How can I avoid metagaming when I know things my character doesn’t?

One common problem I run into, as a player, is having to feign not-knowing things my character doesn’t but I do, be it rules about certain creatures (“Hmm that rock golem sure looks weak against […]”), or simply some my character did not witness but I did because other players at the table had their characters there and the GM did not split the group.

For example, it can be hard to act like you don’t know your friends are in trouble in the next building, and not go over there just to have a “random look” and oh surprise find something you, as a player, already knew you’d find. Finding myself in such a situation can be avoided if the GM splits the group of players or uses other information-control tricks, but that’s not always done.

When in such a situation, what are good techniques or things I can do to force myself into an “oblivious” state of mind about those things?

How can I more easily feign ignorance of in-game/in-universe information, and have my character act with more accordance to what he knows and not what I know?

What’s the point of things like intelligence/wisdom scores, when those are the predominantly characteristics of the player?

While I understand the role of things like strength (you can/can’t lift that), dexterity, constitution, etc. as character attributes, I really can’t make sense of intelligence/wisdom scores.

If a player notices that you can go around the monster, or just naturally has good memory, they’re going to do clever and insightful things even if they have INT/WIS of 1.

Can I use the haste action to break free of vines or similar things?

Haste states:

Choose a willing creature that you can see within range. Until the spell ends, […] it gains an additional action on each of its turns. That action can be used only to take the Attack (one weapon attack only), Dash, Disengage, Hide, or Use an Object action.

This obviously does not allow to use any other actions that you can usually use, like casting a spell, as the more specific rule beats the general rule of what actions can be used. But what if some other specific effect grants additional option to use an action for? For example say an Assassin Vine has entangled me, that grants me the additional action option of breaking free from the vines:

A creature restrained by the plants can use its action to make a DC 13 Strength (Athletics) check, freeing itself on a successful check.

Can I use my haste action to try to break free?

As far as I can tell, I have two specific rules contradicting each other. If there is no official ruling on this, does anyone know what be ruled in AL?

As a player, how can I avoid stifling new players but also avoid letting things stall?

I have just started a Cyberpunk campaign. 2 of us are experienced RPG-ers, 1 hasn’t played in about 10 years and the other 2 are complete newbies. The GM is not new to RPGs, but is new to Cyberpunk, and this is his first time as GM.

Both myself and the lapsed player have Cyberpunk experience; everyone else is brand new.

My character is a Solo, the only one in the group. My backstory is that I have no personal memories from beyond 6 months ago, but I do remember a lot of “stuff” (how to shoot and fight, history of the world, some local knowledge etc).

The other experienced player is a Netrunner whose personality is that of a weak, sniveling coward who tries to stay out of the way as much as possible if he isn’t hacking.

We have run 2 sessions, and I am finding that I am naturally leading the group – partly because this first mission came from an NPC fixer to me and the other players happened to be around and also looking for work allowing me to put a crew together. I am trying my hardest not to direct the new players’ characters too much and give them a sense of agency to make there own choices, to the point of telling the crew in-game that I am not a leader – I shoot and I kill – but I have so far found myself being put in a position to lead every scene and conversation by the other players, both in and out of game.

The other experienced role-player is playing his role really well, so he allowing himself to be led, becoming distracted and not coming up with many ideas. The ideas he does come up with, he feeds through me, due to the fact that in-game we have known each other the longest and I have protected him the last 3 months.

The lapsed player is a Nomad, as is one of the first-timers. The other first-timer is a Rocker and, to my mind, has the stats that should be leading most conversations; she just doesn’t know at the moment what to ask or do.

Since I’ve never been in a group with such inexperienced players, what techniques can I use as a player to help the new players get a sense that they can come up with ideas and choices? The last thing I want to be is “that player” who makes all the decisions and chooses the route we take, but at the moment, the players are leaning very much on me.

Should I maybe have a chat with the other experienced player and suggest he change his approach slightly to allow him to take a more direct role in making suggestions, so that at least it isn’t all coming from me?

An added complication is that currently we are having to all play online, so we have the vagaries of webcam chat to deal with, which might be stifling things a little more.

How can I ensure that these new players don’t get bored within a few sessions and feel that all they are doing is making up the numbers for dice-rolling in combat?

Does mentioning Product Identity-protected things in a comparison violate the OGL?

I have a homebrew setting that involves a heavily-modified cosmology. None of my planes are identical to the "standard" planes, and the re-used names are only generic ones with heavily-modified meanings. In fact, the only two with identical names are the Astral Plane and the Abyss.

I would like to publish (on a wiki, and potentially more formally) a concordance of sorts for players more familiar with other cosmologies. Basically, a table mapping my_plane to closest standard_plane(s). This would be both for mechanical purposes (any spell that says it involves the <y> standard plane instead uses the <x> custom plane) and for thematic shorthand (generally, beings who live in the <y> standard plane live in <x> custom plane instead).

Can I, without violating the OGL, actually do this by referencing the actual WotC-published, stock-5e-cosmology plane names? If that’s all I do with those names is mention them (without any of the details)?Or is there another sane, understandable way of accomplishing this same task without risking an OGL violation?

From what I can tell, this would fall under nominative fair use as defined in the link:

Nominative fair use permits use of another’s trademark to refer to the trademark owner’s actual goods and services associated with the mark. Nominative fair use generally is permissible as long as (1) the product or service in question is not readily identifiable without use of the trademark, (2) only so much of the mark as is reasonably necessary to identify the product or service is used and (3) use of the mark does not suggest sponsorship or endorsement by the trademark owner.

[ Politics ] Open Question : Why would anyone vote to give Trump another term when things have gotten so much worse under him already in less than four years?

Just look at the state of the country today: Massive protests in the streets. 40 million+ people out of work. 100,000+ people dead from coronavirus. Racial relations badly strained.

Why does an explorer’s pack come with more things that can fit in it?

The Explorer’s pack comes with a backpack and a bunch of stuff that (I assume) goes inside.

A Backpack can fit 30lbs in it. But the stuff – a bedroll (7), a mess kit (1), a tinderbox (1), 10 torches (10), 10 days of rations (20), and a waterskin (5) – totals 44lbs.

My party holds the weight of stuff a bit loosely, rather than playing RAW. But if you did play RAW, you wouldn’t be able to carry all the stuff you’re given. Why would the game designers do that?

What does the OGL mean for things based on d20 elements, but which aren’t games?

I’ve been thinking lately about how the Overlord novels/manga/anime are so clearly based on 3e/3.5e/d20/whatever, yet were still commercially published–and, as far as I’m aware, suffered no legal action from Wizards of the Coast.

Much of the “mechanics” of the series (at least from what I’ve seen) are entirely possible within the parts of d20 that are covered by OGL.

Just as an example, let’s look at Overlord‘s spell magic arrow, a clear copy of d20’s magic missile. It’s a 1st-tier spell, equivalent to a 1st-level spell, and it launches an unavoidable bolt of non-elemental (equivalent to force damage, or not having an energy type) magic that deals a small amount of damage and cannot be blocked by normal means. The spell can also create multiple bolts if cast at a higher tier/level, just like how magic missile would (depending on what exactly the Overlord wiki means by this, possibly similar to the Spell Points variant rule, also open content)

By my reading of the OGL 1.(e), “Product Identity” (which, as per section 7, must be agreed to not have any of the following done with it, from 1.(f): “Distribute, copy, edit, format, modify, translate and otherwise create Derivative Material of Open Game Content”; 1.(b) defines Derivative Material as “copyrighted material including derivative works and translations (including into other computer languages), potation, modification, correction, addition, extension, upgrade, improvement, compilation, abridgment or other form in which an existing work may be recast, transformed or adapted”) includes both the “spell” magic missile and the “magical…effect” produced by magic missile, as well as any modification or adaption thereof.

The effects of magic arrow are clearly derivative of magic missile. But the specifics, such as dealing 1d4+1 damage (or what 1d4+1 damage even translates to, beyond rarely being enough to kill a target with one shot), or having a range of 100 ft. + 10 ft. per caster level, or any of those details which pertain to actual d20 mechanics, do not seem to be mentioned in Overlord.

So this brings me back to the question, which is more general than just that single spell. How is it that Overlord‘s use of things which seem like they ought to be forbidden due to being considered WotC’s “Product Identity”, is actually okay? Is it because Overlord isn’t a game (in which case, where are exceptions like this stated in the OGL? Does it have to do with the fact that the above details are generalized into a written/drawn form?)? Is it because magic missile isn’t explicitly designated as Product Identity beyond the proper name of itself as a spell (in which case, what about spells like sleep and animate dead, which Overlord keeps the names of, or elements such as “troll” creatures with high strength and what amount to d20’s Scent/Regeneration abilities?)? Or is it something else entirely?

(Sorry if the formatting of some of this question is a mess, I’m not really used to dealing with talking about licenses and don’t know what’s considered conventional)

weird things in traffic with wireshark (mitm ?)

I’m searching a malware in my laptop but I’m not sure if it’s within or outside (I mean on the router). Anyway I started to capture the traffic from my pc with wireshark and I found really a lot of weird packets. They’re colored of black and are:

  • [TCP retrasmission] <— a lot
  • [TCP out-of-order]
  • [TCP Dup ACK]
  • [TCP Spurious Retrasmission]
  • [TCP ACKed unseen segment]

Those errors could be signs of some kind of mitm attack ?