Is a target pushed into a wall by a spell effect subject to collision damage?

Some spells can push the target X feet away (like thunderwave, which pushes 10 feet away on a failed save). I was wondering what happens if the target, while being pushed, encounters a wall or other rigid object. Does it take (bludgeoning) damage? To me it seems logical that it would: it is like falling, sudden force applied to a creature due to encountering resistance from an object.

I couldn’t find any rules about this in the Player’s Handbook nor online.

What do you do when a spell or something says that the target needs to do a saving throw without a number for the throw? [duplicate]

For command, it states, "The target must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw or follow the command on its next turn" without any context to how high the target needs to roll for it to succeed. What does the target need to roll to succeed that saving throw? Is the number specific for command or is it the same for all spells like this? I’d like to get all the info I can for this.

Can a bolt-action hunting rifle (long arm), be fired when target is at arm’s length? [closed]

Yesterday, I was running my homebrew system (D100), with a friend and one of my nephews over Discord. It was a zombie apocalypse theme. The situation occurred, when my friend (carrying a bolt-action hunting rifle), was rushed by an ‘infected’, and it did a ‘claw strike’, and missed. It was my friend’s turn next. He wanted to do a scoped shot with the bolt-action hunting rifle, but I informed him that the infected was at arms length (too close).

He said he still wanted to fire his rifle (which I considered a long arm), but I said the target was too close. I gave him the option of using the rifle stock to make a melee attack, but he still wanted to fire the rifle. The ‘discussion’ went on for some time, with me trying to explain to the 2 of them (a third one soon joined in), all saying that he could fire the rifle, even if the target was at arm’s length (1 to 1.5ft away?) Hunting rifle stats: Most full-size, bolt-action hunting rifles weigh more or less eight pounds, are around 41 to 42 inches long and have 22- to 24-inch barrels. This means that with scope, sling and everything hunt-ready, the typical rifle rig weighs-in at around nine pounds. So from above, the rifle needs 3.5 feet ‘clearance’ to fire.

I was telling my friend that because the target was so close, and the rifle was a ‘long arm’, he didn’t have enough ‘space’ to bring it to bare, and point the barrel end at the target (it was in his face’, almost).

Any advice would be most appreciated concerning this above situation.

Does the light from Branding Smite persist after the target dies? [duplicate]

The players were exploring Castle Ravenloft. A trap separated the human paladin from the rest of the party and placed him in a deep pit with no light source. In looking for a way out, he accidently released and then began to fight a wight. This was initially quite bad as he was attacking with disadvantage, while the wight (with darkvision) was attacking twice with advantage. The paladin remedied this by casting Branding Smite, hitting the wight, and making it glow.

Branding Smite, emphasis mine:

The next time you hit a creature with a weapon attack before this spell ends, the weapon gleams with astral radiance as you strike. The attack deals an extra 2d6 radiant damage to the target, which becomes visible if it is invisible, and the target sheds dim light in a 5-foot radius and can’t become invisible until the spell ends.

After two more hits and some Divine Smite, the wight was dead. The paladin wanted to hack off a piece of the glowing wight corpse and use it as a light source to help him climb out of the pit (spell duration is Concentration – 1 minute, the paladin needed three rounds to climb out of the pit). I hesitated, because when the wight ceased to be undead and became just dead, it was transformed from a creature into an object and was thus no longer a valid target of the spell.

Ultimately I ruled that one thing is a valid target for casting the spell itself, another is the persistent effects of the spell, and that the corpse would go on glowing for the duration. However, I would like to know RAW for this and whether all the effects of the spell would cease when the wight was killed.

Related: Is a target suppressed or removed when the target becomes invalid?. Superficially this might appear like a duplicate of my question. However, the question there is about the dominate person spell when the target is no longer a Humanoid because of polymorph. Obviously dominate person cannot continue to work if the target is no longer a Humanoid to dominate, but a dead wight could still continue to be a source of light. I feel like that question is a different situation than Branding Smite where the 2d6 radiant damage is the spell itself and the light produced is a persistent effect of the spell. Maybe the answer is not different, but I believe the question is different enough that it stands on its own.

Also, although not a reason to say that this is not a duplicate, I am unsatisfied with the accepted answer to that question being based on a Crawford tweet.

Will a target being apatic after broken haste still remain apatic after beeing downed? [closed]

We had a strange situation in a fight,

and I really side with my DM here who denied it, but the question still remains:

  1. a character is hasted
  2. the concentration breaks, character is in an lethargic state
  3. character gets knocked down before his next turn
  4. the target is no longer a willing creature (?), also it’s status alignments should end when knocked unconscious
  5. the character receives healing and gets back up on his feet -> will he still be lethargic?

I should note that we assume a character would not remain unconscious even after beeing healed / stabilized for simplicity reasons. ( I heard some groups play it this way, unsure about the correct rulings here )

Can a readied range attack provoke an attack from the intended target?

Pathfinder 1e rules question…

A and B are medium sized creatures. A is a ranged character, B is a melee character.

Lets say A readies a ranged attack at anyone that comes into visibility. No enemies are visible nor within range at the moment.

Lets say B (an enemy of A) appears to A as part of their move + attack turn. B appears by moving adjacent to A — perhaps because B is in fog/stinking cloud and comes within 5 feet, or perhaps the room is in darkness and A only has a candle illuminating 5 feet.

So A gets to use their readied action — they see B, and they shoot (with appropriate miss chances and such). Does B get an AOO in addition to their planned attack?

I would guess that no, B does not get an AOO, for at least 1 of 2 reasons:

  • B becomes visible to A as B is entering the adjacent square, and thus I believe A’s attack would interrupt B’s movement and B is technically not in melee range when the ranged attack is made.

  • I’m not even sure you can make an attack of opportunity when it is your turn, or, if you can AoO when you are triggering the readied action on your turn. (Can B even take AoOs on their turn in PF1e?)

There is a similar question for 4e supporting my guess, but I’m not familiar with 4e and am unaware of the rules differences. That question is here: If a readied ranged attack action is used against the appearance of a burrowing creature, does the attack provoke an attack of opportunity?

However, I couldn’t find a discussion/ruling for PF1e — either my google skills failed me or it hasn’t been asked.

Can you target yourself with touch spells

I have been asked by one of my players “can I touch myself with a spell the has a range of touch?” Most touch spell say “you touch a willing creature of your choice,” or something along those lines. And my judgement is that you’re willing if you want to impose the effects on yourself. So I say, a touch spell is a spell that is kind of like a self that you can also use on other creatures or characters. Please correct me if I’m wrong and tell if I’m right.

Can a Swashbuckler Rogue use sneak attack on an isolated target at OVER five feet(Ranged)?

There are a few questions SIMILAR to this that I’ve found on the website, but none cover this exact issue.

Can a Swashbuckler Rogue use their Rakish Audacity feature to sneak attack with a ranged weapon? Assuming there are no other enemies around either the Rogue or Target. The wording of the subclass feature implies no, but it’s too confusing to say for sure.

If a spell is twinned, does the caster need to provide costly material components for each target?

The Divine Soul Sorcerer can gain access to the revivify spell pretty easily (along with other costly resurrection spells), which has a costly material component that the spell consumes (300 gp worth of diamonds).

If after a particularly rough battle, can the Sorcerer use revivify on two separate creatures who have died for the cost of just 300 gp worth of diamonds or would it require 600 gp worth?

For the sake of this question, assume that a dead creature is a creature and not an object. If it helps, you could consider the stoneskin spell as well.

Which spells require the caster to see a target creature or unoccupied area?

Some spells like Darkness or Fog Cloud might be used to kneecap spells that have the prerequisite phrase "that you can see" which refers either to a target creature or an unoccupied area where something might be summoned. Other spells will of course get shut down by a Silence spell, making their casting nearly impossible.

What are these spells that might get crippled or shut down completely?