those who hear you.

  • Whenever a creature makes a saving throw or an investigation check against a spell you cast from the schools of Enchantment or Illusion, it does so with disadvantage if you are playing a musical instrument you are proficient with and the target can hear your music.
  • You are a skilled accompanist, able to compose and play fanfares and harmonies that bring out the best in the performances of others. When you are playing music with an instrument you are proficient with, you may use the Help action targeting any number of creatures of your choice, but only to give the targets advantage on ability checks to perform before an audience who can also hear your music. The performances you accompany do not need to be musical, you can also accompany dramatic or oratorical performances with your music.

Magically Charged Instrument

At 9th level, you can add additional magic to musical instruments you create.

  • This feature works like the Spell Storing Item feature of the core Artificer class, but it may only be used to store a spell from the Bard spell list in a musical instrument that you have crafted. If you store a first or second level spell, it follows the normal rules for Spell Storing Item. You may instead store a 3rd level Bard spell in the instrument, but if you do, the instrument will be destroyed when the spell ends the first time it is used.
  • This feature operates separately from the regular Spell Storing Item feature, so when you have both after 11th level, you may store spells in two different items, one instrument from this feature, and another item (which may also be an instrument, since they can be spell focuses for you) from the normal Spell Storing Item feature. Use the normal Spell Storing Item rules for the second item, even if it is another musical instrument.
  • Starting at 15th level, you may use this feature store a 4th level Bard spell, with the instrument being destroyed after one use. If you store a 3rd level spell, the instrument will only be destroyed after its second use, rather than its first.

Battlefield Instrumentation

At 15th level, your instrumental performances awe your enemies, even in the thick of battle.

  • Creatures that are not immune to being charmed have disadvantage on attack rolls against you if you are playing music with an instrument you have crafted and they can hear your music.
  • While you are playing music with an instrument you have crafted, you may cast the Sanctuary spell on yourself, without needing to have it prepared or using a spell slot. The spell has no effect on creatures that cannot hear your music, and ends immediately if you stop playing. You may cast the spell this way a number of times equal to your Intelligence modifier, and regain all uses after you complete a long rest.
  • While you are playing music with an instrument you have crafted, you may cast Mass Suggestion, without needing to have it prepared or using a spell slot. After you cast it in this way, you may not do so again until you finish a long rest.

I’ve also created a thematically related Infusion, that any Artificer should be able to choose:

Enhanced Instrument

Item: A musical instrument (requires attunement)

While playing this instrument, a creature gains +1 on ability checks related to their performance. Spells cast with this instrument as a spellcasting focus gain +1 to their spell save DC. These bonuses increase to +2 when you reach 10th level in this class.

My questions:

  1. Are there any ambiguities in the rule presentation, or ways I could better or more consistently phrase things? Because some of my previous reviewers were not as much mechanics geeks as I am, I have deliberately included some text restating some existing rules (like how bonus action spellcasting limits your main action, and which Artificer features interact with their tool proficiencies). But other than that, I’d like to be a bit less wordy if I can get away with it without introducing ambiguity.
  2. Is this subclass balanced? I’d appreciate comparisons against other Artificer subclasses, as I’ve only had a tiny amount of experience playing with an Artificer in the same game as me. I’d also like to compare Arcane Luthier Artificers to Bards, since there’s a bit of overlap between them, given that my subclass gets access to the Bard spell list. One of my reviewers was particularly concerned since Artificers can choose to prepare any spell on their spell list, while Bards can only learn a few of their spells, swapping them out only as they level. Is that versatility really problematic, given that an Artificer is a half-caster?
  3. Does the subclass overlap too heavily with the Bard thematically? I’d hope that there would still be a clear distinction between the high-CHA Bard front-man (e.g. Freddy Mercury) versus the high-INT Arcane Luthier guitar virtuoso (e.g. Brian May, with his PhD in Astrophysics). But would it be problematic to have both in the same party?
  4. Does the subclass diverge too far from conventional D&D norms? It’s inspired in part by modern stereotypes about rock musicians, and I’m not sure if there is an equivalent from the middle ages. I suppose that D&D does not always need to adhere too closely to history, but I don’t want to push things too far. And maybe the Artificer is a norm-shifting class already, with a bit of steam-punk theming, and this isn’t any worse.

What class and subclass are the most efficient to rush fights per tier?

Context:

I ask this question because I played a bard from level 1 to 2 almost 3 (4 sessions). It was great except during battle. These battles were not that difficult but were (too) long. We’re kind of a newbie party so players don’t play that fast yet. The point is I wanted to play a character that would deal consistent great amount of damage in order to rush through less entertaining fights.

I switched to a vengeance paladin. I’m a level 3 variant human starting with polearm master, a quarterstaff, dueling fighting style and it does great. The limited divine/searing smite, vow of enmity and hunting mark add a great deal of damage, and if I use them with parsimony, I feel like I can be efficient all the day long in destroying fights we come up with. Without spell slot and with 16 STR I can deal 1d6 + 6 + 1d4 + 6 => 14-22 damage per turn (if i don’t miss) without opportunity attack nor smites.

I feel like the feat is a bit OP in the early levels, but except the level 5 extra attack, I fear that my damage output won’t scale that much and that I will heavily rely on spell slot to keep up.

So, I wondered, if my character happens to die (I don’t plan to beg my DM to reroll every other session), what I should be picking.

Constraint:

Also, no multiclassing.

Recap: Looking for the most op vanilla builds per tier that features high damage, quick fights, usefulness throughout the day.

I don’t want build that are based on: Tanking, CC, debuff (except for dealing higher damage)

Candidates:

I considered eldritch blast Warlock, Champion fighter, Assassin Rogue (looks like it deals lots of damage in the first turn), or wizard (when it has enough spell slot to deal a lot of damages on average if there isn’t too much fights, bonus: possible AoE damages).

If i ask this is because I’m kind of a new player and that i don’t have enough experience to feel the gameplay of every classes just by reading their description (which I did).

I’m open to answers that do not directly answer my questions if you feel that I would benefit from reading it.

EDIT:

Before downvoting, please comment and tell me what did wrong with this post.

Is this “Fortune Domain” Cleric subclass balanced?

This subclass was initially conceived of as a complement to the Order domain. It evolved from being focused around chaos and disorder to emphasizing luck and randomness, instead. The end result is a subclass with several features revolving around advantage and disadvantage, meant to be a reflection of modifying the odds of a particular outcome.

Most of the features were created as modified versions of other cleric domain features. However, I’m not very experienced in creating homebrew content, and would like to know if the overall subclass is balanced.


Fortune Domain

Fortune domain spells

Cleric level     Spells 1                Chaos Bolt, Ray of Sickness 3                Enhance Ability, Mirror Image 5                Bestow Curse, Blink 7                Confusion, Freedom of Movement 9                Contagion, Skill Empowerment 

Most spells were taken for flavor reasons, involving rolling extra dice or improving ability rolls. Ray of Sickness, Bestow Curse, and Contagion were selected as sources of disadvantage, which are important for other class features.

Unfortunate Itch

When you choose this domain at 1st level, you learn the Infestation cantrip. For you, it counts as a cleric cantrip, and doesn’t count against the number of cleric cantrips you know. Also, when you cast Infestation, the movement caused can provoke opportunity attacks.

I added a bonus cantrip in order to match with the Light and Grave domains. Infestation deals less damage than Toll the Dead on average, although on a separate save ability. The ability to trigger opportunity attacks should not happen very often.

Luck In

At 1st level, you gain the ability to bend the odds in a favorable way. You can spend a bonus action to give a creature within 30 feet of you that you can see advantage on their next attack roll before the start of your next turn.

You can use this feature a number of times equal to your Wisdom modifier (minimum of once). You regain all expended uses when you finish a long rest.

This feature was created as a heavily modified version of Warding Flare, from the Light domain. I figured that giving advantage on one attack is slightly better than giving disadvantage on one attack, but the cost being a bonus action instead of an action is slightly higher.

Channel Divinity: Fortune’s Favor

Starting at 2nd level, you can use your Channel Divinity to change ill fortune into good.

When you roll damage for a spell, you can use your Channel Divinity to roll an extra damage die for each damage die that shows a 1 or a 2. For each extra damage die that rolls a 1 or a 2, roll another extra damage die. You can use this ability after the damage is already rolled, but only once per damage roll.

This feature was intended to act similarly to Destructive Wrath, from the Tempest domain. Fortune’s Favor is less situational, applying to any damage roll, but does not increase the damage as much on average. The specification for spell damage is to avoid any strange interactions with Great Weapon Fighting.

Luck Out

Starting at 6th level, you gain the ability protect yourself and others by altering the odds. When a creature within 30 feet of you that you can see has disadvantage on an attack roll, you can spend your reaction to use your Luck In feature and cause that attack to miss.

This is again based off of the Light domain feature of similar level. Luck Out is meant to be a more situational version of Improved Warding Flare that is slightly more powerful.

Potent Spellcasting

Starting at 8th level, you add your Wisdom modifier to the damage you deal with any Cleric cantrip.

All cleric subclasses that I have seen have either potent spellcasting or divine strike as their 8th level feature. As I expect this subclass to rely more upon cantrips than melee, I selected potent spellcasting.

Fortune’s Fury

Starting at 17th level, you can use your action to activate an aura of misfortune that lasts for 1 minute or until you dismiss it using another action. The aura extends 30 feet out from you, and your enemies within this aura have disadvantage on all attack rolls and ability checks.

Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish a long rest.

This is yet again based on the Light domain feature of similar level. The ability is significantly more powerful, but is only usable once per long rest.


There are several features that I am concerned about the balance of in this subclass. Luck Out and Fortune’s Favor trade what I believe are approximately equivalent values between situationality and power, but I am unsure of my evaluation. Luck In and Fortune’s Fury are very different from the original features they were based upon, which makes evaluating them difficult for me. Beyond that, I don’t know how well these features interact with each other, or with other class features.

Is this subclass balanced, compared to other cleric subclasses?