Does Duelist’s Crippling Critical counts for the max number of crit feats used in a turn?

Imagine a character which would become a Duelist 10, focused on doing crits with his weapon. So, he would go all the way until he gets Stunning Critical. The question is:

Could the character accumulate the Stunning Critical feat power with the class ability Crippling Critical or would he need Critical Mastery for doing both? Does the class ability counts as a critical feat for this stacking purpose?

MS SQL running out of Disk Space – can FileGroups be used to free up some space?


Problem

We have a Sql Server 2014 with a 1TB attached disk (on Azure) that’s running out of disk space. We have about 20GB’s left (maybe a few weeks of space). As such, we need to move some data off the CURRENT disk and onto a NEW disk.

Details

Server:

Microsoft SQL Server 2014 - 12.0.2548.0 (X64)      Jun  8 2015 11:08:03      Copyright (c) Microsoft Corporation     Web Edition (64-bit) on Windows NT 6.3 <X64> (Build 9600: ) (Hypervisor) 

MS-SQL 2014 is installed onto a classic Azure VM. This VM is in a classic VNET. The storage DISKS are also classic. As such, we couldn’t just expand the existing disk. MS-Support said that we need to update all of these, if we wish to leverage the modern Azure Storage to allow disk resizing, using the newer SSD disk, etc. TL;DR; we can’t take this offline for hours including all the other subsystems that communicate with the VM via IP address. Now, don’t turn this into a flame-fest .. this is what we’ve been given to work with and will need to fix all of this up later.

So right now, an idea what to try and leverage FILEGROUPS and to move one or more tables into a FILEGROUP and push this FILEGROUP onto another DISK which we have attached.

So the questions here are:

  • Is this a really really crazy and lame idea, first of all?
  • If it’s crap but OK, then will using FILEGROUPS actually move the data from the CURRENT disk onto the NEW disk (which frees up some disk space on the nearly full CURRENT DISK)?
  • If this is still possible, does moving these tables mean the data is locked/unavailable … which means were still back to our initial problem 🙁
  • What about logs? Moving this data means the logs just get a copy of this? (we are doing hourly and weekly backups, I believe).

It’s ok if the data is small, but here’s a quick look at some of our tables…

enter image description here

That first table is massive (with respect to the rest of the data). 750GB ish.

I was thinking of moving maybe the 2nd, 3rd of 4th line, in the result image. Remember how I said the infrastructure is all on OLD classic stuff? This means the HD’s are old and slow so copying data could take some time also.

As an example, I just tried to copy the .mdf‘s (this DB has 1 main mdf and 2 other small ones) from OLD over to NEW disks. that had a quick ETA of 24 hours.

Having the site offline for a few hours is totally acceptable. We can take stuff offline when our customers are asleep. but … 24 hours .. that hurts. The 24 hour idea was a simple test for:

  • Create new 2TB Disk (if possible)
  • turn off sql server.
  • copy mdf + log files to new disk. (24 hours or so)
  • point filegroups from old location to new location
  • start sql server again.

Now, we’re open to ideas and I know that stack exchange is not a site for ‘opinions’ so I’m trying to keep this on target with a suggested answer and to get feedback on it … but we’re open to other solutions to reduce the offline time.

So – can anyone help please?

What determines the ability used for a saving throw?

I’m new to D&D. I was reading about save throws in the Player’s Handbook and saw this:

To make a saving throw, roll a d20 and add the appropriate ability modifier. For example, you use your Dexterity modifier for a Dexterity saving throw.

What determines what type of saving throw it is? The DM? The attack cast on the PC? Or do you add your highest ability modifier to the d20 rolled?

What overpowered combinations would be available if I allow a bonus action to be used in place of a standard action?

It has come up in game a couple of times that a player might want to cast a spell that has a casting time of 1 bonus action using their “main” action (if they have another bonus action they also want to take on that turn, such as giving bardic inspiration, or controlling a Bigby’s hand, etc.)

On the face of it, it seems obvious that something (a bonus action) that is usually much faster than a full action could be done as your full action. Although the question comes up most often with respect to spellcasting, if I house rule this, I would rule that any bonus action can be taken as a regular action instead; however, I would not allow the same type of bonus action to be taken twice (so no giving bardic inspiration to two allies on the same turn, for instance).

Are there any abusive or overpowered combinations I should be wary of if I were to allow a character to take 2 bonus actions instead of one regular action and one bonus action on a turn?

The issue of casting two bonus-action spells would not come up because the rule against casting 2 spells on your turn unless one of them is a cantrip with a casting time of 1 action would still be in effect:

PHB p. 203 (under Bonus Action casting time)

You can’t cast another spell during the same turn, except for a cantrip with a casting time of 1 action.

I know it’s hard to prove/justify a negative answer to a question like this, but I’d be happy to get answers that say you don’t think there would be any issues if you describe how you came to that conclusion.

Can a rogue’s sneak attack feature be used on objects?

The Rogue’s Sneak Attack says

Beginning at 1st level, you know how to strike subtly and exploit a foe’s distraction. Once per turn, you can deal an extra 1d6 damage to one creature you hit with an attack if you have advantage on the attack roll. The attack must use a finesse or a ranged weapon.

You don’t need advantage on the attack roll if another enemy of the target is within 5 feet of it, that enemy isn’t incapacitated, and you don’t have disadvantage on the attack roll.

So my question is can it be used to deal extra damage to objects with normal HP.

Can the spell Arcane Lock be used on objects like books or backpacks?

Having recently had to endure a nosy little halfling, my wizard is considering going ham with Arcane Lock. The spell states that casting it locks

a closed door, window, gate, chest, or other entryway, and it becomes locked for the duration.

Obviously, neither a book nor a backpack are an ‘entryway’. There are plenty of books (many modern day diaries or journals, for example) that come with a locking cover, and it makes sense to me that this spell would affect the lock of such a book. But what about an item without a built-in locking mechanism?

The spell description refers to the target of the spell as an object on several occasions. Since a book is a closeable object, would Arcane Lock work to lock the book shut? How about a belt pouch, or backpack?

Is it possible for a campaign-specific magic item to be used outside of the campaign it is from?

I am currently planning to run a game for my family.

Is it possible for campaign-specific magic items to be used (not just carried) outside of the campaign they are from? For example, could Saint Markovia’s thighbone from Curse of Strahd be used in a Waterdeep adventure?

Is the SDP a=crypto attribute relevant when DTLS-SRTP is used?

The a=crypto attribute in RFC 4568 has a separate section 9.2. for SRTP “Crypto” Attribute Grammar. What it basically includes is a list of attribute values required for encrypting media (crypto suite, method, session params, keys, MKI…).

However, DTLS-SRTP also does the same (RFC 5764 – SRTP Extension for DTLS). So, is it correct to say that where DTLS-SRTP is used, the a=crypto: attribute is not used. For example, does webRTC offer-answer SDP use the “a=crypto:” attribute as DTLS-SRTP is a must for webRTC?

Informational RFC “SDP for webRTC” also does not throw any light on this issue.

Please clarify.

My email address is being used to enroll for online services. Should I be concerned?

Just before Christmas I received the following message in one of my GMail accounts:

Sign-in attempt was blocked
********@gmail.com [redacted by me]

Someone just used your password to try to sign into your account. Google blocked them, but you should check what happened.

I signed into that account and looked at the activity (not by clicking the link in the message, of course) and indeed there was a sign in attempt blocked from the Philippines.

I gather this means that an attacker entered the correct user name and password for my account, but was likely blocked because they couldn’t pass the MFA challenge. Or maybe Google’s fraud detection is actually decent and it knows I’ve never been to the Philippines? Either way, I immediately changed the password and (as far as I know) the attacker didn’t gain control of the account.

However, in the 2 weeks since then, I have received several email verification requests from various online services that I never signed up for — Spotify, OKCupid, a Nissan dealership in Pennsylvania (that one’s interesting), and a few others I’ve never heard of before. Someone out there is actively using my GMail address to enroll for these services.

The account in question is not my main account, and while the password on it was admittedly weak, it was also unique (I never used it on anything else). I changed it to a password that’s much stronger now.

Should I be concerned about this?

Also, if the attacker didn’t gain control of the account, why use it to enroll in all these services?