Does the bard’s Jack of All Trades feature make them proficient with thieves’ tools?

PHB describes the Jack of All Trades feature as

you can add half your proficiency bonus, rounded down, to any ability check you make that doesn’t already include your proficiency bonus

It also says that

trying to open a lock requires proficiency with thieves’ tools

Assuming that Jack of All Trades does not give you proficiency in any skill that you are not proficient in, does it mean a bard actually can NOT pick a lock?

How can I have a villain restrain PCs in an “intelligent” way without killing or disabling some or all of them?

The party got captured during a showdown with a major villain at the end of the last session: three of them died and the survivor got trapped while trying to flee the dungeon.

All four of them can cast spells, and the villain saw them doing so during the fight. He also saw that two of them have magical companions (it’s 5e D&D, they are an Imp familiar and a Ranger’s Primal Beast) that they can summon to help. He’s a spellcaster himself, so he’s intelligent and he’ll be aware of the capabilities of an Imp familiar, which is a handy companion to have when you’re planning an escape.

He doesn’t want them dead: he wants to send them as slaves to the even more-major villain that he’s working for.

As a clever person, aware of the escape risk posed by spellcasting characters with magical companions to help, I can’t see any reason why he wouldn’t just kill the two with companions and keep the other two bound and gagged, or even unconscious, until they’re at their destination.

But this is a game, and we’re here to have fun, so I’d prefer that not to happen. I’d prefer they weren’t even gagged so they can, at least, hatch an escape plot. I’d also prefer not to have a deus ex machina solution, such as a rescue party arriving, for the same reason as it robs the PCs of their agency. It’s more fun to come up with a plan yourselves. Ideally, I’d also prefer not to fall back on a tired old trope like "the villain is so arrogant he ignores your magical powers and leaves you unbound".

Are there some good ways I can give the players a fighting chance in this situation without making my villain look like an idiot, or taking away their agency?

Can I use a Ring of Telekinesis to tie someone in ropes and then levitate them?

My character recently obtained a Ring of Telekinesis:

While wearing this ring, you can cast the Telekinesis spell at will, but you can target only Objects that aren’t being worn or carried.

I also happen to have some unbreakable rope. Since the Telekinesis spell allows me to

…exert fine control on Objects with your Telekinetic grip, such as manipulating a simple tool, opening a door or a container, stowing or retrieving an item from an open container, or pouring the contents from a vial

Could I use my action to wrap/tie an opponent in rope, and then move the rope into the air, dragging them along?

How should I prevent a player from instantly recognizing a magical impostor without making them feel cheated?

In the campaign I’m running, I’m looking to introduce an NPC who is secretly an antagonistic oni in disguise. An oni’s shapechange feature, however, is explicitly described as magical, and one of my players is a warlock with the Eldritch Sight invocation. I’m worrying that the warlock might decide to use Eldritch Sight during the first encounter with the oni, before the party should have any reason to suspect them, and expose the NPC as an impostor way before I’d like them to.

However, I don’t like to just decide that the oni is immune to the effects of Detect Magic, or has a magic item that protects their identity, or knows Nystul’s Magic Aura, or anything like that. I feel like that wouldn’t be fair to the warlock’s player; after all, they specifically took the invocation to be able to detect magic at their leisure.

Ideally, I’d like to find a way to hint that the NPC might have some mystery surrounding them if the warlock decides to have ES active, but subtly enough to where the PCs won’t immediately distrust or attack the NPC.

Is it possible to turn a monster into a humanoid without giving them average physical ability scores?

Savage Species lists some rituals through which a creature can–in one example given–transform from an ogre into an elf.

If nothing else, it’s an interesting and evocative idea: a 6th level ogre barbarian who tires of racial prejudices and transforms into an elf. His RHD disappear, and he becomes a 6th-level elf barbarian. His lower effective level means he can no longer travel with ECL ~12 parties, but he decides to do it anyway. Heck, maybe he did it partly because he was tired of that +2 LA that Savage Species likes to pretend isn’t a big deal.

Unfortunately, losing all those hit dice is far from the worst thing that happens to him. Doing any of the book’s major rituals means his physical ability scores become, at best, 11/13/9. Considering his ogre-born mental scores aren’t picking up much slack either, this is pretty much unacceptable for a barbarian in all but either very silly or very gritty games.

Is there any printed way around this, or to compensate for this beyond things like wishing for inherent bonuses and equipping magic items (which any high level barbarian is going to get anyway, so the transformed elf barbarian still finishes with noticeably poor scores)?

How do I introduce my BBEG’s power without my pcs rushing in to fight them?

I made a homebrew creature that’s supposed to be impossible for them to fight at the moment as that creature is the BBEG. I wanted to show the strength gap between the pcs start and how strong they will have gotten at the end, but I doubt that they will back away from fighting the creature.

How do I introduce my BBEG’s power without my pcs rushing in to fight them?

If a creature is dropped on a monster, how much damage does each of them take?

If a character who was under the effect of a growth potion (double their height and eight times their weight) and weighed 2,400 lbs. was able to use Dimension Door to teleport 400 feet or more into the air, directly above a Huge-sized monster, and fell on it, how much damage would the falling creature – and the monster – take?

I would assume both would take the 20d6 max for the falling over 200 feet, but is there a estimation on additional damage for the falling creature’s size?

According to the splat calculator, at 500 feet you’d be falling at 196 km/hr, and it would expend 1.6 million joules of energy, the equivalent of over 3,000 mid-sized cars hitting an object at 60 km/hr.

A 2,400-lb. barbarian falling 500 feet is like dropping a mid-sized Toyota Corolla off a 50 story building onto a monster – it should do some damage.

Problem with displaying CSS Stylesheets – Am I adding them correctly in my wordpress child theme?

Is this a proper way to load CSS files into my WordPress child theme?

add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'my_theme_enqueue_styles' ); add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'case_studies_styles' ); add_action( 'wp_enqueue_scripts', 'about_styles' );  function my_theme_enqueue_styles() {     wp_enqueue_style( 'child-style', get_stylesheet_uri(),         array( 'parenthandle' ),          wp_get_theme()->get('Version') // this only works if you have Version in the style header     ); }  function case_studies_styles() {     wp_enqueue_style( 'child-casestudies', get_stylesheet_directory_uri() . '/casestudies.css', array(), rand()); }  function about_styles() {     wp_enqueue_style( 'child-about', get_stylesheet_directory_uri() . '/about.css', array(), rand()); } 

I’m asking because I’ve asked some people to try to load my site, and some of them don’t get the stylesheets at all and just get the blank HTML code.

Also, in the beginning of all CSS files, I have this beginning. Every CSS file has a different version (1.2,1.1,1.0)

/*  Theme Name:   GeneratePress Child  Theme URI:    https://generatepress.com  Description:  Default GeneratePress child theme  Template:     generatepress  Version:      1.2 */