Would it break things to allow a Barbarian to cast spells in rage?

If I was to make a homebrew barbarian subclass that allows barbarians to cast spells in rage, or allowed a barbarian that multiclassed into a spellcasting class, would it break anything? It doesn’t seem that it would, because the no spells while raging mechanic has always struck me as mainly mechanic, but I could be wrong.

How many things can a person hold and use at one time?

I’m learning to play / DM, and watching various videos on line and experimenting. One scenario came up on which I’d appreciate clarification:

The situation is a human wizard has descended some stairs into a dark room. They have taken a torch from the wall in the room above, and they’re carrying their staff in the other hand. They get down to the lower room, and find a handaxe on the floor. The character says: "I pick up the hand axe". My question is: does that imply that the player is now holding two things in one hand? I can’t imagine somehow stowing the staff in my robe… nor can I hold the torch in my teeth — sure I could probably manage to hold both a torch and an axe, or some other combination of two things at once, but I doubt I’d be very proficient… maybe the character switches the staff to the hand with the torch, and uses their dominant hand to use the axe?

How would you handle this as a DM? Just hand-wave it? Ask where the player is going to put either the torch or the staff? Or call out that they’re carrying the torch and the staff in one hand.. make a dexterity check to see if the torch is dropped? Or am I just over-thinking this?

As the action unfolds, the wizard then casts a spell with a somatic component, despite having three things in two hands… they then throw the axe (now just maybe they have two things in one hand) and cast another spell with a somatic component…

Am I just being pedantic here?

Will reducing the cost of Holy Water or improving its effectiveness break things

My L3 LMoP group are planning on picking up some holy water to help with zombies as they’ve heard to tales of undead (old owl well, and thunder tree), but I think they’re going to be very disappointed to find its 25Gp, but is single use, costs an action, affects a single target, and only does the same damage as a greatsword swing.

Essentially, it seems to be only as good as a single decent fighter attack, but uses an action and costs 25Gp. Given that an average L3 PC might expect to do say ~D6 +3 damage with a typical attack, this means they’re getting about 3 extra damage, once, for 25Gp, which seems absurd. Plus it only works on certain foes.

Am I missing something?!

I’d like to make this work for them, so I’m considering some changes to the rules for Holy Water:

  1. Reduce the cost – maybe as low as 5Gp, given that they have a paladin who is visiting a temple to make his oath (this allows me to keep the price higher on other occasions if they did find a way to abuse it)
  2. Make it more effective – maybe an AoE effect?

Will this break the game, or be something they can heavily abuse later?

How would you create a frustrated Fire Wizard who wants to be a doctor but things tend to explode when he wants to heal them?

I’m considering a new character for a pirates-themed game of Pathfinder 2e. He was born in an island full of inhabitants with inherent healing magical habilities and in which offensive magic is looked down upon. Naturally, that place became famous for its doctors, and prospered.

My character was, however, gifted with fire magic habilities. So gifted, indeed, that he can’t barely cast anything else without his fire powers manifesting. But he desperately wants to become a doctor… which is a problem, because randomly turning patients on fire is not a very desirable trait.

As a teen, he was going for a walk with his brother when he fell, and broke his leg. Overconfident on his habilities, my character tried to heal it, and the leg exploded. He was deemed unworthy and exiled from the island shortly after.

My character despises offensive magic, despite being really good at it. And desperately wants to redeem himself and return to his island in the future.

How would you implement something like that on pathfinder 2e? My GM is open for any suggestion – including new habilities. I was thinking about a healing hability heavily dependant on the dice and maybe also dependant on wisdom or his level, to mimic him slowly mastering it through the game – lowering (but not nullyfing) the chance of a healing disaster as the game progresses. I would also like if it added a comical factor to the game – a sort of "tension" whenever my character tries to heal somebody, which I think could result in some fun situations for everybody. However, im aware that, if not implemented correctly, it could instead be frustrating.

I’m fairly new to roleplaying games and pathfinder 2e particularly, so I don’t think im able to come with a balanced solution for this. Any ideas?

Can an Unseen Servant do things that require ability checks?


Once on each of your turns as a bonus action, you can mentally command the servant to move up to 15 feet and interact with an object. The servant can perform simple tasks that a human servant could do, such as fetching things, cleaning, mending, folding clothes, lighting fires, serving food, and pouring wine. Once you give the command, the servant performs the task to the best of its ability until it completes the task, then waits for your next command.

(PHB p. 284)

What happens if the Unseen Servant e.g. tries to steal gold out of a pocket? Or if he is commanded to pick a lock? I would consider those as “simple tasks that a human servant could do”.

Can an Unseen Servant do actions that require ability checks (apart from attacking, which is explicitely prohibited) and if yes, does the caster add his relevant modifier and proficiency bonus?

Why do game engines define the a certain way to do things and not allow a lot of flexibility?

I understand that game engines have their own level design methods and different implementations of levels but why don’t they allow full control of the level design to the game developer? Without actually stating that, "The game developer should do/ use this to get this." rather than "Use these tools to get this done. Have full control over your product." ideology?

I guess its because not all game developers are interested in dealing with low level aspects of the game development phase but wouldn’t it be more efficient if the user can optimize certain aspects of the game to better suit for their product? For example, a mesh object, resource submissions, or other areas which game engines define a certain method?

What’s the extent of things that a charmed creature would do for you under the effects of the *awakened* spell?

Unlike other charms, with awaken you can literally transform a beast or plant into higher-intelligence form of life. For example, an awakened tree gets to have intelligence like humans, limbs, ways to communicate and so on. It gives them freedom they never had.

Do they see the caster as their creator or something? If the caster asks the awakened tree to help in combat, or fight monsters as an ally, would they do it?

Is it possible to lift things multiple times with different castings of reverse gravity?

My players came up with an interesting idea using reverse gravity recently which at the time I let them do because it made sense and I like to keep things flowing but wondered about the actual mechanics of it.

Reverse Gravity lifts everything centered on a point in a 50ft circle 100ft up. 2 of the players in the party had taken it, in player ones turn he cast it at ground level to lift a group of enemies the full 100 feet, the 2nd player then cast the spell a second time centering at the top of the previous spell and lifting the enemies another 100 feet. In player ones turn he stopped his version of the spell meaning player 2 could then drop them 200 feet. As there was nothing to grab hold of on the second casting there was no saving throw

At the time I was unsure if the initial casting of the spell would lock them in at 100 feet but decided to go with it. My players have also asked me if one of them could cast it repeatedly turn after turn. Effectively cancelling it as they cast it a second time lifting people multiples of 100 feet into the air before then dropping them.

Is this a DM decide situation, which I am fine with, or are there any rules stated anywhere for this situation?

Can the spell immovable object be used to carry very heavy things?

The spell immovable object from Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount (pg. 187) says:

You touch an object that weighs no more than 10 pounds and cause it to become magically fixed in place. You and the creatures you designate when you cast this spell can move the object normally. […]

At Higher Levels. If you cast this spell using a spell slot of 4th or 5th level, the DC to move the object increases by 5, it can carry up to 8,000 pounds of weight, and the duration increases to 24 hours. If you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the DC to move the object increases by 10, it can carry up to 20,000 pounds of weight, and the effect is permanent until dispelled.

The two phrases I am interested in here are:

You … can move the object normally

and,

it can carry up to 20,000 pounds of weight.

Suppose I cast immovable object at 6th level on a thin sheet of plywood. I then proceed to stack 19,999 pounds of gold ingots on top of the sheet of plywood. I then attempt to move the sheet of plywood normally.

Can an object under the effect of a 6th level immovable object spell still be moved normally while it is carrying up to 20,000 pounds?