Can an Unseen Servant do things that require ability checks?


Once on each of your turns as a bonus action, you can mentally command the servant to move up to 15 feet and interact with an object. The servant can perform simple tasks that a human servant could do, such as fetching things, cleaning, mending, folding clothes, lighting fires, serving food, and pouring wine. Once you give the command, the servant performs the task to the best of its ability until it completes the task, then waits for your next command.

(PHB p. 284)

What happens if the Unseen Servant e.g. tries to steal gold out of a pocket? Or if he is commanded to pick a lock? I would consider those as “simple tasks that a human servant could do”.

Can an Unseen Servant do actions that require ability checks (apart from attacking, which is explicitely prohibited) and if yes, does the caster add his relevant modifier and proficiency bonus?

Why do game engines define the a certain way to do things and not allow a lot of flexibility?

I understand that game engines have their own level design methods and different implementations of levels but why don’t they allow full control of the level design to the game developer? Without actually stating that, "The game developer should do/ use this to get this." rather than "Use these tools to get this done. Have full control over your product." ideology?

I guess its because not all game developers are interested in dealing with low level aspects of the game development phase but wouldn’t it be more efficient if the user can optimize certain aspects of the game to better suit for their product? For example, a mesh object, resource submissions, or other areas which game engines define a certain method?

What’s the extent of things that a charmed creature would do for you under the effects of the *awakened* spell?

Unlike other charms, with awaken you can literally transform a beast or plant into higher-intelligence form of life. For example, an awakened tree gets to have intelligence like humans, limbs, ways to communicate and so on. It gives them freedom they never had.

Do they see the caster as their creator or something? If the caster asks the awakened tree to help in combat, or fight monsters as an ally, would they do it?

Is it possible to lift things multiple times with different castings of reverse gravity?

My players came up with an interesting idea using reverse gravity recently which at the time I let them do because it made sense and I like to keep things flowing but wondered about the actual mechanics of it.

Reverse Gravity lifts everything centered on a point in a 50ft circle 100ft up. 2 of the players in the party had taken it, in player ones turn he cast it at ground level to lift a group of enemies the full 100 feet, the 2nd player then cast the spell a second time centering at the top of the previous spell and lifting the enemies another 100 feet. In player ones turn he stopped his version of the spell meaning player 2 could then drop them 200 feet. As there was nothing to grab hold of on the second casting there was no saving throw

At the time I was unsure if the initial casting of the spell would lock them in at 100 feet but decided to go with it. My players have also asked me if one of them could cast it repeatedly turn after turn. Effectively cancelling it as they cast it a second time lifting people multiples of 100 feet into the air before then dropping them.

Is this a DM decide situation, which I am fine with, or are there any rules stated anywhere for this situation?

Can the spell immovable object be used to carry very heavy things?

The spell immovable object from Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount (pg. 187) says:

You touch an object that weighs no more than 10 pounds and cause it to become magically fixed in place. You and the creatures you designate when you cast this spell can move the object normally. […]

At Higher Levels. If you cast this spell using a spell slot of 4th or 5th level, the DC to move the object increases by 5, it can carry up to 8,000 pounds of weight, and the duration increases to 24 hours. If you cast this spell using a spell slot of 6th level or higher, the DC to move the object increases by 10, it can carry up to 20,000 pounds of weight, and the effect is permanent until dispelled.

The two phrases I am interested in here are:

You … can move the object normally

and,

it can carry up to 20,000 pounds of weight.

Suppose I cast immovable object at 6th level on a thin sheet of plywood. I then proceed to stack 19,999 pounds of gold ingots on top of the sheet of plywood. I then attempt to move the sheet of plywood normally.

Can an object under the effect of a 6th level immovable object spell still be moved normally while it is carrying up to 20,000 pounds?

Can lists be defined in a special way so that they contain things of different type?

In https://www.seas.harvard.edu/courses/cs152/2019sp/lectures/lec18-monads.pdf it is written that

A type $ \tau$ list is the type of lists with elements of type $ \tau$

Why must a list contain elements of the same type? Why can’t it contain elements of different types?

Is there a way of defining a list polymorphically in the typed lambda calculus, so that it takes elements of any type?

Can we then use the List monad on lists, defined polymorphically?

In Pathfinder 2e, are ability modifier benefits to things like HP and trained skills retroactive?

In Pathfinder 2e, a character’s Constitution bonus affects HP total. A character’s Intelligence bonus grants training in additional skills and languages.

Are these benefits retroactive?

Examples:

  • If a character’s Constitution modifier increases from +2 to +3 as the result of an ability boost, does HP increase by 1 per character level? So a level 5 character going from +2 to +3 Con mod would gain 5 hit points for the ability score increase?
  • If a character’s Intelligence modifier increases from +1 to +2 as the result of an ability boost, does that character gain another trained skill and learned language?

How can I avoid metagaming when I know things my character doesn’t?

One common problem I run into, as a player, is having to feign not-knowing things my character doesn’t but I do, be it rules about certain creatures (“Hmm that rock golem sure looks weak against […]”), or simply some my character did not witness but I did because other players at the table had their characters there and the GM did not split the group.

For example, it can be hard to act like you don’t know your friends are in trouble in the next building, and not go over there just to have a “random look” and oh surprise find something you, as a player, already knew you’d find. Finding myself in such a situation can be avoided if the GM splits the group of players or uses other information-control tricks, but that’s not always done.

When in such a situation, what are good techniques or things I can do to force myself into an “oblivious” state of mind about those things?

How can I more easily feign ignorance of in-game/in-universe information, and have my character act with more accordance to what he knows and not what I know?

What’s the point of things like intelligence/wisdom scores, when those are the predominantly characteristics of the player?

While I understand the role of things like strength (you can/can’t lift that), dexterity, constitution, etc. as character attributes, I really can’t make sense of intelligence/wisdom scores.

If a player notices that you can go around the monster, or just naturally has good memory, they’re going to do clever and insightful things even if they have INT/WIS of 1.